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I want to work up some reduced loads with the Speer 110 Gr. HPs.

I have heard or read somewhere that the problem with reduced loads is filling the case enough so that the powder is near the primer at ignition (or some such thing).

What would be the best powder for this application?

Also, has anyone used the 110 gr. Remington 30 cal. Carbine bullets in 30-30?

Is there a problem with the nose being too pointed?

Is the .3065 Dia. ok for accuracy?

Thanks all,

Dave
 

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The lightweight pointed bullets have been disappointing to me in .30 cals. Not enough bearing surface is my guess. The Speer plinker does pretty good to 50 yards with its longer sides, but FMJ carbine bullets are not safe in a tube mag. You can load one in the chamber and one in the tube for a two shooter.

Minute of beer can at 50 yards is easy to get. Eight grains of whatever fast pistol powder you have around should so it. Bullseye, Red Dot, AA-2, WW 231, Unique, anything in that range with 100-110 jacketed bullets. Rifle primers do a pretty good job of setting off fast pistol powders in a case as small as the .30-30 so powder positioning is not the concern it might be in a larger case with loftier goals.
 

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Those bullets sound a tad small for good accuracy, I'd look for something closer to .3085 or so, maybe even a good hard-cast bullet. As mentioned, lighting pistol powders in reduced loads is not a problem, but for consistency I usually tilt the rifle up between shots to orient the powder the same way for each shot. I don't know if it helps, but I doubt it hurts. Reduced loads are a lot of fun, especially as a training tool. But evil sort that I am, I am known to slip a full-power load into the mix to keep things interesting. :twisted: My pupils learn quickly to keep their eyes open, and pay attention. Loud surprises are the worst kind! Teehee.

Papajohn
 

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Hello Riflemen-I'm a bit confused on this one. Why is a small reduced load of fast burning powder in a large case not a potential problem? Is this not the exact way that repeatable SEE happen in laboratories? I know this is not a frequent problem but when it happens it is catastrorphic and exceeds any amount of over charge ignition. If I have missed the point here please get me thinking right as this worries me. Life is good, BestLever
 

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BL, it's not so much a REDUCED load as it is a full load with fast powder. That's the difference. I use 9 grains of Unique in the 35 Remmy with pistol bullets, and it's close to a max load with that powder. Where folks tend to get into trouble is with using too little powder in a big case.

Ed Harris had an article out years ago about using what he called, "The Load", I think it was 12 grains of Red Dot, and he used it in dozens of rifle cases from 30-06 on down to 7.62 X 39. As long as the bullets were of ample weight, as in normal for the caliber, it worked fine. It was a semi-reduced load in the bigger cases, and close to full power in the smaller ones. He burned up a LOT of Red Dot playing with that one. Now if he had used 6 grains, results might have been a lot different...........as in a lot LOUDER.

Papajohn
 

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Thanks, I got it. Sometimes things slip right over my head. riverhunter uses a similar load in his big bore for grouse I think and would like to have something similar myself. Life is good, BestLever
 

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Everything I've read suggests that the only way to get in trouble with SEE is to use a slow propellant in a significantly reduced quantity relative to the case size. IOW a powder like one of the 4831s which leaves enough space so that the powder could have its entire surface exposed from base to neck when oriented horizontally. Some powders apparently need to burn progressively through the column to maintain a correct burn speed where others, like the faster powders, can work either through or across the powder without significant issues. The only thing I've seen to be a problem with the slower pistol or faster rifle powders is that you may sometimes get hangfires with them with certain reduced loads. Faster pistol powders, even in very reduced volume, shouldn't give this problem. You can use the slowest rifle powders in a small rifle or pistol as long as the case is full so the powder has the attention of the primer. I suppose one might have difficulty if the case was so small they couldn't get enough pressure to push the bullet out but that doesn't seem to be a problem with rifle cases as small as 222 or revolver cases in the 40s.
 

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There is no problem with using small doses of fast powder with cast bullets. The problem arises with small doses of slow powder and jacketed bullets. The theory that makes the most sense is that a very slight hangfire can occur with the main charge igniting only after the bullet has been solidly lodged in the throat.
 
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