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Hey yall,
I was just reading how it is a no no to use Starline brass with load data that used Winchester brass. I think 2 grains less is the general rule(?) This is in 45-70. The load data I use used Federal cases. Anyone know how that compares? Should I use the same procedure as if it were Winchester data with Starline cases?
Thanks, John
 

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An accepted practice is to reduce the STARTING load of a published load by 5-8% when changing a component and working up carefully toward the maximum charge watching for signs of excessive pressure or velocity. In the case of Starline brass instead of Winchester, because of the former's reduced case capacity one will reach the published maximum velocity before the maximum charge is reached. For those who have tried that results in about a two grain reduction in the maximum charge. But that shouldn't mean one should just reduce the charge by 2 grains and go. When substituting a component one should always reduce the starting charge and work up carefully.
 

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What Jackfish said, anytime you change any component in a load back off and slowly work back up. This applies to bullets too, even though the weight may be the same different brands can very the pressure.
 

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txpilot said:
Hey yall,
I was just reading how it is a no no to use Starline brass with load data that used Winchester brass. I think 2 grains less is the general rule(?) This is in 45-70. The load data I use used Federal cases. Anyone know how that compares? Should I use the same procedure as if it were Winchester data with Starline cases?
Thanks, John
tx,
Definitely a difference between the two brands. I've clocked the same load, same boolit, same gun, different cases, 100fps difference.
Another surprise for me recently was the difference between new cases and once fired neck sized brass. Increased case capacity with chamber fitting brass means less velocity with the same powder charge. Even with the much smaller 44Mag case this is measurable, and like the 45/70, WW cases ARE different to the heavier, less capacity, Starline brass.
Currently working my way up to 2000#'s of ME in a 1894PG in 44Mag with the new Alliant 410 powder.
Short of pressure testing equipment, I'm finding my most valuable tool is the chronograph coupled with RCBS.Load. Take care!
Cheers,
R*2
 
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