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I'm lookin to get a chronograph. Did the search thing on here and came up with some older post. Looked at Midway and read a bunch of reviews from different brands. Looking for some newer info from you guys. What are you using, pros and cons.
 

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I've got the CED Millenium. It goes for about $200 now, and is a good unit. Setup is easy. Easy to use.

A buddy of mine also has one. He got the optional IR sensors which he really likes, they're another $90 or so. I haven't felt any pressing need to buy the IR sensors myself.









Guy
 

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I have the Chrony F1 Master and have been satisfied. The remote readout is a real plus at my regular range where there can be long periods between cease fire calls.
 

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The secrets to long chronograph life:

Always use a rest.
Always set the unit up with a target / aiming point behind it.
When setting up the target remember that scopes are a couple inches above the bore.
 

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imashooter2 are you confessing or just stating the facts. ;D ;D ;D
P S I got a used crony $35 works good if it don't get wet or muzzle blast.
 

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Just stating facts. I haven't shot mine yet. But I'm religious about the rules.

Here's a quick little Excel sheet I threw together to do the basic computations. In put strings from 2 to 20 shots, output high, low, average, extreme spread, standard deviation, kinetic energy and power factor.

http://home.comcast.net/~bigdb/crnycalc.xls
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
imashooter2,
Thanks for posting your sheet. I'll give it a try.
\ The target behind the Chrony doesn't always work. Was at a USPSA match, we had to check power factors. The RM took my G-30 lined it up and blew the defuser off the top. Needless to say he blamed the trigger not himself.
 

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I found an F1 in my local classified for $25. Is this a good deal?
 

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Here are some pics he sent me.


Looks to be in good shape. Said he only used it about 3-5 times
 

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If you want a shooting chrony, wait and get a Beta Master at the minimum.
You always want a chronograph with remote controls. The brains are in the remote so if you hit the downrange sensors they are cheaper to replace than the whole box. Also the window will get hard to read because it can get hit by bullet lube, and unburned powder.
The F1 only displays one shot- you are going to do a lot of writing and math and walking.
The Alpha only displays one string, each time you change loads you will have to write everything down and zero it before the next load. It does calculate avg, es and sd of the string.
The Beta Master Chrony is the best compromise. You can get it for around $100. It will store 60 shots. I set mine for 10 strings each having 6 shots. It will give you the average for the string and more important the ES and SD. The Extreme Spread, ES, is the difference in velocity between the highest and lowest velocities in the string. It is the best indicator of a good performing load. Standard Deviation,SD, is best left to math wizzes. But the lower the figure the better the load. You can control everything without getting up from the bench. Any you can save the data and take it home to look at later.
$25 for an F1 isn't too bad, you can always trade it in for a better chrono later.
Also, the Shooting Chronys are an acceptable low priced chronograph, If you have the money you can get better.
Lastly, you can test it by shooting a bb gun across it.
M.
 

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I had a shooting chrony F1, and after I shot it I got a Prochrono digital. The F1 was fine, but I like the Prochrono better - the controls are more intuitive and I don't seem to get as many errors with it. The prochrono remembers the strings after its turned off (like the Beta model shooting chrony) and you can connect it to the computer and download the information directly from the unit (or if you're brave you can take a laptop to the range and control the chronograph from the laptop). Both have a remote control available (I made my own for the F1 out of a couple of momentary switches and a stereo headphone cable), the prochrono model is way more expensive but has a lot more controls.

Shooting Chrony F1
Pros:
  • Folds up smaller
  • Made of metal
  • Upgradable
  • Cheaper (??)
  • Cheaper remote control (you can make your own)
Cons:
  • User interface not as intuitive
  • Forgets strings after poweroff
  • A little more complicated because of folding
  • Remote control is pretty primitive

Prochrono Digital
Pros:
  • More intuitive controls
  • Easier setup
  • Fewer sensor errors (at least in my experience)
  • Remembers strings after poweroff
  • Can connect to computer and upload data
  • Remote control is excellent
Cons:
  • Made of plastic
  • More expensive (??)
  • Remote control more expensive

As you move up the levels in the shooting chrony line you get more and better features, but you also pay more. I like the prochrono better but that's just my preference, they both work fine and will do what you need them to. Neither react to being shot very well... ;)
 

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What is this making your controller deal?
 

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I'd take a picture if I could but I packed the remains of the F1 up in a box (I'm getting ready to move) and I don't know where it its right now.

Remote control uses a standard 1/8" tip and ring stereo headphone jack, so all you have to do is get a couple of pushbutton momentary SPST switches and a headphone extension cord from Radio Shack, and something to mount them in (I used a pill bottle). Its easier to mount the switches in the lid of the pill bottle before you start, and run the headphone cord up through the bottom of the bottle. Cut the female end of the headphone cord off and strip the sheath back a couple of inches. You'll have 3 wires, generally 2 are insulated and one is bare - the bare wire is the ground and the insulated wires are signal wires. Strip a little insulation back from each of the signal wires. Solder each signal wire to one side of each switch and then connect the other side of each switch to the ground wire (this can be tricky, I made a little "Y" out of wire to accomplish it). Once everything is wired up correctly, you've got yourself a Shooting Chrony remote!

Check out this site for a schematic.
 

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Whichever chronograph you get (I have an Alpha Master Chrony myself,) you will need to make sure you use it properly in order to get good, consistent results. The principle of operation is very simple, the chrono measures the elapsed time from when it detects the bullet at the first sensor to when it detects it at the second sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor is where people have problems with chronos. I find that my Chrony works best on cloudy days without the diffusers. I use the diffusers when it's a bright sunny day. But that's a small issue.

The elapsed time between first and second sensor is VERY short. On a Chrony, the sensors are 2 feet apart, IIRC. So for a bullet going 3000FPS, the elapsed time over the sensors is in the order of 1/1,500 of a second .0015 seconds. The Chrony assumes that the distance covered by the bullet is the shortest distance possible between the sensors, which is 24 inches. If you do not open the Chrony completely flat, the distance between the sensors will be shorter so your velocities will be higher. If you set your Chrony at an angle, in other words not perfect level, the distance traveled over the sensors will be longer and your velocity will be slower. If you do not shoot your bullet perfectly level through the sensors and at the same distance from the middle line your velocity will be slower. Also, you need to set the front sensors at exactly the same distance from the muzzle every time, if you want to have repeatable measurements. On my Alpha chrony, I used a marker to indicate 12 feet from the device. I use a camera tripod with a bubble level to make sure it's set properly and I shoot level to the ground through the middle, about 4 inches above the sensors. Every time. Whatever you do, you need to repeat every time to get consisten readings. Have fun.
 

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Tip: Mark the cable that connects the control box to the sensors and use it like a tape measure to set the distance from the gun to the sensor.
M.
 
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