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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
me and two galfriends went on a hike last Sunday right after the week - long freeze and while there was about 4" of new snow on the ground and still falling. The forest service ranger guy and gal at the start of the trail who just happened to be there said not to go on that trail today; there's lots of ice under the snow.

We were going to just 'check it out.' Spring fever, you know. Plus, two of us had hip - hopped and skidded a few miles up a very icy trail a couple weekends before, however, we could SEE the ice on that hike.

So, off we go, slip-sliding away, crawling up around on the hill beside the trail a time or two to get around a little ice flow from a frozen creek that was crossing the trail.

Finally when we'd gone way too far to want to back track, as the trail was a loop, and we were probably 2/3 of the way through it, we came upon an impassable ice flow that stretched 15 feet ahead before we could safely arrive next to a cable fence-railing once again. (Impassable? Well, Pretty Much so! by my definition . . .) A slip off the edge probably wouldnt' have killed us, but probably could have broke something. And, of course, there's the probelm as to whether whoever slipped would ever be able to get back on the trail as it was quite steep and slippery. (Of course, there were trees and bushes on the hillside to fall into or it would have been out of the question in the first place.)

One of us (not me!) slid quickly across the ice flow on her belly and grabbed the cable on the other side, and then let us know she really barely grabbed the cable in time to not slide off the trail.

There was no way she could come back across, as the incline was downwards slightly, towards her, and there was nothing to pull her back across with. (Oh, pack a ROPE on a weekend day-hike in case we need it?)

Well, anyways, my other galfriend who's braver than me was scared to follow, and at that point --- I realized I was really scared. How did I let us get into this fix, anyway?

We could have slowly, carefully, took the long way back the way we came but we couldn't split up our group with only one of us going down the unknown route to who knows what other kind of treacherous barrier lay up ahead.

So finally, my brave friend on this side of the ice flow said she was climbing up the hillside to see if there was a safer place to pass across and then come down and drop onto the trail. Drop-slide, kind of, it was almost perpendicular at the part nearest the trail, and the hill was a solid lumpy ice-flow down to and across the trail, but there was the cable-rail at the outer edge of the trail to grab onto.

She went down, with me following her path both up and down quite a ways behind, and the end result was a point of no return --- the one and only choice WAS to grab hold of a small sturdy tree trunk that happened to be growing there, and hold your hand around it real tight 'cuz you're gonna HANG from it til you work up the courage to let GOT of it and drop-slide to the trail, which was a fast enough action due to the ice-flow that you could drop-slide right underneath the cable through the 2 1/2 foot space between the cable and the ground, and not have time to grab the cable to make sure your trip ENDS at your destination! (Which was ON the trail rather than off the edge of the hill.)

I was so scared I couldn't stop my knees from knocking and I forgot to pray but luckily being the last one to make the drop I was given the gracious suggestion by my friend to drop and then slide into her to keep from falling off the trail. (I had not been close enough to be able to see how SHE had managed to maneuver herself down there without someone to catch her as our other friend had wandered further not knowing where we were coming down.)

Obviously I lived to tell the tale! I slid **BAM!** into her, lost my hat and my water bottle went flying off into space but was unhurt and unbruised and so was she! We did a careful slow journey toward the end of the trail sometimes crawling on our hands and knees, sometimes sliding on our bellies, all in the name of safety first, to heck with how wet and slushy we got!

It was a good reminder, even the most cautious (ME!), and supposedly SOMEWHAT seasoned hikers can get into trouble unexpectedly.

DidI learn anything:

When your gut instinct tells you to turn around, and not take a hike (mine did, I told them, they wouldn't listen) -- take heed!

And when some forest service employees happen to see you before you start your hike and suggest that you not go --- take heed!

I won't forget my lesson. Guess I needed to learn it.
 

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Yep, happens all the time. Those people screened, background checked, hired, trained and with the knowledge and willingness to put their butts on the line to protect and serve you are ignored with no more consideration than you would give Yoggi Bear. Some people can learn simply from reading. Some learn from seeing the mistakes of others. Some learn from the advice of the knowing. Some learn only from their own stubborn mistakes. Then, if the worst happens (and I'm glad it didn't for you) they rip and criticize, if not sue, the "Forest Service people" for not preventing their self-inflicted pain. For those people, I can find no sympathy.
 

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41Retro said:
Yep, happens all the time. Those people screened, background checked, hired, trained and with the knowledge and willingness to put their butts on the line to protect and serve you are ignored with no more consideration than you would give Yoggi Bear. Some people can learn simply from reading. Some learn from seeing the mistakes of others. Some learn from the advice of the knowing. Some learn only from their own stubborn mistakes. Then, if the worst happens (and I'm glad it didn't for you) they rip and criticize, if not sue, the "Forest Service people" for not preventing their self-inflicted pain. For those people, I can find no sympathy.

8)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
41Retro said:
Yep, happens all the time. Those people screened, background checked, hired, trained and with the knowledge and willingness to put their butts on the line to protect and serve you are ignored with no more consideration than you would give Yoggi Bear. Some people can learn simply from reading. Some learn from seeing the mistakes of others. Some learn from the advice of the knowing. Some learn only from their own stubborn mistakes. Then, if the worst happens (and I'm glad it didn't for you) they rip and criticize, if not sue, the "Forest Service people" for not preventing their self-inflicted pain. For those people, I can find no sympathy.
Okay, okay! I take my 30 lashings with humility. I have heard enough stories around here to know better than to take stupid risks and then I found myself doing it anyway.

But around here, what you do out in nature is nobody's liabliity but your own. And it's not unheard of for people to unexpectedly die during a routine day outing. Nature is breathtakingly beautiful and also unforgiving.

Not to say we would have died but we might have gotten injured.
 

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Yep.. your just lucky you lived to tell about it..
 

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There are always lessons learned.

That which doesn't kill you, makes you stronger. Next time you'll be able to stand up and tell your hiking party that, "No, I am not going." or you'll bring some rope so you can traverse the trails better. :)
 

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All I can do is shake my head.

The best tool you can have when enjoying the wilderness is a brain.

It costs the taxpayers quite a bit for search and rescue teams for those who insist on going out there unarmed (and I'm not talking firearms in this case).

http://cohp.org/emergency/AK_SAR_data.html

If your story was meant as a warning, I doubt anyone here needs to be told the obvious. If it was stupid going out against the Forest Service person's advice, the stunt you clowns pulled to get across the ice was downright moronic.

The state of AK would serve itself well to set up a fund to send you tree huggers back to the lower 48 where the most danger you'll be to yourselves and others is jaywalking between latte shops.
 

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"If it was stupid going out against the Forest Service person's advice, the stunt you clowns pulled to get across the ice was downright moronic."

Yup.......takes one to know one i suppose~

and once again, the big voice of authority booms across the world....
 

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What's the matter, Kaintuck, did some teenager in skimpy clothing call you gramps when you drooled at her today?

Way too much money is spent on the search and rescue of fools, or can you deny that as well?

You might wanna visit gunchicks.com to improve your mood. You won't find Nomer's pic there though. She is afraid of guns by her own admission.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Re: There are always lessons learned.

Red Ryder said:
That which doesn't kill you, makes you stronger. Next time you'll be able to stand up and tell your hiking party that, "No, I am not going." or you'll bring some rope so you can traverse the trails better. :)
This was (just about) the first hike I've been on where I realized a rope would have been danged handy! There were very few times when hiking up mountain trails in the summertime I had a moment here or there where I was slightly apprehensive but usually if I'm skeered to go, well I won't go!!!

But yep -- that which doesn't kill us makes us stronger, and sometimes, smarter.

Watch out for them lookers, Kaintuck! Some of them got . . . .


. . . . well, need I say more!
 
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