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Scheduled for a Wyoming elk hunt in the sagebrush foothills of the Bighorns in September. Considering a .338 MX purchase to take along. The shots will likely be 200-300 and not many trees out there to rest against. I will be practicing some from a seated position using my knees to stabilize, but I might like to take a pair of shooting sticks along if MO opinion on them runs high.

Anyone have any experience with shooting off the sticks for out west hunting ? If so, any recommendations on good make, model and size to buy?

I anticipate that we'll be out glassing, moving and glassing more until we find what we're looking for at an acceptable range. Some of the time, I'll be on foot and other times I'll be on horseback (in case that factors into getting the right sticks).

Knowing nothing about them, I'd lean toward something small and portable suitable for use back here in Virginia on whitetails as well. I have a late 1700s German Jager rifle (reproduction) in .54 with open sights with which I could use a pair of sticks for longer shots.

Thanks,
Night Wasp
 

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Hey there Night Wasp -- Shoot me a PM with an e-mail address and I'd be glad to send you a brochure on the ones we build. Wet Dog has some video's up in the sticky section of the 32-40. 38-55, 375 and....thread where you can see them being used. Got some ready to go. Best regards. Wind
 

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You can easily make your own to your wants and need. I did by using 3/4x3/4" square dowels, a wing nut and screw from Menards, and an old leather belt from Goodwill.

I cut the sticks to an equal height that would allow me to shoot from a kneeling or sitting position. Drill holes in both sticks equidistant, the same diameter as the screw, cut some leather into two strips the same width as the sticks, making them as long as you want, and epoxy to the sticks. This will protect your gun and keep the gun from squeeking against the wood. Take the section of belt with the sizing holes intact and screw one end of the belt to the wood about halfway down from the pivot point of the nut. Now put another screw that the belt holes will fit over,into the other stick at the same level. This will keep the legs from spreading farther than you want them to depending on what position your shooting from.

This is just how I made them, use your imagination. I think it cost me $7.00 total, and they work great.

Andrew
 

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I would think that weight would be a consideration especially if there is a lot of walking involved. Maybe some of those sticks that fold up and carried on the waist would be better?
 

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I have stony point shooting sticks.They are lightweight,fold like tent poles,and are very steady at those ranges for $30-40.
 

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Should be a great Hunt! Remember Post Pictures. Good Luck finding a good 338ME! But if You do let us know as they are rare, everyone that has a good one is hanging on to them and Remington can't figure out how to build them!
 

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dave4570 said:
I have stony point shooting sticks.They are lightweight,fold like tent poles,and are very steady at those ranges for $30-40.
I have used them for some very difficult shots in our sage flats/short grass prairies, and for Prairie dogs in WY. I started out with a homemade pair of dowels from Home Depot, then the folding kind, then several from different coyote hunters suggestions, and a scoping pair for sitting to standing positions. I have shot game in South Africa and West Texas with tripod standing sticks too. My dad always taught me that "a good rifleman knows how to find a good rest". I have also, for quick shots, where the sage was too high to sit/kneel, grabbed a handful of sage, rested my forearm on same hand, and slightly leaned back for some tension, works much better than just off hand. However, do practice alot offhand as out here, you never know what kind of shot you will get! I would say for every long range shot opportunity, you will get a dozen at closer range. As I get older (read stiffer!) I don't try to sneak around as much, so my shots tend to get longer. ha I highly recommend shooting sticks.
 

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I would look at the Primos Trigger Stick. They are a real nice unit. I have the tripod unit. They adjust for height with the squeeze of the trigger on the handle. I have used several bipod units, but it never fails it is NEVER at the right height for the shooting situation you have at hand.
 

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The Trigger Sticks are the best way to go. I have the bi-pods & had to practice alot to get use to them. Being from Texas, I have mainly hunted out of blinds with nice rests, but when I moved to Wyoming for a couple yrs I learned to shoot from sticks. Good luck & practice, practice, practice. I have a 338MXLR and that would be an awesome gun for the Elk Hunt. It'll shoot 300-400 yds with no problems, just practice off the sticks and all will be good. Good luck, God Bless, and start working out now for that hunt.
 

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big medicine said:
I would look at the Primos Trigger Stick. They are a real nice unit. I have the tripod unit. They adjust for height with the squeeze of the trigger on the handle. I have used several bipod units, but it never fails it is NEVER at the right height for the shooting situation you have at hand.
+1 On the trigger stick. Doubles as a adjustable walking staff with the legs strapped together. I bought a cheap leather carbine scabbard to carry mine on horseback. Fom
 

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I like the stiffer sticks myself, when I use any. Seems like the slimmer tent pole stuff is not real steady. Just my preference.
Practice, practice, practice, and get in shape. When I was guiding elk hunters (did some in the Big Horns as a matter of fact), the guys who got in shape and practiced had fun and more success. The fellows who showed up with two pallets of beer and a rifle that they didn't shoot much tended to sit in camp by the fire and nurse sore muscles and complain about the shots they missed.
I remember one group coming out. One guy came in to camp with a brand new Weatherby in 300 Mag (bore sighted and unshot) the other had his trusty old pump Remington carbine in 308 that he'd used for years. The first gentleman missed everything he shot at (imagine that). Second gentleman dropped a bull elk with one shot at a little over 250 yards and a mule deer at about 75 yards with one shot. He used two shells and filled his tags. Told me that he'd put over 500 rounds through that little rifle during the summer shooting woodchucks and crows. Paid off for him.
Have fun.
 
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