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How often do you clean your shotgun? I used to have an over and under, I admit to hardly ever cleaning it. Now an auto or even pump is another story. If you dont clean a gas auto from time to time, she will misbehave. Pumps are more forgiving. Some clean every shoot, but others, not so much.

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Back when I was duck hunting with my Browning light twelve 1951 model, I was cleaning it after five hunts if I actually killed any ducks. As for the .410 single shot I was using to hunt rabbits with, after the season. Not much help for you.
 

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I got into the habit of cleaning and oiling my guns after every use. My father being in the Marine Corp used to do this when we went to the range. I got into the habit of cleaning them at the range after shooting while talking with other gun club members while we all cleaned our guns at the end of the day. Then just wipe down and put back in the safe when I got home.
 

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I got into the habit of cleaning and oiling my guns after every use. My father being in the Marine Corp used to do this when we went to the range. I got into the habit of cleaning them at the range after shooting while talking with other gun club members while we all cleaned our guns at the end of the day. Then just wipe down and put back in the safe when I got home.
....after every shot. Every time. I, like Cowboy 23, was schooled at a very young age to shoot by two sergeant majors from British Regiments. One from the Royal Artillery and the other from the Royal Inniskillings. I guess some folk don't care about their equipment.
 

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....after every shot. Every time. I, like Cowboy 23, was schooled at a very young age to shoot by two sergeant majors from British Regiments. One from the Royal Artillery and the other from the Royal Inniskillings. I guess some folk don't care about their equipment.
P.S. When I said 'every shot' I meant if the gun had fired anything at all, not after each individual shot although there are those that do that as well for accuracy.
 

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I've always cleaned my guns after every shooting session, and every hunt. If I were at camp, my rifle/rifles were cleaned when I returned home. If it's good enough for the bench rest shooters, it's good enough for me.

That includes my handguns and my shotguns.

I always wanted to keep that mirror finish inside my shotgun tubes, especially after having one or two older ones that were dulled and had minor pitting, so I cleaned after every outing. I couldn't stand the peppering of burned propellant or the plastic streaks left by the wads. Was any of this detrimental to accuracy? Probably not.

It was a big surprise to me, then, when I took a professional level handgun course, and learned that the instructors only cleaned their own weapons every several thousand rounds. These were nearly all Glocks and S&W M&Ps. These were the instructors' carry, competition, and class instruction weapons. Most had sent tens of thousands of rounds down range.

These guys were confident of their weapons' reliability. They were lightly lubed about once a week or so, (I won't speculate on the lubrication of the instructors themselves, but I digress...) and they were much less often cleaned. The criterion for cleaning seemed to be their hands getting too dirty while shooting. They seemed to think that as long as lubrication was appropriate, they weren't concerned about cleaning.

Regardless, I still clean mine after every session.... I actually enjoy cleaning.
 

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I like to run a bore brush and some oil down the barrel after every shooting. The bolt and receiver parts don’t need it every time but I at least run a toothbrush over the bolt face every once in a while
 

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During duck and pheasant season after each day in the blind/field, I'd spray some WD-40 down each bore followed with a piece of [rag and] rod and put it on the rack. Proper cleaning with solvent, brushes and patches happened when the season was over.

Range shooting, I properly clean after every outing.
 

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I'll blame my parents for my obsessive compulsive cleaning habit... I had it hammered into me from a very young age, if you want something to last, take care of it. Also, if you borrow something return it in better condition and when you got it.

All my firearms were borrowed until I could start buying my own in my 20s. I would zealously clean all firearms until one of the lenders pointed out the damage I was doing by over cleaning. As well as, the fact that somewhat dirty barrels can be more precise shooters. It is still very hard for me to not scrub and polish everything clean.

For shotguns, I clean after every shooting session because I can justify fouling doesn't help with accuracy and brass or aluminum cleaning rods don't do much damage to a shotgun.
 

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Most of the time I just drag a bore snake through barrel 3-4 times, at least every 10 or so rounds at the range for my rifles, and may use the harsh stuff after a hundred or so rounds. When I was shotgunning pretty often, particularly dove hunting, I'd drag the bore snake through the tube after a shooting session. Either rifle or shotgun gets a basic wiping, and maybe a drop or two of oil on the action parts when they need it.

Since I shoot mostly lead in the lever guns, it's a whole different type of cleaning for me. If I have plans to shoot jacketed bullets (which is pretty seldom), I scrub the bore as much as I can both before and after shooting jacketed. I don't like copper fouling. At least copper fouling isn't an issue with the shotguns :)

jd
 

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I was taught gun care by shooters that came from the corrosive primer era so I was taught to clean my firearms every time they were fired. Even one round got an oiled patch down the bore and a wipe down to get the GSR off them.
Since the advent of staynless primers (especially in surplus military ammo) cleaning with Hoppe's or other solvents wasn't as important as getting the burnt powder and copper out of the bore.
Nowdays, I also drag each one out of the safe every 3 months or so and wax them with Johnson's paste wax. Makes a world of difference how well the blue and wood stands up to being in the safe untouched for years sometimes.
 

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Only rifles I am not too concerned about are some of my military weapons that have a chrome plated chamber and bore. Like the SKS or AK 47 or Mil Spec AR Car. The chrome plated guns can handle a lot of abuse and they will not rust but most of my other rifles carry match high end barrels so I clean and oil them.
 

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I have been shooting and cleaning guns for over 40 years. I have a collectible .357 revolver that I’ve had for 39 years. I have shot that thing until the cylinder needed the end shake fixed by S&W. It’s like new now with no damage whatsoever from 39 years of careful cleaning after every session.

A firearm should never be damaged by cleaning it. If that happens something wrong is being done.

 
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