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My BIL picked up an old 1940 Fox Sterlingworth side by side that is in near unfired condition on the inside but extremely pitted on the outside. The wood is near perfect, the bores are perfect, and the locking mechanism is as tight as the day it was made but the outside looks like a rough road. Supposedly it was placed in a closet shortly after it was purchased and stayed there for many years. It looks to me like some sort of acid or something was sprayed on it, maybe someone spraying for bugs or something.

Anyway, I was wondering if anyone had a recommended repair? He knows the collector value (whatever is left) will be lost but he is looking at making it a good shooter/hunting gun. I thought about a filler and powder-coat but on such a fine old gun this may not look to good. Please see the pictures below.

Festus
 

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Great find...Huge project.
You're right about the absent collector value , even as is.
However, if performed well, the filler + powder coat or durocoat could return a very attracticve and usefull gun, with an intersting story to boot.
Fortunately, current product offerings provide a wide range of colors and surface fnished to suite any individual's taste.
I believe I'd keep to light field loads though...
Keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
pls1911 said:
Great find...Huge project.
You're right about the absent collector value , even as is.
However, if performed well, the filler + powder coat or durocoat could return a very attracticve and usefull gun, with an intersting story to boot.
Fortunately, current product offerings provide a wide range of colors and surface fnished to suite any individual's taste.
I believe I'd keep to light field loads though...
Keep us posted.
It is a shame to see such a nice old gun look so bad on the outside! I agree with the light field loads, its a very small light weight frame 16 ga. so heavy loads would be rough anyway. For dove, quail or clays it will work out great!

Festus
 

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I work closely with corrosion issues on pipelines, and what you have there are 2 small very pitted pipelines. While there is no pressure on the pipes, you don't have a problem, but when the pipes are under pressure then the pitting presnts a serious problem.

The way that pitting is so closely linked, it can cause a sever structural weakening to the point that you could have a rupture. That is something you really want to avoid. So I would recommend taking the gun to someone who can assess the extent and severity of the corrosion and how much the steel has been weakened. In our lab, we actually view pitting under a microscope to determine the % wall loss, and the subsequent loss of integrity.

Knowing what I now of corrosion, I would not fire that gun until I had made the determination that it was safe to do so.
 

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El Kabong
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If you a product called POR-15, it will replace the lost metal, and convert the rust to an inert metal.
You will have to paint it afterwards.
Even with All-Metal, a body filler, you will still have to paint it
 

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I still don't like the looks of all the linked pitting that is on those barrels. Something highly corrosive got to that gun. You may be right, some kind of a chemical fog or spray. This is not your typical atmospheric corrosion condensation rust. This was quite aggressive.
 

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I'm a retired tool and die maker. First have the gun assessed for safe use as is. I would reload and only shoot light loads in it. If that is a damascus bbld gun forget it, you have to rebbl.

Next there is a process called metal spraying, sort of a light welding that replaces the metal that is pitted. You have to remove all the corrosion easiest way is to sand blast.

I have had crank shafts from obsolete motorcycles metal sprayed and machined back to original specs and they held up.

Bottom line, if determined it's bbls are unsafe, I believe you have a 12ga there, consider having it sleeved to 16 or 20ga that would make it usable and safe.
 

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Swany, that must be the same process I was thinking of only I've heard it called "splatter weld"

Festus, give this guy a look. I've been told by numerous guys who had real high end guns worked on that he's real good. Look at the examples on his site too. He does some amazing work.

http://www.gunsmithingonly.com/

Click on the "New photo gallery" and you'll see a lot of examples.

Here's one that is far worse than your shotgun and he fixed it up real well.

https://picasaweb.google.com/japeto...OHECKANDBROUGHTBACKTOLIFE#5457532264969289442
 

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What about JB weld, liquid auminum, etc? These will patch an engine block and are machinabla afterwards. Fill and sand and then coat with a bluing-like paint or powder coat. Will be as strong as any filler you can find.
 

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I would hang it on the wall next to the fire place. I have a shot gun and looks very cool, even though I don't shoot it. I didn't pay dime for it but looks like I invested in a couple of thousand dollars. ;D
 

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Halwg said:
I work closely with corrosion issues on pipelines, and what you have there are 2 small very pitted pipelines. While there is no pressure on the pipes, you don't have a problem, but when the pipes are under pressure then the pitting presnts a serious problem.

The way that pitting is so closely linked, it can cause a sever structural weakening to the point that you could have a rupture. That is something you really want to avoid. So I would recommend taking the gun to someone who can assess the extent and severity of the corrosion and how much the steel has been weakened. In our lab, we actually view pitting under a microscope to determine the % wall loss, and the subsequent loss of integrity.

Knowing what I now of corrosion, I would not fire that gun until I had made the determination that it was safe to do so.
Take Hal's advice, find out if it's safe to shoot first. If it is NOT safe and you cover it up with filler, someone down the road of time will shoot it. Keep that in mind as you proceed.
 

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great thread
 
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