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I have been shooting a lot of cast bullets from my 336 in 30-30 and am wondering what to look for when checking for leading in the barrel. I have read a number of posts here and search for images on the web... from the pics on the web, some leading is easy to see (granules and shavings) while the leading at the base of a groove would require a bore-scope or eyes better than mine to detect...

I clean the bore after each time at the range, currently using Hoppes #9, brass brush and wet and dry patches... I stop with the patches when there is the barest trace of gray on the patch, then dry patch and lube... I have yet to get a patch come out as white as it went in, but then again I found the same when cleaning after copper...

I have a plume of lubricant at the muzzle after shooting (read somewhere here that is a good sign), so I reckon the bullet lube is doing its job... I am not seeing any loss of accuracy during my shooting sessions... I am shooting cast sized .001 to .002 over bore...

so I said all that to ask this:

is a bright shiny bore a good sign that I am getting all the lead out?

does leading in the groves leave dull spots in the bore that are easy to see while cleaning?

is there something I'm missing?

thank you for any insight on this topic...
 

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.

Lead in the barrel is very often hard to see until there is large amounts deposited in the grooves. If the bore is bright and shiney the lead will look like satin streaks and spots. A tight patch on a cleaning rod will show where the lead is.....to the experienced hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thans JB... I was thinking along the same lines, but wanted to get advice from those more experienced...

a follow up question... if I'm not experiencing accuracy issues, is a small amount of leading a concern? just wondering if I need to change my cleaning regimen and use a cleaner specific to removing lead...
 

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Thans JB... I was thinking along the same lines, but wanted to get advice from those more experienced...

a follow up question... if I'm not experiencing accuracy issues, is a small amount of leading a concern? just wounding if I need to change my cleaning regimen and use a cleaner specific to removing lead...
It just gives subsequent boolits a place to rip off more lead - in other words it contributes to the problem.
You can see the lead up against the riffling and as a "wash" in between.
Some folks shoot jacketed after in the theory that it will clean out the worst. Dunno how much fact there is to that tho...
 

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is a bright shiny bore a good sign that I am getting all the lead out?
Probably. Leading "problems" are pretty easy to see.

If you want a real check, try some Remington 40X on a tight patch. If there's lead, it will be clearly visible as shiny sparkles. The gray stuff is bullet lube, and that comes out real slow, and may be a bit of a problem with accuracy and jacketed bullets. But lube has never damaged a barrel that I have heard.
 

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Patches

Hey David,

I use pre soaked patches (with ATF) on a tight fitting jag.

When I get home from the range, using a slight scrubbing motion (2" forward, 1" back) run a "wet" patch down the barrel.

Allow to "soak" over night. Next day, run a dry patch down. Then another wet patch. Leave bore "wet", until next range trip. Then run a dry patch.

If you have any leading at all, you will see "silver" slivers on your patches.

Here is how I keep my patches. (the "pink" ones are wet) The pudding containers are great. Have patches in .22, .30, .38 and .44/.45 caliber.

Really like the Pro Shot patches/cleaning rods/accessories.

With a pointy bullet rifle, use the same procedure, and on occasion check it for copper fouling with Sweet's 7.62 Solvent.

Have been using ATF for a long time, as a cleaning agent. Works better/easier than any other solvent, I have tried. (and a quart lasts a looooong time):biggrin:

Shoot a lot of cast bullets in revolvers (which can be a real pain to get clean). The "wet" them down and let them soak overnight method, seems to be the "easiest". Also, the ATF seems to "coat" the bore, putting a stop to leading.

Later, Mark
 

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A bore snake is a good way to remove leading. I had a Kahr Thompson M1A1 a while back and shot my own lead 45 ACPs through it. It leaded up initially and a 45 cal. bore snake cleaned it out nicely, literally pulling chunks out. I wrapped bronze wool around the wire embedded in the snake to remove smaller chunks.

After two or three uses the Thompson did not "lead" up using the same rounds; probably due to sharp edges being somewhat dulled?

I had a moment of weakness when someone offered me a significant bonus to sell it to him.

DD
 

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Mark, I will have to try the ATF method... I have had no leading in the 45-70 but as I add more and more calibers I cast for Im sure I will get some in one or more....




Doc
 

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Mark, I will have to try the ATF method... I have had no leading in the 45-70 but as I add more and more calibers I cast for Im sure I will get some in one or more....

Hey Doc,

Works great on powder residue, as well as "preserving" the bluing. Only solvent I use, except for Sweet's 7.62.

A new barrel is usually the "best" culprit for leading. A couple of swipes with JB Bore Paste, and a good "soak" (about a week) before firing will minimize fouling (lead or copper)

The Krieger Match barrel I had wound on my M-1, quit copper fouling in ten shots! (think I let it "soak" for two weeks, prior to firing)

The only culprit in the "stable" right now, is the 8-3/8", K 38. Just gives a "trace" of leading, in one "groove". ?? Have other fish frying, so will take care of it as time allows.

Also, have found ATF to be the ideal 1911 lubricant. When I shot Bulls Eye (for twenty years), would only clean my Gold Cup twice a year. Once at the end of the Winter League, and once at the end of the Summer League. (where I lived then, could practice on one of three indoor ranges, most every other day) Shot thousands of rounds every year, just in Bulls Eye practice. One drop ATF on the disconnector/feed ramp/each slide rail, and barrel/bushing, at every session. Never a "hic cup".

Use it on bolts/levers/pumps/autos/revolvers/single shots. LOL Flat out works. (main thing, is to allow to soak overnight, and "stubborn" cases a bit longer) LOL As in old mil/surp's.

Later, Mark
 
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