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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever sleeved a barrel? The tools seem to be available, but it might be too much for an average tinkerer to take on. I'm not sure if a lathe is important to use. If it is, then I guess I'm out of luck. I read an article at Brownell's web site on sleeving. The barrel he described on his 1889 .38-40 sounds like the one I have, but the rest of the .32-20 seems to be in better shape than the one he has. On a scale of 1 to 100, with 100 being the best, mine is a -5 barrel. So, I just wondered if anyone had tackled this job before? Thanks
 

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Yes I have, on a few .22 rimfires. it's not a job for the average tinkerer, and a lathe is nice, but not an absolute requirement. Most of the time, if you're only going to do one barrel, it's not cheaper to do it yourself.
You have the cost of a liner, the bit to drill the bore out, the extension needs to be welded on the bit, then you need some sort of epoxy like JB Weld, or Acraglass. You will need a chamber reamer to cut the new chamber, and finally some way to cut the extractor notch. The part that makes a lathe handy is trimming the liner flush at each end. Oh, and you'll need a barrel wrench, and barrel vise to hold the barrel and action. If you're not familiar with removing barrels, you might just tweak the receiver, and end up with junk. It's easy to collapse a lever action receiver, if it's not properly supported when wrenching. Also need to index mark it, so it returns to the exact position, or your sights will forever be off.
So you see, it's not impossible, but with all these costs, you better plan to do a few to even break even. Many gunsmiths will do this reasonably, and some of them do such nice work, you can't tell it's been relined.
 

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My 1889 was done by my smith a few years ago, seems someone in it's history boogered up the chamber.
He did an excellent job, you can't tell unless you look real hard. Gun looks correct on the outside, but shoots like a new one at the target. Ran about $250+ including the liner. We discussed just doing the chamber end, but decided the full reline was the best way to go. This one has a round 24" barrel which is quite heavy compared to modern Marlins. Once he was done, I didn't have to do anything to the sights to get back on target. They were just as they had been before..........Buck 8) :roll: :wink: :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, marlinman and four-eyed buck, thankyou for the information. I was afraid that it would be beyond my capabilities, and it is. But I would still eventually like to have it done. Not necessarily to become a shooter, but I think it deserves a little better treatment than what it has gotten in all those years. It may sound crazy, but I see beauty in something that old, and besides it gives me something to do in the winter. Do you guys happen to know someone that will do the job reasonably, and should I buy the sleeve ahead of time? Buck, I see that you are in Canton. Well, I'm in Columbus, so any smith in Ohio that you can think of would be appreciated. Thanks again guys.
 

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Idon't know anyone in Ohio, but the name that always comes up when folks talk about quality reline jobs is Norman Johnson. Locally here, a number of guys have had great jobs from Bienke and Bienke.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, thanks again marlinman for the help. I really do appreciate the information. I could check with the local shop where I bought it. They are a very large dealer, but, they seem more concerned with the selling end than the over all picture. They have trouble finding someone to blue a gun, let alone repair one. Thanks again
 

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Best you let the guy doing the job select the liner and not bother him with the one you pick out..Most of the time they maske their own or have a selected maker in tow..I quit buying my own parts after a darn good smith refused to use the part I had purchased because it was inferior. Kinda like handing a guy your false teeth and telling him to chew with them.Good luck.modoc
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the advice modoc. I have to agree with you, and I realize that any craftsman has to use tools or parts that they have worked with before, and are comfortable using. I guess in my peanut brain, I thought that I would be saving a buck or two if I could pick up the parts one by one. I am not in a big hurry to complete this project as the mechanical end has to be done first before the sleeving. I'm probably thinking too far ahead. And I can only do what I can afford to do. Thanks again as I really wasn't thinking along those lines. You probably saved me a buck or two.
 

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I had my 1889 in .32-20 relined by Randall Redman in Omak, WA. His current prince is $195 for bbls up to 28" (add $15 for bbls. over 28" to 32") plus shipping Contact info:

Redman's Rifling & Reboring
189 Nichols Rd.
Omak, WA 98841
(509) 826-5512
[email protected]

E-mail him first to confirm the cost of the work.

BTW - His liners are sold by Brownell's if you have the equipment to do the work yourself.


Russ
 
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