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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back in 1968, my Dad shot a young mulie buck that was standing on a little grassy knoll (no grassy knoll jokes please, my family respected JFK). Foothills of the Bighorn Mts. in north central Wyoming. Dad was hunting with Grandad's old 95 Winchester in 30-40.

The buck bounded forward a couple jumps or so and collapsed. As we dressed the buck we heard movement in the tall grass where the buck had been standing. "Go see to it, boy", Dad said to me. I walked over to find a crippled doe with a broken back laying on her side and most definately in a dazed yet panicy state. A chunk of her spine about the size of an apple core was missing and bleeding steadily. The heavy 30-40 bullet went through both the buck and the doe! Dad shot her through the head with his revolver. Then we dressed her too. We loaded the buck in our old Studebaker pick up but left the doe where she fell.

Back at the ranch, Dad told me he had to call the Warden, as we had no remaining doe tags. I could tell Dad was worried about a big fine.

The Warden came out to our place and we all rode together in his new state-owned Ford pick up to the site. The Warden looked at our footprints in the snow and saw that the story Dad told him was true. He told us that the doe belonged to the state but no fine would be levied as no crime had been committed. An accident that is reported promptly is not the same as a planned crime. Dad was relieved and the whole affair was forgotten. Except by me. I witnessed my big strong Dad turn himself over to the mercy of the Warden because it was the right thing to do.
Jack
 
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The memory of your your father is one to treasure, and a fine example for a young man to grow up and reflect upon.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dad died January 20th, 2004 at age 81. His friends called him George but he was always Dad to me. Dad loved Jesus and was very generous of his time and money to our church. I'm certain he is with our Lord right now.

I still miss Dad. Sometimes I put on his favorite red and black plaid wool hunting coat and it helps me feel better. Last week I shot his revolver and I felt like he was there too, sort of. Hard to describe and most of you probably think I'm crazy but I'm not.

If your Dad is still living, I hope you spend time with him. The day is coming when he will be gone and then that relationship will cease.
Jack
 
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Jack O'Conner said:
I still miss Dad. Sometimes I put on his favorite red and black plaid wool hunting coat and it helps me feel better. Last week I shot his revolver and I felt like he was there too, sort of. Hard to describe and most of you probably think I'm crazy but I'm not.

...The day is coming when he will be gone and then that relationship will cease.
Jack

Apparently not, Jack.

Just because you're wearin' his coat doesn't mean his arm ain't 'round your shoulder.

:wink:
 

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Jack, my father died five years ago and I still catch myself thinking "Gosh, dad would sure like to hear about that". He was not so much my mentor because we both got into hunting and shooting at the same time, but he was a great companion and we shared the learning experiences. There was an understandable element of competition between us and I think it added to our enjoyment of hunting and fishing.

Good hunting companions are priceless, and more than that, irreplaceable. As I age and my friends pass from the scene, I have become even more aware of this fact. Outdoor activities are among those rare times when we can bond with our parents and best friends in a way that is becoming rarer in this modern society.

Dad's choice of hunting and fishing gear were of such quality that his grandson's were thrilled to receive them. When I look at them and hold them its like he's still with us. I'm very grateful that I miss him as much as I do.
 

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Jack, my Dad is 84. Last week I cleaned all his guns for him and he seemed to appreciated that.

The first gun I shot was his Winchester 1890, made 5 years before he was born, that he gave to me last year.

We are planning another camping trip to the NC mountains this fall.

Your memory of your father is a nice one.

Writing this makes my head hurt. Take care.
 

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Jack O'Conner said:
I still miss Dad. Sometimes I put on his favorite red and black plaid wool hunting coat and it helps me feel better. Last week I shot his revolver and I felt like he was there too, sort of. Hard to describe and most of you probably think I'm crazy but I'm not.
My father passed away nearly six years ago, and not a day goes by that I don't think of him. He wasn't a hunter, and in fact didn't really support me taking it up, but we had enough mutual respect that it wasn't a point of friction.

While I wish I still had him around, I'm thankful for the time he and I had together, and I appreciate all that he taught me (good and bad).

Fathers don't get much (if any) credit these days, and the world is a sadder place because of it.
 

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It sounds like there are a lot of good dads out there. I've enjoyed reading about them in this thread. Makes me think the best way to honor them is to be good fathers ourselves.

The influence and importance of a good father figure on a boy can't be overstated. The prevelance of single mothers these days (6 of 8 in my own family!) scares me.

My mother didn't pick a good biological father, but luckily my "pappy" (step father) was a good, fair and kind man." He introduced me to the outdoors. He taught me the basics and then let me go out and figure out the rest. He helped me to fix it when it broke or didn't go well and was there with praise when it did go well.

There is no one that had more infulence on me than my pappy. I was truely blessed to have him in my life. I miss him greatly. It's been 15 years and his absense still saddens me.

In the context of this forum I would have LOVED to have had my pappy looking over my shoulder when I re-started reloading for my 336. His reassurance would have made pulling the trigger on that first handload a lot less scarey.
 

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My Dad didn't hunt, but did teach me firearm safty and marksmanship. I had my own personal DI for 20 yrs. (Dad was a Marine) He died 20 yrs ago this past June 10th. My Father-in-law kind of filled the void till this passed June 26th. Both loved nature and Jesus and I miss them both VERY much :cry: :cry: Both were WWII vets.

I agree that the best thing I can do to honor there memory is to be a good father. My daughter knows gun safty and is married to a Marine. If I'm blessed to have grandchilderen I'll do the best I can to teach them what I've been taught by my Father and Father-in-law.
 
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