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Another how not for the faint at heart.

If you are not confident in doing this take it to a smith, or order a happy trigger, as it can make your firearm unsafe if done incorrectly.


This is normally done at a smiths and with precision fixtures and a precision grinder.

This mod can be done with hand tools and if you are adept without machinery. I REPEAT DON'T DO THIS IF YOU ARE NOT CONFIDENT

Items needed a medium grit stone, trigger pull gage. Establish your triggers pull wgt before starting. If under 5lbs you probably shouldn't be here. If under 4lbs or less, stop right there, you are blessed.

Your trigger has an angle on the sear and a corresponding angle on the hammer. These when mated together have a negative angle. The more angle, the heavier the trigger pull. Lessen that angle and your trigger is easier to pull in lbs or ozs.

You can reduce the hammer but is very difficult to do so. So don't.

The trigger is the way to reduce it easily. Remove the trigger, "Easy wasn't it?" Clean and inspect for burrs, flaws. Remove any burrs. Remove and inspect the hammer as this is important to your overall job. If you find any burrs of flaws in the hammer reinstall the hammer and recheck your wgt of trigger pull.



Paint the sear suface with a magic marker. The negative angle points up and rearward from the curve of the trigger. (Get this right) It is the sharp end. Place the trigger on the stone at eye level upside down, with your thumb pushing downward and fwd, trigger curve away from you push the length of the stone. Inspect to see where you took off the marker. If you took off the mark on the sharp edge you are doing it right. If so do this three times total. (That surface and angle is small and reduces fast. Most often I go from 8lbs to 3.5 - 4lbs with three strokes so you can see it goes fast. I do have a 30-30 that went from 8lbs to 1.5 with 4 strokes! Reassemble and check your work.

If you have went to far do not despair, you can get the happy trigger or reverse this process with that same stone.

ONCE MORE I REPEAT DON'T DO THIS IF YOU ARE NOT CONFIDENT

I am updating this to add something that can reduce your triggers pull and is easy to do that is to lighten the amount the trigger spring exerts on your trigger causing some of the wgt of pull. Fairly easy to lighten and here is a pic of a 336 I done, it now has a 24oz trigger. Basic triggers in leverguns are pretty much the same between all Marlin levers from the 39 to the 1895s.
 

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Thanks Swany,

This is great info. I noticed this weekend during our Cowboy match that I was flinching just a bit on some shots. Tuesday I took out the .45 that I "Cowboy" with and the .32 that I punch paper and squirrel hunt with to try some new loads. I noticed then that the .45's trigger was heavier than the .32's.

After carefully reading your instructions a couple times, I tried it. My .45 was about 6.5# and is now 4.5#. The .32 was about 5# and is now 3#. While I was at it I checked my other .45 and it was already 4.5# so I left it alone.

You're right it doesn't take much. I was trying to get the .32 to about 4#. I only ran it across the stone twice and then smoothed it on a piece of 2x2 mosaic tile(my profession, plenty on hand).

Thanks again,
C.S.
 

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Does make you a happy camper when you do it yourself. Do remember that the trigger return spring averages about a 1lb reduction when bent to relieve the pressure. ;D
 

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Some take more, some get lucky or right whichever fits. ;D
 

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Do remember to adjust the trigger return spring first and recheck it's pull wgt. Sometimes that's enough for a hunting rifle. Nice groups, and good shooting.
 

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This is a 39A trigger but the sears are the same, hope the picture helps. Excuse the rough drawings from paint.
 

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swany said:
Do remember to adjust the trigger return spring first and recheck it's pull wgt. Sometimes that's enough for a hunting rifle. Nice groups, and good shooting.
Swany,
Could you show a picture of adjusting the trigger return spring? Thanks
Dave
 

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Here you go pretty straight forward, sorry about being a few days.
 

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Thank you Swany! I have done the spring mod on all of my guns, but was always a little leary about stoning the sear. I've been shooting the Guide gun quite a bit this last week and it always has a long gritty triger pull which I have lived with. Everytime I shoot it I think to myself how much my group could be improved with a better trigger. What the heck I pulled the trigger out tonight cleaned it up and gave the sear a few swipes over the fine stone under a good light so I could see what i'm doing. I put it back together and dry fired it a few times and what a difference! ;D It's now as good as the trigger on my cowboy. The only thing I wonder is...what took me so long to give it a try? ??? Thanks all is well now and i'm headin up the range in the morning.
 

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Here you go pretty straight forward, sorry about being a few days.
Late post, sorry.

Oh, OK - thanks Swany. Didn't know that was the trigger return spring, I've seen it by another name as well.

I saw on another site, may or may not help others:

Take the trigger plate in your hand and look down into it from the top side. You will see the trigger block safety spring. This spring also bears on the rear of the trigger. Using a small screwdriver under the short leg, the one bearing on top of the trigger safety block, pry up on the spring approximately 1/8". You want to bend this leg upward enough to relieve tension on the trigger safety block. Don't try to get all the bend in one try, but bend it up a little, try the trigger block safety for tension by pushing it up from the bottom behind the trigger. Continue bending and trying until you can easily move the safety block up with your finger. Leave enough tension so that the safety block always returns to it's down position.

Now look at the long leg of the spring where it bears on the rear of the trigger. Pry it up a little at a time to relieve some tension on the trigger. Be careful and don't kink the spring. You are only trying to relieve some of the tension. It is better to error on the safe side rather than having to buy a new spring.
Thanks for this thread again, Swany. A fantastic resource.
 

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Used your instructions to stone sear. pull is about 2 1/2. Passes all the bump and push tests, however there is a slight glitch or catch in the trigger pull before it smoothes out. I think the sharp edge is rounded enough to avoid catching in the back of the hammer notch. Any ideas?
 

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Followed the instructions. My stone must be a bit finer. Bent the trigger return spring, 4 passes accross the stone, now have a crisp 2.75# trigger. Thanks for the tutorial Swany.
 

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Trigger Spring Hump

Fiddling with the trigger spring on my 39m, I discovered something amazing. (If this has already been said somewhere, my apologies!!)

Before I start, let me say this:

Gun repair should be done by qualified gunsmiths. Don't fool around with this type of thing if you are not one. Guns can be dangerous things. If not done correctly, you can end up with a gun that is even more dangerous! I am neither recommending the following procedure, nor suggesting you try to duplicate it. I am simply relating what worked in my case.

My trigger felt like a two-stage trigger--but in reverse. The first several thousandths of pull was relatively light, and then all of a sudden got heavier, breaking at 5lbs. Without removing it, and using a small screwdriver, I pried the end of the trigger spring up (where it contacts the trigger) and then grabbed it about half-way back with a pair of needle-nose pliers. Then I bent it upward a little bit in an effort to relieve some pressure on the trigger. That made it worse!

In the process of trying to bend it back to its original shape, I bent it a little too far, resulting in it having a slight hump in it. In other words, the end of the spring that contacts the trigger was now bent slightly downward. Surprise! It completely smoothed out the trigger pull, and it now breaks at just over 3 lbs!

I've included some drawings that I hope will make it clearer. Note: The bend in the trigger spring in those drawings is exaggerated. The hump needs to be just high enough to clear the heel of the trigger when the trigger is in its rearward position. Originally, the heel on my trigger rose up and hit the spring, changing the fulcrum point, which in turn increased pull weight. To keep the pull weight even throughout, the spring should not come in contact with the heel of the trigger when the trigger is pulled. Instead, the only the very end of the spring should make any contact.

IMG_2555.JPG
 

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Looks like another way to do it. Thanks.
 

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and here is a pic of a 336 I done
Ummm! How do I get to see pics?
I haven't dared to take the rifle apart because in 2 days it starts deer season and my luck I'll lose a spring or something. I can wait BUT what would be nice is if there was a way to take pictures of what you are trying to explain like how to hold it before you put it on the stone.
One more thing...
This is my first Marlin 336CS 30-30.
When the safety is pushed from left to right the hammer goes forward but it does NOT have the firing pin hit the primer.
When the safety is pushed from right to left the hammer goes forward and the firing pin hits the primer.
Question is this normal? I am use to rifles having the trigger lock in the safety on mode.
 

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Swany,

I followed your instructions and the only result was that my trigger is loose and jiggles when the hammer is cocked. what happened? there only seems to be one way the trigger parts go together but my trigger was not loose and floppy before i disassembled my gun.
 

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Thanks Swany for the instructions. Took a NIB 2012-made Remington 1894C and reduced the trigger pull weight from 9 lbs 6 oz to 4 lbs 14 oz that is crisp as it can be. Installed Wolff spring kit, adjusted trigger return spring as you suggested, and installed a Skinner Black Gold Express sight. Thrilled with the rifle and can't wait to shoot it...even if it is Remington-made. Thanks!
 

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Thanks Mr. Swany. I am still finding it hard to believe that my trigger on my Remington 336 went from a crisp 6.5lbs to 3.25 lbs. by bending the return spring and 3 swipes on a fine stone to the seer. I am glad I purchased a magnifying visor. being able to clearly see helped keep the seer at the correct angle.
 
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