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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not being that familiar with the old Marlins, I'm not sure what a saddlering carbine would look like. I just ran across an ad for a barrel in 32/20 for the 1889 or 1894 Marlin. It stated that the barrel is in new condition with bright blue at 98 to 99 percent. And that it had never been on a receiver. It didn't specify if it was octagon or smooth. Also it didn't specify the length, but I assume the carbine was a standard length.
 

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Most carbines were a 20" barrel, but not all. A small number were in 15", and that barrel is not allowed to be put on any receiver that isn't on the list Bill Brophy gave to BATF years ago.
If the barrel is a 20", it may not necessarily be for a carbine (saddlering or standard) It could also be a 20" octagon or round rifle barrel.
You'll need to check with the seller, to confirm it's for a carbine. Saddlering carbine barrels should have a front sight, or sight base built into the barrel on model 1894, or 2889 carbines. If this barrel doesn't have the complete front sight, or at least the base, it is not for a carbine, or it's been modified.
Best to contact the seller for confirmation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Marlinman, I wasn't thinking about buying the barrel, as $400 is a little steep for me, as that was the price. But, thats probably an average price for something of that time period. I was just curious as to what it looked like. I don't have any books or pictures along those lines. So until I can find good and accurate reference material, I'm stuck asking questions I really hate to ask. But, at 65 I think I've found a hobby I'm really going to enjoy. You guys will just have to bear with me for a while. And it'll probably take me all winter to try to refurbish the 89' 32/20 I started on last week. I'm in no hurry, as I am taking my time, and enjoying the frustrations of trying to find internal parts. And it feels nice to use my hands again. Thanks
 

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The carbine barrels are much lighter weight than other round or octagon rifle barrels. They generally have very thin walls on these barrels. Rear sight dovetails are also in a different position.
I'm not sure the price of $400 is really any bargain, but these barrels don't come available often. I've seen two nice 100% Marlin barrels for 1893's, and I bought both of them. I don't think I've ever seen one offered for a model 1894 at any price that was a nice barrel.
One of the 1893 barrels I bought was a .38-55 carbine, and the other a .32-40 octagon rifle. The carbine went fast at $300 years ago. I still have the rifle barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I happen to stumble across Merz Antiques the other day, and I started browsing. I gathered that they dealt mostly with Winchesters, but they also have a select group of Marlins. One engraved 1881 was going for $35,000 if memory serves me correct. They also had lower priced Marlins, but still more than I would want to pay. Photos were posted for the more expensive models. Interesting, but strictly for looking at.
 

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Yep, Leroy deals in all sorts of lever guns, and at all conditions. His prices reflect the condition, and I've been told he's negotiable, if he's had something for awhile. He's had that 1881 for some time, but still way out of my class!
 
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