Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone here ever experienced a powder charge left in the cylinder after being fired? The bullet entered the barrel with base just short of being flush with the forcing cone. The powder ended flush with cylinder face, as a partially burned plug that came out in one piece. The load was 36grs of H110, 400gr Midway plated bullet, Starline cases, CCI large rifle primers. I"ve never heard of this before. Anyone with ideas or answers to this puzzle?

riflerick
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
454 Posts
I had the same problem in 44 mag with h110 and wolf primers.

go to magnum primers and it should go away
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,099 Posts
The problem is inadequate ignition, which can be caused by several things. jnichol6600 is probably right about a hotter primer being the cure, but there are other factors that may have contributed to the problem. Using a plated bullet might be part of it, the core is very soft lead, and the plating is not as stout as a standard bullet jacket. That means it takes less pressure to move the slug out of the case neck, and if it moves too soon, pressure doesn't build to the proper level for good, consistent ignition. The powder charge fizzles and fuses into a solid mass, as you saw. A firm crimp, a more stoutly-constructed bullet, and a hotter primer will all help to assure you get good shotstart pressure, and a complete powder burn.

Other potential causes include a weak primer or some type of contamination in the case, which makes the powder harder to ignite.

I don't use plated bullets in magnum-class loads, I'm convinced they are too soft and too easily deformed, ruining accuracy. They are designed for softer-shooting loads, particularly pistol loads at target velocities. Some also caution that a firm crimp can also cut into the plating, and a stuck jacket in the bore is an accident waiting to happen.

Stick with hard-cast or jacketed bullets in magnum loads, and save the plated stuff for target loads. 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the help, I plan to pull the bullets and work up some reduced loads, also switch to magnum primers. Thanks again.

riflerick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
With 110 ,#9, 296 you need full loads or you dont get a complete burn. You also need a heavy crimp. and you cannot use a reduced load with these powders. Your load seems a little light for 110. I have no data for a 400grain bullet but a mag primer, and a lee factory crimp die might help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
diggerjake, according to my manual, 36grs of H110 is near max. I"m thinking that I may of had a bad primer as after a considerable number of rounds, this is the first to screw up. I will start using mag primers and play it safe.

riflerick
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,497 Posts
I'm going to chip in on PapaJohn's side.

Plated bullets aren't recommended for magnum speeds. They should be used in place of lead with lead loading data. They aren't a substitute for jacketed bullets. I make it a point not to push plated past around 1200fps. You might get away with 1400fps, but not much more.

A hotter primer should fix the ignition issue too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I"m thinking maybe some differant powder to get MV down for plated bullets, reducing that brutal recoil is not a bad thing. Thanks, I knew I would find the help I needed here.

riflerick
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,099 Posts
Sounds like a good reason to buy some Trail Boss. I don't know what your bullet weight is, but the Hodgdon site has plenty of data.

http://data.hodgdon.com/cartridge_load.asp

Just plug in the data they ask for, and it will give you what you need. They even have a special section for Trail Boss in heavy rifle loads!

Just off the top of my head, nine grains of TB and a 325-grain bullet should give you about 850 fps. 8)
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top