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I just made decision to thin everything way down. I’ve got 100+ sets of dies, not including doubles of several. Not junk tools all top of the line. I been loading since a kid. I decided one time when I was in my 20s to never sell dies, unless multiples. I had sold a rifle with dies and it wasn’t a week before I ended up with another rifle and had to buy dies again. I’ve decided to sell the dies I no longer have a gun for. Starting with dies that I no longer want a gun for. I put up military dies, magnums and some odd balls first and have sold quite a few. I been selling guns too. A hard decision to make but we are all going to have to face it at some point. As far as mental capacity, it’s on individual basis. I know several people who never had the attention span or IQ to reload when they were young.
 

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I'll be 70 this year, and started reloading for SASS this year.
With all the Marxist terror going on today, and living in CA... I am very thankful I am fully setup to reload.
Trail Boss powder is nearly impossible to double charge, and therefore ideal for my use.
 

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I've been reloading since 1975, and consider myself fairly knowledgeable about it. Over the years i have loaded tens of thousands of rounds, and especially love wildcats. However......recently while loading some .257 Roberts, i managed to 'way overcharge a case. Since i'm one of those that weigh each one (plus i visually inspect each case before the bullet goes in), i caught this, and corrected it.
But, i'm getting on in years, and thinking back couldn't see where i might have got that much too much powder in it (over five grains).
So, i decided it was time for me to give it up, which i have. My equipment is going to a young man who is all about learning to reload, and will load anything i want, after i teach him.
Hope i made the right decision..

It takes s lot to change what you’ve been doing all your life!
It’s like loosing a lifelong friend!

While I don’t enjoy it near as much as I used to..... and it’s less interesting than it was, I’m still hanging on to my stuff.
I may need it to help me train a new person and help bring another person into our sport and hobby. Besides, I may need it to make ammo for all my “babies”! (I own a variety of arms).
As long as there are new Bullets and powders to try, I’ll still tinker with reloading.

Yeah, I’ve made my share of mistakes too, but that how people learn. (I know I’ve learned a lot about reloading and firearms since I started reloading at age 15. I’m 63 now.

Hopefully you’ll find out where you went wrong, and then find a way to fulfill your life of dreams!

Good luck to you!


Joe
 

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@Hatch in LA if it bothers you or you are no longer comfortable reloading then it is the right decision for you - and even greater benefit for the person that you helping. We all get to a point where our preferences and hobbies change. No sense in keeping something around that you will not use.
 

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Two things in my life I remember like they were yesterday. My Dad was a trapshooter and he taught me how to load Shotgun shells. He had me loading shells at 10. About the same time he came home with a Sears & Roebuck gasoline lawn mower, it was mine. How lucky could one white boy get. A top of the line Shotgun loading outfit and my own power mower. To this day I would rather mow grass than load shotgun ammo.
 

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I remember when I had to accompany my father, terminally ill, to sell his sailboat, that had always been his dream: sad day, at least_
to this day I would load claymores rather than f'in' around with one of those damn' floating galleys_
I believe that everyone has to deal with their own memories, sooner or later but, as long as I am allowed, the boys do not give up their toys. (with my greatest respect for everyone's choices, common sense to hell)
 

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You mentioned that you just don't have interest in several things anymore. It's natural for a person's interests to change with time. Hopefully you've replaced the motorcycles, mechanics, and reloading with other activities that interest you. Engaging in thoughtful activities and learning new things helps to prevent or postpone development of Alzheimer's Disease. Loss of interest in all things you once enjoyed sometimes is a sign of depression.
 

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I've been reloading since 1975, and consider myself fairly knowledgeable about it. Over the years i have loaded tens of thousands of rounds, and especially love wildcats. However......recently while loading some .257 Roberts, i managed to 'way overcharge a case. Since i'm one of those that weigh each one (plus i visually inspect each case before the bullet goes in), i caught this, and corrected it.
But, i'm getting on in years, and thinking back couldn't see where i might have got that much too much powder in it (over five grains).
So, i decided it was time for me to give it up, which i have. My equipment is going to a young man who is all about learning to reload, and will load anything i want, after i teach him.
Hope i made the right decision..
I am 80 years of age, and have scaled back my hand loading procedure to minimize the chance of serious error.
I now measure powder with a RCBS Little Dandy ,staying with moderate loads. As always,I inspect every
loaded case with a flashlight . I use a scale to verify the Little Dandy charges.
 

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I am old too, and understand you might lose interest. But, due to circumstances right now, I would hold onto you ammo making equipment for a while.

There was a South American country that had a SHTF situation that lasted 3 years. It was very bad. I hope I am wrong but that may happen here. Your family may need that ammo.

There is a guy who wrote a book about it. You had to have someone at home at all times or you would come back to nothing. A fence and dogs outside were a must to give you a warning. No ammo was available. Water supply was short. No help from anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Thank you all for your replies and comments. One very fortunate aspect of this, is that the young man lives just a few miles away, and has offered me unlimited use of the equipment and supplies. As i mentioned earlier, i have a large metal cabinet full of ammo that i suspect will outlast me, so i'm not concerned about running short. Again, thank you ALL for your replies and comments. They are all very valuable.
 
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