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Just purchased a Glenfield model 30A .30-30 at a pawn shop a couple of weeks ago for $195.00. It is the first lever action I have ever owned, after wanting one for years. The gun was in fair condition (few light rust marks on the exterior metal), and the wood was in fair shape. I checked out the bore with a mini flashlight, and it looked okay in the store, just a little dirty. It appeared to have been shot some, and then put up. After getting the rifle home, and breaking everything down. I gave the gun a thorough cleaning, especially the barrel. My initial cleaning with Hoppe's #9 and a dray patch revealed what looked like a good bore with good rifling. I decided to let the Hoppe's #9 sit for a day or two in the barrel, and then worked the inside of the barrel with a copper bore brush. After that I cleaned it again with Hoppe's # 9, and this time I notice some light pitting in the spaces between the rifling near the muzzle. It does not appear to have affected the rifling itself, which I assume was glazed over with copper fouling. I assume the powder residue had also filled in the light pitting.

The question is, how much can I expect this issue to affect the gun's accuracy? Also, I bought the gun to carry around on a 4 wheeler and haul through the brush as a hog gun. I knew I would get sweat, dirt and grime on it, so I was not looking for a show piece, but had hoped the barrel would be in good shape. Should I try and sell it, and look for a "better" rifle, or is the price, condition, and purpose sufficient for me to keep it. By the way, I have not had a chance to even shoot the gun.
 

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A little pitting on the lands/grooves may not hurt a thing, and it may throw off accuracy 100%. I have a Finn M28 with a SIG barrel, 943rd SIG barreled M28 out of the first shipment to leave august of 1928 to the finnish civil guard, and issued to a guardsman in Susa Soumi. The rifle has seen combat and has some honest wear, and has a little bit of pitting at the end of the muzzle, not severe, maybe minor to moderate pitting, and it is one of the best shooting Mosins I have. As long as you have strong lands and grooves through out the rest of the bore, I think it should be fine. If you want you could always take it to a gunsmith and have him hack off the end of the barrel right before the pitting if its just right at the muzzle. Shouldn't cost you too much.
 

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I'm new here too, but I would just say shoot it and see how it groups at a reasonable yardage - say, 25 yards to start.

If it's accurate enough to shoot a hog "in the brush" then it should be fine.

Nobody's going to be looking at the bore but you; certainly the hogs won't care ;)
 

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I doubt you will have any accuracy issues, however cleaning may become more complicated or take longer. Even though the pits will fill with jacket material or lead as you shoot, if you don't remove it that will be a place for moisture to develop under the fouling and result in more rust and greater pitting. Try using Kroil penetrating oil to soak the bore, it will get under fouling that traps in the pits and help you get it out.

It should work well for the intended purpose.
 

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Usually as long as the muzzle isn't dinged up it shouldn't hurt accuracy. Chances are the bullet will just pass over the pitting like it wasn't there. Since it's destined to become a working gun for your atv, the suggestion about cutting the barrel down is a good one. I'd love to pick up an old beater just so I can cut the barrel down to 16 1/4", and install either fiber optic sights or a scout scope. Maybe even one of those XS scout rails with ghost ring sights. Congrats on the new Glenfield and welcome to MarlinOwners.
 

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To use as you stated......... I`d just clean it up as much as possible and put it in service!
I`ll bet you`ll get great results... :)
 

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Just for reference, I have a .303 British Enfield that my Grandfather picked up at some point. It is no telling how old and the bore looks like a sewer pipe. I tried everything from wipe-out to flitz to try and clean it and never could get anywhere with it.....and then found out later that some of these rifles were used with black powder in the olden days....which means it will never be "bright" because of the pitting.

Despite all that, the rifle still shoots well enough to hunt with and did before I put all the effort into trying to clean it. I'd bet that your Marlin is just fine. If you want to try and clean it up further, you could try a more aggressive solvent like wipe-out or an equivalent.
 

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You know I don't think that your small pits are going to pose too much of an issue for you. Like the guys have said, shoot it and see! You can firelap and smooth some of the bad ones out if you deem it necessary. I think all of us have come across a sweet deal for a song and took her home and low and behold the bore is dark as a cave. Sometimes even the very extreme sewer pipes actually shoot pretty good. It does not sound like yours in in that category, so before you think about a rebore, lapping, etc. shoot it and see!
 

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Shoot it first. If used as a brush gun as you plain it will probley be OK. I have a .35 the former owner left in a shead for 10 or so years. He lost it at home ???. After a good cleaning it shoots very well. Have taken several deer it it. It now lives behind the seet of the truck.
 

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Clean it, shoot it. I just got finished restoring a 1893 Spanish Mauser to shooting condition. The bore was dark, filthy, and showed pitting in the grooves. Took a week to get it clean, but yesterday I was shooting 1" 50-yard groups with it using Remington 140 gr. loads.
 

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I once had a .338-06 rebore job. The craftsman (?) let the bit chatter and as a result there was a strip about 4-4 1/2 inches where a land was completely missing. The guy test fired it (Probably to see if it shot.) The only load I ever used in it did about 1.25 inches @100yds. I noticed an unusual amount of copper and cleaned the barrel really good. Only then did I discover the shoddy work, Being a semi perfectionist, I dumped the rifle. Should have kept it.
#1 S-I-L has a 700 in .25-06 that he used to kill some really nice deer in Texas and Mexico. I was in a major gun cleaning mode one time when he stopped by and ask if i would add his to the pile. The brass brush lost traction about eight inches from the muzzle. Looking closely, I could see (and feel) a slight bulge. Told S-I-L about it and he replied that it was that way when he bought it (used) and that it shot really good groups.
I also have a Colt 1911A from 1948 that has a good bit of pitting in the bore from corrosive primers, I suppose. It is a tack driver. I have finally decided that if it isn't broke, don't fix it!!! Good luck with yours. Jack
 

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Other folks here have hit the bulls eye on the issue... you won't know what it'll do until you shoot it....
I have an ancient S&W .38 which was hacked from 6" to 4" , the sight reset, and barrel never crowned, with a bore that looks like and asphalted sewer pipe, but it's a tack driver with all .38 spl loads, even my hard cast lead.
I also have a Marlin '93 with a rusty and pitted bore, but strong lands and grooves... guess what?
It shoots pretty well with heat treated gas checked cast bullets!! Go figure...
 
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