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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In 1964 (or 65) I bought a Winchester Model 77 22. It's the clip fed version as opposed to the tube fed model. Always wanted to know what the wood was like under the dark Winchester finish, so I decided to clean her up a bit and see. first, I thought the stock forearm was disproportionately long for the clip fed version, so I took a 1 1/2" chunk off the front of the stock (that's where I found it was definitely walnut). I took off the old finish with 220 grit sandpaper and formed the front of the cutoff stock. Steel wool (OO) was my friend as I worked thru this process. did use a power sander to form the cutoff stock. After getting down to bare wood, came back with Formby's Tung Oil Finish. While the can recommends overnite between coats, my experience with fine furniture I built from Walnut, Cherry, Ash, and Oak was that after the first coat dries overnite and you steel wool it (OOOO this time) and wipe with a good tack cloth, that successive coats should be applied and let dry to touch and then steel wood again, tack cloth again, and then reapply the tung oil, etc. 6 coats later, this is how she looks. I'm pleased and think the shorter stock looks good with the clip. sorry no before pics -- didn't know it would turn out this good! Later, John


 

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That's pretty John, and I think the forend length is perfect.

Mark.
 

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Man that is really nice. That stock has a good straight grain in the wood and it shows. Forearm looks good too. I think you did an excellent job, Lonnie.
 

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I like it too----nothing like a well executed oiled finish to show off the natural beauty of fine wood. Back in the early 70's in high school the guy who invented Watco came to our shop class and showed us ideas for using his products. That's when I learned to use wet & dry sandpaper and in lieu of steel wool. Same technique that PapaJohn used, but without the possibility of very tiny pieces of steel wool getting shoved into the grain or snagging on your work. Brush on oil, sand with 400 til your hand hurts, wipe off residue, let dry, repeat with 600........ad nauseum. By the time you get to the sixth or eighth or tenth coat with some #2000 w/d paper, you'll end up with an instant heirloom you can be very proud of.

Well done, Sir.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well it didn't hurt the way she shoots! This is at dusk, 25 yards, iron sights, and 69 year old eyes off a simple wooden rest. Minute of squirrel any day of the week -- I'm pleased. John
 
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