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One thing to remember is that shotgun barrels shorter than 18" are illegal for civilian use; but I wish I could have afforded a "Street Sweeper" before the Feds declared them illegal. They were heavy and ugly, but with it's short barrel and 25 round drum it would have been a devastating defense weapon if someone was being chased by a mob!

"Short Cylinder bore barrels not so great on birds. Unless they pose for you."

Clearly mine and your personal experience is light years apart Friend. My experience with short barreled cylinder bore guns in tight and semi-open cover is that this combination is devastating on birds and small game; and when I was serious about filling my game bag, those were the guns I hunted with. And some of the longest shots I've ever made were with guns having cylinder and skeet chokes.
Years ago I was unloading tables and chairs one night at the church fellowship hall when I was surprised by a guy who wandered in carrying a sawed off 12 bore single shot; looked like he'd been in a serious cat fight. I couldn't run and he was blocking the only exit; so all I knew to do was talk with the guy in an attempt to clam him down. Long story short, he had gotten into an altercation over a drug deal gone bad about a mile away from the church; and he came to the church because he "saw the light on". He was sitting in a pick-up when the guy on the other side of the passenger seat pulled a .38 revolver; so he just instinctively grabbed his loaded "squirrel gun" conveniently laying atop the dash and fired a round as he fell out the driver's side door. The pistol shot missed this guy, but his round hit the other guy just below the collar bone and bored a nice round hole straight thru. This guy survived after being shot with a 12 gauge Remington power piston field load consisting of 1 1/8 ounce of #8 shot. When I gave my report to the on-site smart-ass officer he called me a liar; the guy had been shot with a pistol he claimed. But I was vindicated as another officer called from the hospital to report he been blasted by a shotgun. Point I'm making is that, with today's modern plastic shot cups, you can be guaranteed that whatever your barrel is choked will have a tighter pattern than marked; and also that the shot charge will hold together longer before it begins to spread.
 

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different length for different targets, long heavy barrels are harder to get moving when tired but keep momentum and therefore lead on a moving target. 32inches is a fashion thing as gunmakers have run out of new must haves. My 24 1/2in barrel pump no choke is good on clays etc at sensible ranges. Long shots are not helped by barrel length once over about 24ins, what you need for them is choke to give pattern density cos that is what fails to kill once the correct shot size is established. I also use o/u and s/s around 28in, cant recall the actual size. It all comes down to confidence in what you use.
 

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After tearing up my right shoulder in 1984, it took me a few years to try to shoot again, and never was able after that to pull a bow string. I'm sure I had limited flexibility before, particularly shooting "moving" targets, but really didn't have that much experience shooting anything moving with a shotgun other than squirrels and rabbits. When I first started dove hunting in 2005 I tried several different shotguns, all "regular" 14"+ length of pull and for five or six years had about a 30% shot/kill ratio (or less). Then got to wondering why shotguns, made for moving targets and requiring physical flexibility, were built at a 14"+ LOP while rifles that most often are shot at stationary targets (or slower moving) targets) are built at 13" +/- LOP. So, I was hanging out with one of my ffl buddies in his gun shop one night he pondered the issue a bit then offered me a Mossberg "Bantam" 500, 22" pump in 20 ga for a decent price ... 12"+ LOP. Yep, a short stock. A month or so later I was in our little dove hunting group on our annual jaunt to West Texas and suddenly was shooting closer to 45% in the shot/kill ratio. We only lasted another 4 years or so of this annual dove trip, but I was consistently staying at of above that kill ratio. I know for certain that the shorter barrel was much quicker for me, but (in my case) the short stock was what made the difference ... lots more ability to move in all directions. In my case, I'm NOT an experienced shotgunner, but this was one thing that definitely made a major improvement.

jd
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
Tranteruk this is "Tactical" !. I regret selling a semi-auto one I owned as it was then banned from being owned by regular joes. Mine had the 25 rds drum.

Well, yes and no. For laying down SP, suppressive fire, great. For fire and movement, maybe not so much. That mags going to be huge and heavy, also restrict the use of cover, folds in the ground, vehicles etc. What did a 25 rd drum weigh? What does a fully loaded gun weigh. My idea of a tactical shotgun is pretty close to a standard pump or auto, and as close to 7lbs as possible.

To be clear, I am no expert but learnt from some who knew more then than I do now. The gun should be light, easy to manipulate and fast to the shoulder. Totally reliable but with simple jam clearance drills. Bead only, no rifle sights and no folding stocks. The stock is a blunt weapon that can be employed to considerable effect at close quaters, as can the muzzle. Depending on the role, I also used to vary cartridges, AAA/00 or similar. Because as the guy who taught me said, you may not know what your gonna ask of the gun till you have to ask.

Just my 2 pence. Opinions will vary, not resposible for shrinkage if tumble dried.

Oh, Tom Archer, yes, I accept modern cartridges are far more effecive then they were in my younger days. When I started with shotguns there were no plastic cup wads, just fibre plugs. So no shot retention beyong the muzzle. Good point.
 

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In my limited experience with shotguns I have come to realize fit is more critical than barrel length. Choke is another factor but with modern screw-in chokes that can be adjusted.
I have noticed some shotguns coming with wedges to adjust cast on or cast off. They vary the comb height to the bore. In effect adjust windages and elevation by the shooter. All this without going to a gunfitter and waiting for your gun to be stocked.
 

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I have several shotguns, and hunted ruffed grouse, pheasant and ducks. My favorite duck gun was a 28" barreled Mossberg 835, but they could keep the 3 1/2" mags as it was a bit light weight for that. For ruffed grouse I used my 26" barreled 28 gauge towards the last. For pheasant I really liked a 28" SXS 16 gauge I had picked up. The 16 was also deadly on ducks with ITX shot. (Tungsten shot with polymers to use in old guns with full chokes). for pothole shooting.
The worse gun I tried had 24" barrels and did not have a good balance. This was on ruffed grouse. I never did buy into the short barrel idea on ruffed grouse as when brush busting about anything got tangled up. I had an old 28" barreled SXS 20 gauge with very open IC designated chokes that worked very well on grouse.
As some have alluded things like choke and fit are the most important. I could take a cheap Stoeger SXS out of the box and shoot it very well and had more than one of them. I did like them better after ai worked them over with a rasp to take off the extra weight of wood. I had tried Beretta O?U and they did not fit and would have require rasp work but I preferred not to do so and just sold them off. They had a high comb that was good for clays but lousy for game.
As to the newer screw in choke, I bit on them like every one else but came to realize that a good grouse gun was not a duck gun and vice versa. Pheasants were the birds that gave me the insight into screw in chokes. There would be days when the first couple would flush a bit wild, And then after putting in the full chokes the next one would get up at my feet. None of them ever showed me the consideration of hovering in one place while I changed chokes to fit the situation.
Old guns had more constriction per choke designation. The British choke designations of quarter choke, half choke and full were originally based on .040 full choke constriction. A .01 constriction is now called a weak modified. In the days of card wads and paper hulls it was the improved cylinder. What we see as full choke today is closer to the 3/4 choke or improved modified, which is a very handy steel choke. If you buy a British shotgun that is made by one of their custom makers at about the price of a home mortgage, it will be choked according to a given load as other loads pattern different. I looked at the pattern when selecting loads. I had one shotgun that did not like 4's but loved 5's.

DEP
 

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Funny I run into this thread after a rare time shooting 5 stand last Friday. I used a 24" O/U and first shot top bbl. with a improved modified choke insert. Now wait - getting to the point. Well found out that top bbl would "smoke" the clay or I would miss. The bottom Imp cylinder choke hit most times easily. That was my practice round.

Next round I figured out a bit on how this worked and four other guys showed up. The had exotic long-barreled shotguns both O/U and semi. All had way longer barrels as I viewed them on the same holding rack. Some asked for a harder course, telling me they were experts at this. Two took the same "Green" course of fire as me. I changed the top bbl to another Imp Cylinder choke tube.

I hit 22 of those 25 birds flying in all directions, sometimes at once. None of the other shooters did that well. Maybe I have missed my calling all these decades as I kind of detest shooting shotguns yet own a lot of them that most always are unused.

Was thinking it was the short barrels on the O/U i used that allowed me to move around quickly to pick up and nail those clay birds.
 
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Tranteruk this is "Tactical" !. I regret selling a semi-auto one I owned as it was then banned from being owned by regular joes. Mine had the 25 rds drum.

Tranteruk this is "Tactical" !. I regret selling a semi-auto one I owned as it was then banned from being owned by regular joes. Mine had the 25 rds drum.


When I learned my Daewoo and it's infamous 25 rd. drum rather than registering it I sold to a class III dealer who would turn it into really cool. Made a pretty penny though. My Ithaca 37 suites me well, for game, clay birds, or the most dangerous animal (man)
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
When I learned my Daewoo and it's infamous 25 rd. drum rather than registering it I sold to a class III dealer who would turn it into really cool. Made a pretty penny though. My Ithaca 37 suites me well, for game, clay birds, or the most dangerous animal (man)
I remember the Ithica 37 well. Some said one rail would bind, never ever did. I would buy one now, but hardly ever see them for some reason.
 

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I remember the Ithaca 37 well. Some said one rail would bind, never ever did. I would buy one now, but hardly ever see them for some reason.

We rarely see them for sale either! They are highly sought after.

That one rail deal was is a falsehood! Ithaca engineered it to work which it has done and it's been a falsehood for 84 years! Remington's 870 is always touted it duel rails to be superior to other brands. The 870 is a classic in itself and the 'flimsy' single operating rail o the classic '37 has proven itself for 7/8s of a century!

I've owned both and never had issues for over 40 years. I parted with my 870 towards the kid's kids tuitions and kept the 37. It being a 18" Parkerized law enforcement gun ordered with a special full choke for Florida prison guards towers, a rather useful tool for today.

AC
 

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I own currently approximately 20 or so shotguns from 18 1/2" to 30" SxS's, pumps, autos, O/U's, single shots and previously a lever. Vintage Damascus ones up to current day models. All the gauges except for 10 gauge and 24 gauge. Ithaca 37 was the first shotgun I bought for myself at 16 back in '74. Regretted selling it many years ago but I did acquire a 60's vintage 37 in 16 gauge a couple years back. I like them all but for hunting prefer the break opens with 26" to 30" barrels. Straight English stock preferably. When I die they will have on hell of a tag sale, it is a shame you can't them with you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Gunscrewguy, my Ithica was also pakerized and had 'rough' oil finished wood. Re the single action bar, many an current pump and auto uses one bar, and they never seem to have any binding issues. I agree with you, totally false.
 

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Anyone partial to a particular length of 12b Brl? Like many here I have shot shotguns for many years. Almost 50 in my case and I know what I like, 24" - 26". Birds, rabbits and mostly, sporting clays. I find long barrels awkward, but others tell me the long barrels (28"+) help with the 'swing'. To me they feel like waving a telegraph pole around, but maybe thats the rifleman in me talking.

Anyone have suggestions or points I have missed. What do you prefer?
Yep 18.5“ Mossberg for 2 legged intruders
 

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Anyone partial to a particular length of 12b Brl? Like many here I have shot shotguns for many years. Almost 50 in my case and I know what I like, 24" - 26". Birds, rabbits and mostly, sporting clays. I find long barrels awkward, but others tell me the long barrels (28"+) help with the 'swing'. To me they feel like waving a telegraph pole around, but maybe thats the rifleman in me talking.

Anyone have suggestions or points I have missed. What do you prefer?
Personally, I prefer longer barrels. 28 or 30 inch. They seem to come to target faster for me and the swing seems smother than with the shorter barreled guns I use to have. Git rid of them all. But, for what it's worth, it really is what you get use to and if you give yourself the honest chance to overcome the mental block, you may like longer better. Problem usually is......usually, our thick skulls WON'T let us try . I am a 98% plus shooter with a side by side......put an over n under in my hand and that drops to 80% on a good day. Mental block I CANNOT overcome. Ps.....got rid of 2 $2500 over n unders last year!!!😁 So , if ya wanba try just fer shits n giggles, go for it with a true open mind. If yer comfortable with what ya got......stick with it. Let em judge ya after ya outshoot em with 24" barrels. Enjoying yourself is the win!!!
 

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Personally, I prefer longer barrels. 28 or 30 inch. They seem to come to target faster for me and the swing seems smother than with the shorter barreled guns I use to have. Git rid of them all. But, for what it's worth, it really is what you get use to and if you give yourself the honest chance to overcome the mental block, you may like longer better. Problem usually is......usually, our thick skulls WON'T let us try . I am a 98% plus shooter with a side by side......put an over n under in my hand and that drops to 80% on a good day. Mental block I CANNOT overcome. Ps.....got rid of 2 $2500 over n unders last year!!!😁 So , if ya wanba try just fer shits n giggles, go for it with a true open mind. If yer comfortable with what ya got......stick with it. Let em judge ya after ya outshoot em with 24" barrels. Enjoying yourself is the win!!!
 

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Hello All!

I've always wanted the Marlin 120 with a 40" barrel... . I missed out on an auction earlier this year, BUT recently settled for a Marlin 120 with a 38" barrel.

I shot three rounds to ensure that it cycled shells properly and took it to the local gunsmith to have thin-wall choke tubes installed. and the trigger adjusted to just over 5 lbs.

The barrel WAS 38 inches.. but, unfortunately, when installing the choke tubes, the sidewall of the barrel blew out..
SO, I now have a Marlin 120 with 36 1/4" barrel... (with choke tubes)...

STILL A GREAT skeet gun, I shoot a lot of LOW GUN (vintage) skeet, so, station 8 is a lot of fun.

I've shot 6 or 7 rounds of skeet so far... (on one round I broke 22 and dropped 3 high house 6 birds...How do you do that???? )

The last two rounds were both 24s (dropped High 2 and low 6)...

Love the old gun...From what I can tell, it was made in 1980 according to the serial number.

Still searching for the 40.
Maggs
Jeans Sky Cloud Plant Tree
 
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