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Hmmm... I've read many of the articles that Mr. D'Alessandro has posted on Real Guns. Although it is pretty clear that he really likes certain brands, particularly Remington and Ruger, it also seems pretty obvious that he has more experience with, and knowledge of, firearms than most of us will ever have.

Many of his reviews include part 2's, in which he develops handloads that work well with the firearm he is reviewing. It's pretty clear from the data he includes in those reviews that he is no dummy.

Mr. D'Alessandro does not claim in his review that all Remington Marlins are better than the old Marlins were. Rather, he simply compares a new, Remington made, 336C to his own 1956 model 336, and points out some features of the current model that have been improved since his 1956 model was made.

Does he compare his new 336C to a North Haven Marlin from 2008? No. He also doesn't really say much of anything about workmanship, or fit and finish. His conclusions, are both objective (he says the new rifle is more accurate), and also subjective (the new one feels better and looks nicer).

To try to characterize that as saying Remington Marlins are better than the "real" Marlins is to be intellectually dishonest.

One last point. Mr. D'Alessandro is reviewing a new 336 here in September of 2014. Presumably, the review gun is of recent manufacture. There are no obvious defects visible in his photos of the rifle, nor does he report any problems with it. His article is NOT about the sale of Marlin to Freedom Group, nor is it about the problems Remington had with building lever guns when they moved production to Ilion. He is simply reviewing a rifle today. He has no duty to discuss past events if he chooses not to.
 

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Everyone has an opinion.And we all know what opinions are like.I bought a And shot a Remlin 336C and I see them in Walmart and Bass pro regularly. I have done my own review.I think the workmanship on Remlins is junk ,therefore I will never own one.Even if they do shoot ok.Just their appearance is an insult to the Marlin name.
 

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Money for a good review without mentioning the other products that suck until recently.
Still hit and miss on quality. But the could have made sure that he got a good rifle.
I am pretty sure rifles are not like cars and other things that are reviewed.
They send them the rifle for the review vs cars and other products are bought incognito off the shelf or lot for review.
JMO though.
 

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I just don't like how the checkering looks around the edges, a dark black look as if it were paint:hmmmm:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It certainly doesn't upset me. I guess that they deleted my comment and banned me from their site was what I thought was chicken ****. I've seen some decent remlins...... Also seen really bad ones. I didn't say anything other than that. Those facts were too tough for real guns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I do like some of the wood they put on then although the checkering looks weird. I have yet to cycle one that felt right, maybe there are just tons of bad remlins on shelves out here and the "new ones" haven't made it out here yet. I'm also well aware they probably hand picked and GAVE him a rifle to write about. Why would he bite the hand that feeds him? :)
 

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I suppose I'd be upset, too, if I posted my opinion in the comments section of a blog and had it deleted. After all, why even invite comments if you don't want to know what people are saying about what you've written?

Still, I need to stand by my earlier comments. The author has decades worth of accumulated knowledge and experience with firearms. He is reviewing one particular Marlin 336 that he has in front of him, and is actually using. He is NOT reviewing Remington. He is NOT reviewing the decisions made by, and actions taken by, Freedom Group following their purchase of Marlin. He has no duty to do that. He is doing a rifle review, not an analysis of whether you should be buying stock in Freedom Group.

The author provides evidence in the format of photos of the reviewed rifle, as well as data from shooting it. When comparing and contrasting the new rifle with his older Marlin, he makes clear distinctions between objective observations and subjective conclusions.

Read the author's other posts. Clearly he has no agenda, other than to provide accurate and knowledgeable information on many different types and brands of firearms.
 

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It is a nice reading article and has a few good points. Much of what is said is the writers opinion and there is nothing wrong with that. What no one should lose sight of is that this article is as much of a advertisement as it is a magazine article. Read the last couple of lines at the bottom of the article and that is the sales "close".
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes they're selling guns, I get that. That's what I thought was slightly dishonest about it all. It's why I thought it worth mentioning in the comments that not all the remlins are something that "an old Marlin can't hold a candle too in terms of quality and craftsmanship". It's things I would say if I had a storage locker full that I really needed to clear out. At the end of the day I sincerely hope they can consistently make working rifles again.
 

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Yes they're selling guns, I get that. That's what I thought was slightly dishonest about it all. It's why I thought it worth mentioning in the comments that not all the remlins are something that "an old Marlin can't hold a candle too in terms of quality and craftsmanship". It's things I would say if I had a storage locker full that I really needed to clear out. At the end of the day I sincerely hope they can consistently make working rifles again.
I'm confused. Exactly what about the article is "dishonest." Read the author's blog. He has reviews and ammo tests going back several years involving a myriad of different models of firearms from pretty much every firearms manufacturer out there. Why would he decide now to pick out a new Marlin rifle and do a dishonest review of it? The Real Guns blog seems to have a pretty good reputation for providing trustworthy information on firearms. Are you saying all his reviews are nothing more than ads for all of the firearms brands he writes about?

Also, look at their website. Yes, they take ads. Yes, they also have products for sale.* They have a store, and you can order firearms from them on their online store. Does the fact that they're selling something automatically make all of their reviews suspect? Of course not. It's not very good business to consistently push products that you don't believe in. Your customers are not stupid. They will soon learn who they can believe and who they can't believe, and they will spend their dollars at the business that steers them to good products.

Lastly, although you can certainly speculate all you want, there is nothing whatsoever in the review that tells us anything about where the rifle reviewed came from. Is it a hand-picked T. and E. gun from Marlin? Or, is it simply a gun the author ordered from their distributor, and received through the normal sales channels at their store? We don't know. Additionally, is there something inherently wrong with "cherry picking" a gun that you are going to buy? That kind of thing, as a consumer, is an intelligent thing to do. It has been done buy discerning customers for years, and still takes place today. I know, because I recently did it when I picked out a firearm. If the store you are buying from has more than one of the gun you are looking at, what's wrong with asking them to get them all out, so you can pick the one with the nicest wood, the fewest fit and finish imperfections, and the best trigger? Moreover, what's wrong with going to more than one store to find the best example of a particular firearm available?

Again, I just recently bought a new rifle, and the store had more than one available. The example on display had gotten a scratch on the barrel, so I didn't want it. The salesman actually offered to bring out others, and let me get them out of the boxes to pick out a nice one. Nothing is wrong with that.

Again, though, we don't know here whether the author, or Marlin, chose a particularly nice 336 for the review, or if the author simply grabbed one off the shelf and reviewed it. So, why should we speculate?

*Unless I'm missing something, though, I can't seem to find a Marlin 336 for sale at their store.
 

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I don't know, but I just bought a new 336 manufactured this year and I am quite impressed. There were a couple of burrs on the carrier that needed attention, but the stock to receiver fitting was excellent and the wood was beautiful. I went through all the internal's and was pretty happy with what I saw, other then the heavy trigger. I am a machinist that works building Aegis radar systems and Ground radar system enclosures for the military, so I know my metal work. A little more attention to their deburring and the trigger, and I would not be able to fault the gun whatsoever :)
 

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Never seen a paid advertiser make a bad remark about the product he is extolling.


Remington is coming along on quality. Just wish they would redesign that 2X4 they attach to the front.

I bought some of the new wood for my 1970 and did not like the squared off front and rear. Literally ground it down on my bench grinder.
 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms!
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As a kid I seized upon every utterance of the most holy gun writers. The good things I bought at the behest of their preaching included my 1979 Marlin 1894C. The not-so-good purchases have long gone bye bye without a second thought. I learned from the teachings of my adopted 'Gun Daddy' very early that those writers are mostly minions of the gun industry. I trusted my Gun Daddy and subscribed to the 'Milled Steel and Walnut' club early on. I have been an engineer in the firearms manufacturing arena for many years now. I've matured and have done fairly well at recognizing and separating the chaff from the wheat when it comes to the new breed of hi tech guns. This stuff is learned through a long, at times expensive spending on 'Tuition in the School of Life'. It seems that most of us on this forum are learned as well. AC
 
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