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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I mounted a new scope on my 336 and went to sight it in this weekend.The gun shoots great 1" groups at 50 yds. I love this gun.
It is mounted using weaver bases and rings.
(This scope was previously mounted on my 30/06 and holds a great zero.)
Now for the problem, my elevation is good but I ran out of adjustment left and right. So my sight picture is dead on up and down but it need to go right 6 more inches. How do I fix this? I have heard of shimming bases
up and down but how do you fix left and right?[/u]
 

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If you switch to a Leupold or Redfield style "windage adjustable" base, you can dial in a lot of windage with the base itself. This is the base you see that has the two coin slotted screws on each side of the rear of the base. They work well. I'm not sure how one would go about correcting windage with a Weaver style base. Shims might work but I can't tell you how to go about it.

Try a Leupold base and ring setup, I am certain it will solve your problem. They are very tight and secure mounts, made of steel and not terribly expensive, but more than the Weaver.
 

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Are you using a one or two piece base? If it is a two piece you might try dismounting them and remounting them. It is possible for two piece bases to be slightly out of alignment with each other. Usually not something you can see with the eye but enough to make a difference.

If it is a one piece base it still might not hurt to try that. If your rings don't line up in the notches just right your scope could shift off of the barrel axis when you tighten them down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am using a 1 piece weaver base. Looking at the burris and leupold
windage adjustable bases look like they will correct my problem. Thanks for the help.
 

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Don't forget to center the windage adjustment on your scope prior to installing it in the new rings/base. That way you can set the initial windage using the mount, and retain your full range of windage adjustment in your scope. You'll have the widest range of adjustment that way. Let us know how it works.
 

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TXsurveyor

Been down the same road - in the 70's when we were just getting serious about Marlins we had the same problem (or a related one: where one tries to move a scope/base btwn two 336's - on one gun the scope would zero, and on the 2nd would do fine hitting the targets to the right or left of ours). Since then been using Redfield or more lately Leupold bases... and have been a very happy camper. Of note, if you're shooting slow lead, before you mount the scope, you might add a couple "post-it" "shims" either under the rear of the base (as it attaches to the receiver), or on the top of the bottom half of the rear ring (ie, btwn the ring and the scope) - something like each post-it will raise the POI at 50yrds by 4". For most of our slow lead scopes we go with 2 or 3 post-its. Btwn the post-its and using the base to obtain most of the zero, we're able to keep most of our scopes in the middle of their zero'ing range (and for cheap scopes this is important).

ps. the post-it's are nice in that by using glued area of each post-it, they'll stay put while one is mucking with positioning the scope and/or base.

pps. the post-its will leave a hint of color (pink, yellow, green, purple etc) either btwn the base and the receiver, or under the scope... which always has people asking "is that some trick scope setup"... and then we rain on their parade and tell them: no, just post-it shims.

do shoot straight,
greg
www.gmdr.com
 

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Weaver Type Rings

Whenever you use Weaver Rings or something that mounts like them you have to take note of the fact that sometimes it makes a difference on which side of the base the locking screw is placed. I.e. the ring is pulled tight to the mount base on the side oppisite that on which the screwhead is placed. If you run out of windage put a collimater in the barrel and note how the sscope's POI locks on the collimater. Next take the scope off of the base and put the screw head on the other side of the rifle. Without changing the scopes adjustment notice how the scopes POI changes without touching its adjusstments. The other thing to do is use the Millet Angle-lock rings with their two opposing screws. If you use Angle-locks remember to push the screw to the front of the slots in the base, center the reticle for windage within the scope, and then center the scope for POI with the collimater using one ring snugged to the scope. Then tighten the other ring to the base being careful not to stress the scope diagonally.
Hope this is all clear.
 

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Weaver Type Rings

Whenever you use Weaver Rings or something that mounts like them you have to take note of the fact that sometimes it makes a difference on which side of the base the locking screw is placed. I.e. the ring is pulled tight to the mount base on the side oppisite that on which the screwhead is placed. If you run out of windage put a collimater in the barrel and note how the sscope's POI locks on the collimater. Next take the scope off of the base and put the screw head on the other side of the rifle. Without changing the scopes adjustment notice how the scopes POI changes without touching its adjusstments. The other thing to do is use the Millet Angle-lock rings with their two opposing screws. If you use Angle-locks remember to push the screw to the front of the slots in the base, center the reticle for windage within the scope, and then center the scope for POI with the collimater using one ring snugged to the scope. Then tighten the other ring to the base being careful not to stress the scope diagonally.
Hope this is all clear.
 

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Weaver Type Rings

Whenever you use Weaver Rings or something that mounts like them you have to take note of the fact that sometimes it makes a difference on which side of the base the locking screw is placed. I.e. the ring is pulled tight to the mount base on the side oppisite that on which the screwhead is placed. If you run out of windage put a collimater in the barrel and note how the sscope's POI locks on the collimater. Next take the scope off of the base and put the screw head on the other side of the rifle. Without changing the scopes adjustment notice how the scopes POI changes without touching its adjusstments. The other thing to do is use the Millet Angle-lock rings with their two opposing screws. If you use Angle-locks remember to push the screw to the front of the slots in the base, center the reticle for windage within the scope, and then center the scope for POI with the collimater using one ring snugged to the scope. Then tighten the other ring to the base being careful not to stress the scope diagonally.
Hope this is all clear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well I tried to mount it turning the rings around. No help. I switched the side the screws mounted on. No help. So I pulled the darn thing off and left it off. Now I am excited about trying to take my first deer without a
scoped rifle!!!! After hunting for 10 years and killing 20-25 deer with a scoped gun I am going to try it the old way. And I cannot wait. So if
all goes well I will not mount a scope on it at all. If not, after this season
I will get a windage adjustable set up for it. I will let ya'll know.
 

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gmushial,

All my slow lead loads impact MUCH higher than faster loads. Wouldn't I want to put my shims under the front base instead of the rear? The WGRS on my 1895G is so low now that the elevation slide is tightened against the receiver instead of the sight base. Shimming the rear sighting device (or rear of scope) would make the problem worse, wouldn't it? I might be wrong. I respect and appreciate your work and have learned a great deal from you.

Live well
 

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Millett also makes a simple strong steel adjustable set of rings. And much cheaper...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If I decide to go back to the scope I will try the millet angle lock (windage
adjustable) rings. That way I can still use my weaver base.
 

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Cut two thickness of a pop can and bend them to fit the angle of the clamping area on the base, trim to the proper size, place on the opposite side of the clamp screw (front left side) unless your clamp screw is on the left side if clamp screws are on the left, place your shims on the right side rear, this should give you the proper windage you need.
 

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Swany,

Good idea. The only change I suggest is to use a single piece of material folded like this:



This way the tip of the base clamp edge will not bottom out in the groove in the ring, which might cause instability. You want V-block style interface here, not point-of-contact.

How's things in Howard City? Ready for archery deer season? I am.

Live well.
 
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