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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
need some loads for 7/30 waters with the 120 or 115gr bullet's.anyone help me out here.powder' prim' etc.thanks.
ken s :?: :D
 

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I'm afraid unless someone else is watching this, I am not familiar with anyone that owns one! :( :? Marlins were just never well represented here.
 

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Speer # 13
120 grn Sptzsp, Speer, OAL 2.550, C250pr,
w748 33.0-37.0
RL15 32.0-36.0
H335 30.0-34.0
AA2230 26.0-30.0

C200pr,
RL12 33.0-37.0
AA2015 28.0-32.0
I3031 29.0-33.0
I4895 28.0-32.0
H4895 31.0-35.0
VVn135 30.0-34.0

Alliant 2003
120grn SprPt Hornady, Pr F210, OAL 2.640 (max only)
RL7 27.3
RL15 36.3

Accurate #2 Rifle
120 grn fnbt Nosler, OAL 2.530, pr: R9.5
AA2015 29.7-33.0
AA2495 33.3-37.0
AA2700 35.6 39.5
AA2230 30.6-34.0
AA2520 33.3-37.0
AA2460 30.6-34.0
AA4064 34.2-38.0

Hodgen 2002
120grn fp Nosler, OAL 2.500, Pr: f210, Max only
H4831 41.0
BLC2 37.0
H4350 41.0
H335 34.0
H414 42.0
H4895 34.0
H380 41.0
H322 32.0
 

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Wouldn't buying a reloading manual, be an advisable thing to do?

Bill
 

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Stillwater said:
Wouldn't buying a reloading manual, be an advisable thing to do?

Bill
Not knowing what I was doing, a friend advised me to get a "Load Book" for one particular caliber......it has the data from most bullet manufactuers and powder companies.......and yes, Bill....it's a damn good idea.
 

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Hey Stillwater, of course it would but when you get something that is new to you don't you want to get out there and try it as soon as you can. My preference on a lot of these is to get the one caliber book so you get the variety of options. But, if you are inclined I would highly recomment the RCBS load CD, it has several manuals and other cartridge programs for under a hundred dollars. No way you could buy all the manuals for anywhere close to the cost of the disk, let alone the other programs.

(edited to note Tubby beat me to it on the one load).
 

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Sure-Shot said:
Hey Stillwater, of course it would but when you get something that is new to you don't you want to get out there and try it as soon as you can. My preference on a lot of these is to get the one caliber book so you get the variety of options. But, if you are inclined I would highly recomment the RCBS load CD, it has several manuals and other cartridge programs for under a hundred dollars. No way you could buy all the manuals for anywhere close to the cost of the disk, let alone the other programs.

(edited to note Tubby beat me to it on the one load).
The same place you get "something new" from, usually has all the reference works you need to put your "something new" to use.

I never give loading information out. I will tell everybody, whom asks, where to find it. I knew of a guy who gave reloading information to a person, only to have that person try to sue him, after the loading information was missused, or missinterpreted. He had to get a lawyer to defend himself.

I just bought a new CZ 452 in 22 WMRF. I bought it because of the wonderful, uniquely figured wood, in the stock. When I bought it, I bought ammo, Rings and five magazines, at the same time.

If the CZ would have been chambered for a reloadable cartridge, I was standing right next to a rack of reloading manuals. And, this rack included the One Caliber manuals.

I have the RCBS disk, and I am also a member of ammoguide!

http://ammoguide.com/cgi-bin/newmyag.cgi?fr=ai

I have reloading manuals I have collected since the early fifties. Every shooter should have information like that.

When I worked a second job in a gunshop, one source of irritation was the guy who came in, with pencil and paper in hand, wanting to copy down some loads from a manual. He said he didn't need the whole manual, because he was only loading for one caliber. What a cheap sh!t.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ken s said:
need some loads for 7/30 waters with the 120 or 115gr bullet's.anyone help me out here.powder' prim' etc.thanks.
ken s :?: :D




just thought someone might give me idea's on best powder' bullets . by someone who has reloaded this cal in a lever. but i guess not. should have knew better than to come here for input. didn't mean to upset the apple cart guy's. an ido have reloading manual's . an i dont sneak around gun shops pen&paper in hand.
ken s :roll: :(
 

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Ken S don't let anyone get you down this forum is open to anyone at any level of experience, actually I am jelous as I have been planning on building one of these for quite awhile and have not done it yet. Stillwater is right as far as getting a manuel being a good idea, I had to check what I posted three times just to make sure I didn't make a mistake in my typing. Accordingly if you get the manual you know you recieved the correct info. Not everyone gives good info, but that was awhile ago on the old Marlin talk site. Lets face it in this day and age it is best to be safe.

Hope you stick around and post what you find works best in your rifle.
 

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Ken, like SS said, there are mostly good heads and helpful people on this forum, so don't be put off by any unkind sounding comments. There is much to learn here.

I have done work with the Waters and it is a very fine deer cartridge, better, I believe, than either the .30-30 or .35 Remington. After trying a number of powders, a friend and I liked the performance of XMR and IMR 4064 in our 7-30 Waters rifles and Contender handguns. Specifically, 38.0 grains of XMR 4064 was accurate, gave very good velocities in a 20 inch barrelled Model 94 Winchester (2700+ fps), and filled the case to produce low extreme spreads and standard deviations.

Kills deer like lightning, and really blows up the lungs when it strikes the chest cavity.
 

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tubbythetuba said:
Stillwater said:
Wouldn't buying a reloading manual, be an advisable thing to do?

Bill
Not knowing what I was doing, a friend advised me to get a "Load Book" for one particular caliber......it has the data from most bullet manufactuers and powder companies.......and yes, Bill....it's a damn good idea.
Tubby. Take the data from those load books with a few grains of salt. I have seven of these for cartridges I load quite frequently. I got them in the hopes that they would save me a bit of time rather than dig though all my loading manuals. Well, looking through them, much of the data comes from older manuals and AFAIK, they have never been updated. To me, this means that data for powders like IMR- 4895 used Du Pont's version and not IMR's version of the powder. Even some of the Alliant data has been reduced from what Hercules said was safe.
As a matter of fact, even though Lyman has recently come out with a new (#48) loading manual, much of the data is also well outdated. I compared a Lyman #45 manual, again using Du Pont 4895, and the #48 manual has the same exact data.
I realize it is expensive to have to reshoot that data, but while this is just my personal opinion, in the interest of safety, it should have been done.
It is my very carefully considered opinion that every load in the new Lyman manual that still has data marked as being tested by the copper units of pressure (CUP) method should be considered suspect.
Let's face it. There are some who will start out right at the max load thinking the editors of the manuals have a fudge factor.
IIRC, the lyman #48 says 46.0 gr. of IMR-4895 is the starting load and 51.5 gr. is the maximum for the 30-06. For many years, before I decided a heavy bullet was a better choice in my 30-06, I loaded the 150 gr. Sierra Pro-hunter (They didn't call it that way back then) over 49.0 gr. of IMR-4895 by Du Pont. A few years back, I finally got a chronograph, so decided to see what that load had really put out. I bought a fresh can of IMR's verion of 4895 and loaded a box of ammo. I even used the same rifle that I worked up the original load in. You cam imagine my surprise when I had a blown primer, and this from a load in the middle of the charge range. Well, I figured I either set my powder measure up wrong or it got out of adjustment. When I broke the loads down, the powder charges were right on the money. The load was 2.5 full grains lower than the maximum. A little research and I found out that in order to cut costs, IMR went to sawdust to make the nitrocellulose used in making gunpowder. This was cheaper than using the standard cotton linters that Du Pont used. The end result seems to be that current IMR-4895 is noticably faster burning that the Du Pont version.
Brass was, for the record, World War Two LC43, new and unfired, primer the CCI 200, that is all components were the same except for the new can of powder and box of primers. The rifle was the same FN Mauser used back in the late 1950s and early 1960s. That load should have given no trouble at all, yet, it certainly did.
FWIW, I went back and started with the starting load and worked back up to 47.0 gr, only ONE GRAIN above the starter.
To me this says watch out, That powder is faster burning that what some of the books say. Could be the rest of them are as well.
Paul B.
 

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PaulB:
You have made a very good point on considering reloading data. That is why I collect reloading manuals!

I don't buy powder by the pound, I buy it in the cannister. That way I will have a known quantity, of ONE lot of powder. If you buy powder by the pound, the lot number will always be different! And, in my opinion, you need to rework up all of the loads all over again.

When I receive a new cannister, of any size, if the lot number is different, I rework up the loads again.

It just pays to be safe. Hell, I'm retired, so it's not as if I don't have time to do it ...

Bill
 

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Stillwater said:
PaulB:
I don't buy powder by the pound, I buy it in the cannister. That way I will have a known quantity, of ONE lot of powder. If you buy powder by the pound, the lot number will always be different! And, in my opinion, you need to rework up all of the loads all over again.

Bill
I only shoot about an hour a week at the range (50-60 rounds), so buying powder in bulk would last me a long time. So, what is the “rule of thumb” for how long to keep powder (at avg. room temp) ? And also, the handloaded ammo ?
 

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howie38 said:
Stillwater said:
PaulB:
I don't buy powder by the pound, I buy it in the cannister. That way I will have a known quantity, of ONE lot of powder. If you buy powder by the pound, the lot number will always be different! And, in my opinion, you need to rework up all of the loads all over again.

Bill
I only shoot about an hour a week at the range (50-60 rounds), so buying powder in bulk would last me a long time. So, what is the “rule of thumb” for how long to keep powder (at avg. room temp) ? And also, the handloaded ammo ?
I keep my powder, properly sealed and in a relatively cool, dry, place.

If you ask any of the powder companies how long the powder can be stored, you won't get a direct answer from any of the powder manufacturers.
 
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