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Been starting to research the 1894's for the magnum pistol calibers and I have usually gone with the pre-Remington, pre-safety variants, but doing my research have found numerous anecdotes that the recent 1894's fit and finish is getting decent, and the accuracy (at least in the 44 mags) has been very good, possibly better than the older rifles.

Anyone have any additional experience?

I think I would get a 44mag first, since I don't have that caliber yet, but somehow have the dies for it...
 

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I have an Oct 2018 1894 in 357Mag and it runs like a well oiled clock, fit and finish is fine and it shoots well with a RPP cloverleaf peep sight...

This is at 50 yards...

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I have four new Marlins, all made after 2018. Two were made just recently.

I have a 1895CB, 1894C, 1894CB in 45 Colt and my newest is an 1894C Dark.

All are smooth and accurate. As accurate as my JM Marlins.

The 1894C carries a Leupold 1-4Xscope and shoots 2 MOA consistently with factory ammo and my reloads of jacketed and cast. With more experimentation and better shooting techniques I'm sure that I could shrink those groups.

My 1894C Dark carries a Bushnell TR-25 red dot. The rifle comes with XS sights and an XS scope rail standard. But my son had an extra red dot and I put it on there. 100 yards hits on an 8" steel swinger are easy.

My 1895 45-70 shoots great but i admit that is is on the back burner for now.

My 1894CB in 45 Colt is very accurate and I am just now starting load work ups. I cast 200 gr, 255 gr and 300 gr bullets for it. I am putting together a bunch of test ammo to try to find the best loads for it.

All are very good rifles and I will be keeping them. I still shoot my JM's.

If you buy a new Marlin just look it over like you would any gun before you buy it.

Best of luck,

Steve in N CA
 

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One of the issues that puzzles me is why the Model 1894 pistol cartridge rifles appear to have more than acceptable fit and finish than rifle caliber models. I was in a LGS a couple years ago and there was a Model 1894 in the rack whose fit and finish was as good as any of my JM Marlins. I don't recall if it was a 357 or 44. I was not in the market for yet another caliber or I would have bought it.

Other Remington made Marlins that I have seen have not been acceptable. It got to the point that I stopped checking the Fit and Finish on Marlins any time I go into a LGS. I gave up. If I were to buy another lever gun, it would be a Henry. EVERY Henry I have ever looked over were well made rifles, excellent fit and finish, and cycled smoothly.

Case Closed. :cool:


Mike T.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
One of the issues that puzzles me is why the Model 1894 pistol cartridge rifles appear to have more than acceptable fit and finish than rifle caliber models. I was in a LGS a couple years ago and there was a Model 1894 in the rack whose fit and finish was as good as any of my JM Marlins. I don't recall if it was a 357 or 44. I was not in the market for yet another caliber or I would have bought it.

Other Remington made Marlins that I have seen have not been acceptable. It got to the point that I stopped checking the Fit and Finish on Marlins any time I go into a LGS. I gave up. If I were to buy another lever gun, it would be a Henry. EVERY Henry I have ever looked over were well made rifles, excellent fit and finish, and cycled smoothly.

Case Closed. :cool:


Mike T.
That is generally why I have stuck with the JM's. The crossbolt safety is just a preference. I like a lot of Henry's offerings and since Marlin's are no less expensive these days I may consider buying one of their 45-70x models to replace the 1970's Marlin I foolishly sold years back.

But for the Pistol caliber cartridges, the Marlin 1894 is almost 1lb lighter and svelt. That means something to me, as does the ballard rifling of the newer marlins compared to old though that is not as important if I got a good deal.

I also am a fan of small Red Dots on lever guns, as sacrilegious as it looks. Especially since no one makes a really lightweight fixed 2x or 4x scope in a decent price range which I think would be perfect for lever guns.
Leupold's VX Freedom (or was it rifleman?) 1.5-4x is sub 10oz, but still $250.
 

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I have a 2018 1894c 357 that has been great. My brother just picked up a new one one gun broker, it has really nice wood and it's a shooter.
 

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I bought an 1894 Dark in .357 last Friday. It’s a VERY well made gun; fit & finish are excellent. I took it home, took it apart, cleaned and inspected everything, then reassembled it and took it to the range yesterday with a bunch of different loads in .38 and .357 to see what it liked. It ate everything; had one...ONE slight snag on a .38 round I’m almost certain was inadequate crimp on my part. Over 300 rounds, and it was flawless. Tighter groups than I expected with a 16in. Barrel too. Almost dead on one inch at 50 yds with several of the different rounds, both .38 and .357 surprisingly. I’m looking forward to doing a bit of polishing on the internals to slick things a bit more, but I’m VERY impressed with it so far
 

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FWIW.. a few years ago I regrettably (as always) sold my 1982 JM 1894c .357, so.. back in February I found and bought a brand new mfg. date 8/2018 1894c in .357. I don't have any targets from the old one, and the one's I do of the new are out in my110+f (PhxAz) garage maybe this fall I'll dig them out.. with the Remlin I hit clays from 75 to 120yds 158JSP/16.5H110 4x glass-very pleased. I can say on the JM the metal finish was shinier, the wood had a more glossy finish, outside of that, I believe the new one is more accurate, feeds more reliable- 38/357 no issuers, JM hated 38's, and to me looks a little nicer with the darker grain and checkering, hooded sight..fit and so on is excellent, old one fore stock wiggled, the gun had a rattle/jingle to the trigger which I found annoying.. so, in the end, value aside, I find the newer rifle overall a bit better IMO..no regrets..
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50 metres and 100 metres 10 rounds each. Couple of flyers on the 100m. .44 cast 265gr @ 1150fps. Make sure you inspect the barrel with a light before you leave the store. It's a bit tricky because you have to do what we're taught not to do and customers will see you do it. You need to shine a light at the bolt face and look carefully straight down the muzzle. It'll save you some heart ache to see deep sharp rifling, no defects like shadows or scores, and even rifling from muzzle to breech. Also check the crown. My rifle does have a barrel defect but it still shoots fine. Mine is 2018. The wood to metal fit is exceptional with nice wood.

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Just purchased new an August 2019 1894c in .357 mag that I am very pleased with. Traveled about 1.5 hrs to purchase from a Northern PA shop. (buying experience here was my best ever). The fit, wood and bluing are all very well done. Removed bolt and lever to clean before and after shooting. It cycles well both BlazerBrass 125gr FMJ in 38 special and 158gr SWC .357mag private manufacture. About a 3 inch group that were all left of target at 50 yards standing freehand. I considered that good for me. My 58 year old eyes had a tough time with the semi buckhorn sights. Will probably put a peep on it as I read many good things about those on the forum. Trigger seems lighter than my 1 year old 336W and vintage 1893 both in 30-30. Look forward to shooting again soon!
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