Marlin Firearms Forum banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,446 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A new article just posted April 2, 2021 on OUTDOOR LIFE.COM talks about the acquisition of Marlin by Ruger from Remington . . Sounds really good to me and I love all my Ruger handguns and rifles . . Can't wait to see what Ruger/Marlin comes out with first . . . .

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
I blame the rise of the MBAs (master of business administration) for the demise of many a fine company, all over the world. For them, the bottom line is the only line, and while they may understand spreadsheets, they know nothing about what it takes to make a quality product.
Skilled workers are anathema to them, "They want real wages, and respect for their hard earned knowlege." Replace 'em with kids pushing buttons on a machine they don't understand.
Great story about the broaches, a legacy job passed down through the generations. To build quality
you need motivated artisans who take pride in their work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Spot on Rrussa.

Back in the early 90s, I had dinner with the CEO of the Kimber Rifle Company at a mutual friend's house. Kimber was still in Oregon at the time. When I asked various firearms related questions, he looked like a deer staring into the headlights of a speeding car. His firearms knowledge was absolutely zilch. He was conversant in monetary facts and figures though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,857 Posts
Cautiously optimistic !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
I blame the rise of the MBAs (master of business administration) for the demise of many a fine company, all over the world. For them, the bottom line is the only line, and while they may understand spreadsheets, they know nothing about what it takes to make a quality product.
Skilled workers are anathema to them, "They want real wages, and respect for their hard earned knowlege." Replace 'em with kids pushing buttons on a machine they don't understand.
Great story about the broaches, a legacy job passed down through the generations. To build quality
you need motivated artisans who take pride in their work.
While I understand the sentiment and for the most part agree, I will say that not ALL MBA's are like this. Some do understand the value of craftsmanship and quality for quality's sake. The part that needs addressing and constant monitoring is when the MBA's start to have more of a voice in the boardroom than those who produce the actual product. For example, the executive management of company that makes widgets should always be a guy who's made widgets or designed the original widget. Not the bean counter that only calculates the marginal value of an additional production unit. MBA's are valuable as long as management keeps them focused on their areas of expertise and does not allow the foxes in the hen house so to speak.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pjbishop67

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
Chef,
I can appreciate your nuance on the issue. With balance of approach, number crunchers have their uses. Too often in this day and age, I feel they become the driving influence, short term profits over long term sustainability.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,297 Posts
I blame the rise of the MBAs (master of business administration) for the demise of many a fine company, all over the world. For them, the bottom line is the only line, and while they may understand spreadsheets, they know nothing about what it takes to make a quality product.
Skilled workers are anathema to them, "They want real wages, and respect for their hard earned knowlege." Replace 'em with kids pushing buttons on a machine they don't understand.
Great story about the broaches, a legacy job passed down through the generations. To build quality
you need motivated artisans who take pride in their work.
This true for all industry. What started it was business consultants such as "Gartner group" advising corporate managers that you essentially treat your employee skills like any other "Commodity" subject to supply and demand. You go out and find the skills at the lowest price not even considering experience\loyalty in the equation (That is why the old timers in a company can run circles around young folks that only have paper certs). Also, Gartner was the group who coined the concept that you don't have to know the "Nuts and Bolts" of doing a job in order to manage the people doing the jobs. Or, that a good salesman does not need to know about what he is selling (he just needs to be good at selling). That is why we have people in management that do not know squat about the business ----just the bean counting and MBA concepts and theory they were taught in college. This has been what we call the down fall of corporate America.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
And yet, somehow, the stock market is far far above its level of twenty years ago, and a record number of investors are making plenty of money to build a better life for themselves....this is somehow a “downfall”?



.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
RB,
After being in the market for well over 20yrs, here are the three things that are essential to understanding it; 1.The stock market is not the economy. 2. The stock market is not the economy.
3. The stock market is not the economy.
It is increasingly the provence of the .1%ers. Income inequality has been steadily increasing as fewer and fewer control more and more capital. Read Thomas Picketty and "Capital in the Twenty First Century". Main street is NOT Wall street.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,857 Posts
What destroyed Remington, Marlin, H$&R/NEF and many other companies is the venture capitalists like Mitt Romney’s old company Bane Capital. They buy companies and drain them dry with no intentions of long term success. Although, fiction, remember the movie with Michael Douglas as Gordon Gecko....greed is good.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,086 Posts
Greed is not good.
Numbers crunching only is totally practical in a few things:
recipes
analysis
budgets
and weight and balance of aircraft.

Number crunchers should not make the recipe for a quality product. They should only supply the facts so the experts can budget, manage products and set prices that bring further profits to said company.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
620 Posts
RB,
After being in the market for well over 20yrs, here are the three things that are essential to understanding it; 1.The stock market is not the economy. 2. The stock market is not the economy.
3. The stock market is not the economy.
It is increasingly the provence of the .1%ers. Income inequality has been steadily increasing as fewer and fewer control more and more capital. Read Thomas Picketty and "Capital in the Twenty First Century". Main street is NOT Wall street.
Can't like this enough. The rise in the stock market is called inflation. Inflation is to much money chasing to few goods. In the last forty years the number of publically traded stocks has dropped from around 8000 to somewhere over 4000. The number of Americans invested in the stock market has risen from 15-20% to around 55%(edit: down from the 2008 high of 62%.). It is no longer an equity market supportted by actual hard capital assets it is a demand market propped up by cash flow. And no one cares how they generate that cash flow. Which includes mining equity to make the quarterlies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Can't like this enough. The rise in the stock market is called inflation. Inflation is to much money chasing to few goods. In the last forty years the number of publically traded stocks has dropped from around 8000 to somewhere over 4000. The number of Americans invested in the stock market has risen from 15-20% to around 50%. It is no longer an equity market supportted by actual hard capital assets it is a demand market propped up by cash flow. And no one cares how they generate that cash flow. Which includes mining equity to make the quarterlies.
And a [email protected] ton of that money is all the stock based so called retirement funds that they suck all the money out of about every 10 years.

I told people back when stock bases retirement accounts began that people would be better off putting their money in some kind of retirement savings account.

Twice 401K’s in the last 15 years have been ruined and people’s retirements gone so to speak.
These 401k’s and similar accounts account for a huge amount of stock market money.

I personally haven’t and won’t invest in any retirement that is stock based or connected in any way. Corporate type long term retirement benefits are almost non existent these days and are less reliable than a 401k.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,086 Posts
And a [email protected] ton of that money is all the stock based so called retirement funds that they suck all the money out of about every 10 years.

I told people back when stock bases retirement accounts began that people would be better off putting their money in some kind of retirement savings account.

Twice 401K’s in the last 15 years have been ruined and people’s retirements gone so to speak.
These 401k’s and similar accounts account for a huge amount of stock market money.

I personally haven’t and won’t invest in any retirement that is stock based or connected in any way. Corporate type long term retirement benefits are almost non existent these days and are less reliable than a 401k.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I have invested in Fire ARMS, gold and silver and property. I have two free checks every month and two more to come. They are not tied to the stock market.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,327 Posts
And yet, somehow, the stock market is far far above its level of twenty years ago, and a record number of investors are making plenty of money to build a better life for themselves....this is somehow a “downfall”?



.
RB,
After being in the market for well over 20yrs, here are the three things that are essential to understanding it; 1.The stock market is not the economy. 2. The stock market is not the economy.
3. The stock market is not the economy.
It is increasingly the provence of the .1%ers. Income inequality has been steadily increasing as fewer and fewer control more and more capital. Read Thomas Picketty and "Capital in the Twenty First Century". Main street is NOT Wall street.
Can't like this enough. The rise in the stock market is called inflation. Inflation is to much money chasing to few goods. In the last forty years the number of publically traded stocks has dropped from around 8000 to somewhere over 4000. The number of Americans invested in the stock market has risen from 15-20% to around 55%(edit: down from the 2008 high of 62%.). It is no longer an equity market supportted by actual hard capital assets it is a demand market propped up by cash flow. And no one cares how they generate that cash flow. Which includes mining equity to make the quarterlies.
Excellent explanation of why a major bull stock market is a sign of economic free fall. I day trade and swing trade for a living and have made an absolute killing off of this market and the feds antics, while we experience great depression levels, HISTORIC levels of unemployment. Those who know how to take advantage of it get richer, and the rest stuck in a dying asset known as the dollar get poorer. Bears gotta eat too and I'll be waiting and ready to short the market when that day does come.

To the topic at hand, I'm ready to see what Ruger produces and what the quality level is like. Ruger has had it's own fair share of QC issues over the last few years, but nothing as bad as Remington. This can only be a good thing.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top