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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After about 15years I've decided to pull my 1895 out to play and build some fresh ammo for it now that I've finished with the 1895 Cowboy. (For now). When I dug out the old stuff from back then I discovered I had a bag of unused brass from back then. Good, I thought, I'd add it to the two boxes of brass that was left over from the Cowboy project.
That's when I discovered something interesting......
The 15yr old brass felt heavier than the newer 1yr old brass. Can't find any difference in the measurements but the old does feel a little stiffer than the new.
Here's the weight...
Old 192.0 gr
New 188.0 gr
All Starline
 

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Same manufacturer old and new?

It's common for cases from different manufacturers to have different weights, and therefore, different case capacity.

Are the cases the same length? Hornady cases loaded for gummy tips are shorter than standard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Same manufacturer old and new?

It's common for cases from different manufacturers to have different weights, and therefore, different case capacity.

Are the cases the same length? Hornady cases loaded for gummy tips are shorter than standard.
Forgot to say, all Starline
 

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Could be the result of one of several explanations.

Change of alloy.
Different forming dies.
Change of manufacturers.
Starline making the cases themselves now.

But, I'm still amazed that you could feel 4 grains difference in your hand...
 

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Chinese brass is lighter 😁😁
 

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Let's say the manufacturer tests the cases before a production run. The Lab finds out that a case 4 grains lighter retains 100% safety factor of the heavier case. After a run of 500,000 cases, almost 300 pounds of brass alloy has been saved.
 

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After about 15years I've decided to pull my 1895 out to play and build some fresh ammo for it now that I've finished with the 1895 Cowboy. (For now). When I dug out the old stuff from back then I discovered I had a bag of unused brass from back then. Good, I thought, I'd add it to the two boxes of brass that was left over from the Cowboy project.
That's when I discovered something interesting......
The 15yr old brass felt heavier than the newer 1yr old brass. Can't find any difference in the measurements but the old does feel a little stiffer than the new.
Here's the weight...
Old 192.0 gr
New 188.0 gr
All Starline

Found the same with Peterson. Old stuff in 6x47 Lapua was 162 gr. New stuff 150 gr. However, the same powder charge in both produce the same result. Along the way they must have found an alloy mix that costs less and does not weigh as much.

When you produce an many units as a brass mfg does, saving a penny every 1,000 is real money!
 

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Well, there are 3 different loading levels for 45-70, so unless you are at the highest level --I wouldn't worry about it. Just for peace of mind I would load 6 of each with same load & bullet and shoot them and see if impact point is different. The 1895 has an OAL limit to feed from mag tube so if there's no length difference you should be good. At the normal pressure levels that 45-70 operates at in a Marlin I would be surprised if there was a difference. However if i am wrong and there is a difference you will want to separate the brass.
 

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After about 15years I've decided to pull my 1895 out to play and build some fresh ammo for it now that I've finished with the 1895 Cowboy. (For now). When I dug out the old stuff from back then I discovered I had a bag of unused brass from back then. Good, I thought, I'd add it to the two boxes of brass that was left over from the Cowboy project.
That's when I discovered something interesting......
The 15yr old brass felt heavier than the newer 1yr old brass. Can't find any difference in the measurements but the old does feel a little stiffer than the new.
Here's the weight...
Old 192.0 gr
New 188.0 gr
All Starline
I can honestly say that brass from yesteryear is better than the junk brass, companies are using today. I have "range", brass that I picked up 30 years ago that reloads better than current production brass. The brass sizes well, bullets seat tight, primer pockets are tight. I have current once fired brass, factory ammo I fired, that the quality just doesn't seem to be there. Some of the current brass primer pockets don't require much force to seat a primer. Brass was just made better back in the day in my opinion. Fortunately for me, I picked a lot of range brass, as I went to the range every week and no one would pick up their brass. I picked up everything, even calibers I didn't even have a gun for. Ammo was cheap and plentiful so I guess that's why everyone just left their brass behind. Which was my gain. Those were the good ole days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Could be the result of one of several explanations.

Change of alloy.
Different forming dies.
Change of manufacturers.
Starline making the cases themselves now.

But, I'm still amazed that you could feel 4 grains difference in your hand...
Just felt different, like it was heavier. I was counting two different opened boxes, then the bag of these old ones. I could feel a difference.
 

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Make the brass a little thinner/cheaper, or put the cost on the consumer... tough choice at times. Starline was always too thick, and still is. Don't get me wrong I love it and use the CRAP out of starline brass, but dang... the brass doesn't have to be as dense as Xiden's skull to work fine and last.
 
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