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Been making some home made knives of late. I've had an interest in semi traditional methods and materials. Some of the knives I've been working on are sort of a cross between a traditional butcher knife, ala Old Hickory, but in a smaller, 4" blade format like a modern hunting knife. I usually use brass pins, dark wood handles, and blued steel blades.

I like to do an oil finish on the handles. Boiled linseed oil, tru oil, whatever. While waiting impatiently for a coat of Tru Oil to dry, I put in the oven to bake it. That really got me to thinking.

Cast Iron frying pans are 'seasoned'. Muzzle loader bores are 'seasoned'. But why shouldn't a knife blade (or even the handle) be seasoned as well? I put the oil on the handle, blade, and put it back in the oven to bake at 350*. I waited a bit, buffed it with a cloth, and hit it with more oil, and let it go another 10-20 minutes.

Last, I took the knives out and put wax on them. Minwax finishing wax is what I had on hand, so it's what I used. The wax, on encountering hot wood, brass, and steel, melted and ran down into any cracks, crevices, and crannies in the handle area. When it cooled and dried, I buffed it with a soft cloth.

The resulting finish reminds me of a seasoned cast iron skillet. Ever seen a seasoned cast iron skillet rust? Me neither.

Anybody ever fool around with this type of finish on a knife or gun? I'm thinking this will be durable and corrosion proof for a long, long time.
 

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I've not encountered this in steel finishing, but like you, I've seen it used on wood. You may be on to something here, please let me know how it turns out. Pictures?

MM
 
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