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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys, I have a couple of older guns that have small rust spots on them, they were there when I bought them. My question is how do you remove these small spots or do you just keep them oiled because they are small? I don't want to get aggressive with steel wool or anything like that because the spots are small and I don't want to lighten the surrounding bluing. If you just remove the loose rust and take care of the gun it shouldn't get worse, or will it? Thanks!
 

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I have had quite a few firearms that were purchased during various stages of oxidation. To remove heavy rust, I use a piece of brass and gun oil. Put some oil on the rust and scrape the scale off with the brass. Brass will not harm any remaining finish. After scraping the rust, clean the area well with a rag and reg'lar gun solvent. Also, when you remove rust this way, any patina will be left behind. Using products made of steel to remove rust will also damage any natural aging of the metal. I have also used tons of bronze wool and oil. You would be amazed at what will come off an old rifle, and what still remains. Once you remove all the rust, keep the gun oiled on a regular basis and you should be fine. Good luck!
 

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Roundsworth has the ticket.One must remember,the bluing is IN the steel,not ON the steel.SOOoo the brass being softer than steel does no harm to either.I have found that the brass or copper or bronze brushes sold at MOST gun shops is the fastest and easiest way to get those little spots of rust under control.Liberal doses of BREAKFREE works well for me and helps soften the spots. If speed is your main concern,leave it alone.Takes time, but really is worth the effort. Good luck.modoc
 

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Use the edge of a penny! It's easy, and handy. If it's really stubborn, I use the edge of a dime, as the serrations work a bit better. Either one wonthurt the gun's finish.
 

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As an added note: I am not an expert on cleaning the wood components, but here is what I did to my Grade C 1st Variation Model 1898......I used plain ol' Pledge furniture cleaner and a t-shirt to remove gobs of old skin oil, sweat, etc. The checkering is pretty decent and the "nicely figured select" walnut looks great, especially in true sunlight! I even discovered what I believe to be quite a bit of the original varnished finish. I assume it is varnish because it is on top of the wood, not like a hand-rubbed oil finish. I have done a few stocks with tung oil, and this is definitely not an oil finish. As long as I don't have checkering to contend with, I can work with wood without apprehension!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the reply's everyone! I have been using Clenzoil on my older guns, what do you guys use??
 

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I use a concoction that was given to me by the armourer on our shooting team. It's base is regular old ATF as used in your car. The other components are Hoppe's #9, and STP.
The armourer told me that the ATF which is the largest component of this, is impervious to heat and moisture, while the STP is great for bearing surfaces, and the Hoppe's is simply a thinner.
I've been working on the same gallon mixture for 20 years, and so far it's the best thing I've found to keep the surfaces free of rust, and working smoothly.
 

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marlinman93 said:
I use a concoction that was given to me by the armourer on our shooting team. It's base is regular old ATF as used in your car. The other components are Hoppe's #9, and STP.
The armourer told me that the ATF which is the largest component of this, is impervious to heat and moisture, while the STP is great for bearing surfaces, and the Hoppe's is simply a thinner.
I've been working on the same gallon mixture for 20 years, and so far it's the best thing I've found to keep the surfaces free of rust, and working smoothly.
MM et al,
A truly wonderfull product IMHO for this kind of work is "Marvel Mystery Oil". Like the concoction above, I think it's essentially a thinned out ATF with the addition of some spearmint oil. Penetrates well, and makes a fine barrel cleaner too, NO silicone! Find it in the automotive department at your local parts store, Wally World around here carries it.
Cheers,
R*
Ps. There's always Ed's Red as well, ATF, mineral turpentine and some lacquer thinners or acetone, vary viscosity to suit the job at hand. Watch out with the thinnners on wood finishes though.
 
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