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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
How much effect does rebarreling have on value and grading % ?
I should say if the barrel has been replaced with a slightly newer one on a 120+ year old rifle.
 

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Well, that is a good question. My grandfathers 1894 Winchester built in 1898 was originally a 30WCF but it was he favorite rifle and he shot the barrel out. When he handed it down to my father they sent it out to be bored to 32 Special, crop the 26 inch barrel to 21 3/4 inches and taper the barrel so my father could use it as his saddle rifle. It is a sweetheart of a rifle but I asked my gunsmith about returning it to it's original Sporter designation as what they did to the original barrel killed the value.

I did a search awhile ago and if I recall correctly (don't quote me on this) if the rifle had the original barrel it would have been worth in the neighborhood of $10,000 for it's condition. After the barrel rework it's now worth around $1000.

He suggested to search for an original 30 WCF Sporter barrel and have it shipped directly to him for inspection on condition with a three day inspection period. If the barrel is good to go and the patina finish matched closely it would greatly increase the value. Probably in the neighborhood of $8000 if I recall correctly.

Purchasing a new barrel and refinishing the entire rifle would make it worth less than in it's current configuration.

Hope this helps.

Jack
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Jack for your info, I do know that Winnie's bring higher $$ to the tables than Marlins, just curious what effect barrel change has on value/ grading.
 

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Switching barrels is an arguable thing. Of course if a guy is buying, a switch is negative, to the seller, he tries to make it a positive. Lots or rare caliber guns are made up to increase the value, a decent rare chamber is screwed into a cleaner receiver for example.

The serious collectors dont like, the novice collectors dont care as much.

Lots of old guns have had their barrels switched before they became "collectable"

It becomes an ethics problem to some extent, and how the gun is presented to the buyer. If presented as "original" then that is horse manure. If presented as a "re barreled with original parts" thats an ethical presentation.
 

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How much effect does rebarreling have on value and grading % ?
I should say if the barrel has been replaced with a slightly newer one on a 120+ year old rifle.
if you are looking for a nest egg for your grand kids --- leave it be. if you intend to shoot it and have fun, re-barrel ... value is only in the eyes that own it.. The grand kids will like either way..
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks RGR for your input, what you say is very true. I would consider myself a novice with a serious attitude toward originality, it a genetic charateristic passed down through my father.
But what brought me to this question was a seller with an obvious barrel switch, which would be ok if I was looking for just a shooter.
To have them say it was completely all original insulted my intelligence, receiver was poor shape with barrel having decent blue, sharp octagon edges with shiny bore and asking a price in the 80-90% range.
My adult son happened to be with me that day and this discussion ensued.
So it got me wanting to know how it does or could effect value of not just this particular rifle, but any.
Of course it's the old addage, it's worth as much as one willing to pay.
Unfortunately people try to take advantage and with the current gun craze makes for unscrupulous sellers.
 

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If you replace it with the same period barrel, same caliber and length then who would know? Even if your gun is in the records there is no way to tell. Now change calibers or barrel length ...that's different!
 

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If you replace it with the same period barrel, same caliber and length then who would know? Even if your gun is in the records there is no way to tell. Now change calibers or barrel length ...that's different!
The guy that changed the barrel would know. No doubt thousands of guns have been sold with replaced factory barrels, some sold by knowing sellers, some sold by second owners that were not aware. If a guy wants to cover his bases on ethics, and he isnt lying, he can say, "the gun is as is, I wont swear as too anything. Its just a gun I picked up in a swap."

Such a statement would be ethical if the statement was indeed true. If the seller had the barrel replaced with same caliber, the gun is STILL NOT ORIGINAL and should not be presented as such. (If he had the work done, and was asked, and knew the facts)

But lets say a guy takes a 336 or maybe it was the 36, and replaced the 30 30 barrel with a chance find of a 219 Zipper. That would increase the value of the gun to some degree. Selling it as "original" is an out right lie if the buyer is not told.

Older Winchester guns are on occasion, found with two proof marks on the barrel. That means the barrel was either replaced by the factory, or by an authorized Winchester repair station, or I suppose some worker at the repair station copped the barrel from the parts room, and another smith installed it.

In any case, IME at least, that does not harm their value to any great degree. I suppose it might on a very rare gun, lets say a Win 70 in 7 by 57 mauser.

Another "trick" on the Win M12 was installing fancier wood on a field grade gun. Again, IMO it depends on how the gun is presented.:)

If any disagree on my notions, just let me know, before we do any gun trading.:biggrin: Am just kidding, seriously though, opinions on the topic do differ.

Generally, a replaced barrel will often show installation marks, or the wear patterns wont match the rest of the gun, or the color will be funky looking, or something to spill the beans.,
 
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