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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 336C in 30-30 and a 39A, both from the early to mid seventies. Both have a few almost un-noticable nicks on the stocks and forearms. I'm very happy with the performance of both these arms, and satisfied with their appearance. As I've said the nicks in these rifles are barely visible. How would refinishing them affect their value? I'm personally on the side of leaving them alone but I'm curious as to their collector value.

I also have a '50s era Remmington Bolt .22. The barrel and tube mag. have developed a slightly brownnish tint over the years. Should I strip this and re-blue it, (making it look new) or just keep it closely maintained so this doesn't turn into pitting rust? The wood on this rifle has over time aquired a similar amber hue. Should I strip this and re-finish it, or leave it alone?

Thanks very much for any and all responses!!!
 

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First thing a collector looks for is original condition. Going plumb is natural, minor dings happen. (By the way if you put a damp cotton cloth over the ding many will come out with the application of heat from an iron or the like). Anytime you refinish you loose most of the value for a collector. The exception is one so bad that it has no real collectors value. In that case you are turning it into a shooter. Another exception to the rule is a museum quality refinish which will usually cost more than the rifle cost. Obviously if the stock breaks you need to replace it or do a very good repair job.
The 336C is a fairly new rifle with no collectors value at this time and if it makes you happy to refinish do so. The 39A is popular but again is not old enough to be a high value collector at this time, but hold onto it for 50 years or so and it may be a collectable.
I have no information on the Remmington so won't comment on it.
 

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Leave them alone! This is "character" and if the finishes are fine for you, leave them be. If they ever become someone elses property, then they can decide what they like, if you are handing them down to family, the original condition you used them in may be very valuble to decendents. Showing one's age shows one's character.

As far as the patina on the Remington - personally I would leave it, as well as the ageing characteristics of the wood. Just treat them all with good cleaner/moisturizer/wax, what ever (maybe not the moisturizer), and enjoy the character they all have.

Obviously, you can see the difference between all three. Each has their own particular markings, dings and such. Now, imagine if you will, they are forced to "wear the same clothing" (same perfect finish) - how do you think they would appreciate the lack of individuality? Each of them has gone along differnt paths in existence, let them show their individuality.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks men for re-affirming my inclination. I already knew that I loved each and every one of these arms just as they are. I was just inquiring with respect to collector value. You all have answered this question for me.

Thanks again!!
 

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With all DUE respect: I disagree about taking care of the wood. For the sake of argument: Before you had these firearms it's possible albiet remotely possible that the wood could have already been 'replaced'. Who's to say that at some time in the future a mishap and you've got a broken stock...big deal get new wood...the meat is in the metal!

Who's to say if you found another rifle like the one you have and saw that the wood on the new find was ten-times better...buy it and change out the wood. Clean up those dings make sure they are sealed and will not be a place where moisture can enter the wood.

If these are your rifles and you plan on keeping them and passing them on then by all means take care of the entire rifle.

Most purists are purists some within reason, some outside the box on being reasoned.

Those are your rifles and when you leave them to your kids they won't give a hoot about the looks of the stock all they'll remember is they were yours and you used them and enjoyed them, and just maybe they'll remember when they shot cans with you...

I've got my Grandfathers, then my Dads model 61(?) or 63(?), 22 pump. It's older than I am and I am nearly 60 and I keep the wood and Bluing impeccable...dings don't last a week before I take care of them...

I mean if you are concerned about collector value then put them away and don't use'm, that will re-solve your dilema...
 
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The look of an aged and used firearm shows its longevity and usefulness. It also shows the pleasure I or someone else has gotten from it.
I will second the fact that collectors like them this way....Original.
Lusting for your guns,
Brian :mrgreen:
 

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Just like a Jeep.. there not scratches and dings , there character lines :D

Everyone tells a story.. :p
 

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I'd lightly touch up any ding that resulted in bare wood/metal. I've been using an old t-shirt and usually WD40, G-96 or just Pledge on the outside metal and wood and that seems to keep the water beading up for a day. If you notice the wood taking on water, swelling up, take the wood off and seal the inside surfaces with several coats of your choice of sealer/finish. This is, of course, for users, not collectors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No, no, men, There's ZERO bare wood on any of my rifles!! Especially no bare metal!!! Geeeez!! I was just curious with respect to the collectability of the firearms. Basically, I was asking if they were worth more with a few signs of use, un-noticeable without close inspection, or would they be worth more looking brand new. I think they're worth more original. Right? They're all in fine to excellent condition(going by the NRA condition guide).

I keep a thin film of Hoppe's #9 oil on the outside(wood and metal), and Rem oil in the bore. I know, I know, initially I had second thoughts about using oil with teflon in the bore, but I read that Rem oil is approved by the military and went ahead and used it. The Rem oil seems to have closed my factory iron/bench rest group, at 100 yards, from 3-1/2" to 2-1/2" on the 336C. Most of the 2-1/2 is me so, I'm delighted with the 336C!! I haven't shot the 39A since cleaning it and using Rem oil.

I think Pledge on the wood is fine. I'm not ready for it on the metal yet though.

Also, I was given the 39A and the 336C, both new as Christmas presents from my dad. The Remington 512 was my dad's rifle. Dad bought it from my mom's uncle or cousin long before I was born.

I checked out the dates on these arms, and they are as follows:

Marlin 336C, 1976

Marlin 39A, 1974

Remington 512, Aug. 1947

My first rifle is my Ithaca 49 single shot. It has shot the primer out of 16 Ga. shells, without disturbing the rest of the brass, on several occasions. This feat has always been performed at 10 to 15 yards or so, certainly. The only thing I don't like about the Ithaca is the aluminum receiver finished with flat black powder-coat paint. It shot like a champ out of the box though, and has been the source of many a "squirrel rotisserie on a stick over an open campfire BBQ" throughout my childhood.

The Ithaca 49 was presented to me new, on Christmas of 1971

Highest thanks to everyone for sharing your priceless knowledge!!!!
 

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Defcon9 -
Allow me to offer a different opinion - seems the majority tends to run the other way than I........

I have three rifles I have refinished the wood on - Marlin 39A, 39M, and a custom 98 Mauser I inherited from my grandfather that he built 2 years before I was born.

Both Marlins were Christmas gifts from my father, and unfortunately, were left under my care before I paid much atention to proper gun care. I dinged the wood up here and there, so I decided several years back to refinish them and "start over".

My grandfather built rifles from approx 1956 till his death in 1982, and I was lucky enough to aquire three of them. The one I received as an inheritance was the groundhog gun he built for his personal use, and I spent most of my childhood summers at the old "farmhouse" he owned, following him around as he kept the place hog free. 22-250 with a Douglas bbl, who knows how many rounds it's eaten, and it still will put 5 shots inder a dime at 100 yds....

To me, the refinishing done on the stock doesn't detract from my momories associated with them - the two from my Dad will always be from him, and I didn't hesitate to do those. However, I had to give a lot of thought to redoing the stock on my grandfather's rifle. The conclusion I came to was this - I tried to learn as much from him as I could before he got sick, and after evreything settled down, I decided that my contribution to his work would be to restore it to it's original glory. The blue was near perfect, but the stock finish was very thin in places, had many light scratches and small dings, the recoil pad was dry-rotted, and one of the swivel studs had grown a little rust. After finishing the project, I had a near mint example of his work, and the lack of stock wear from his use didn't have any affect on my memories of the many groundhog safaries we went on. While I can appreciate the aged condition a weapon receives over it's history, I still prefer to see them in as close to original condtion as practical.

Shum8
 

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Whoops!! Double post. Where's the "Delete" button??

L.W.
 

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1976 336C?? If it has enough dings in the stock to bother you, I'd refinish it. In my opinion, there is a difference between "character," and "abuse."

In fact, speaking of "abuse," I am right now in the beginning process of refinishing a 1976 336C, gold trigger, round bolt, D&T, that I bought for a very decent price. The stock has some dings and real scratches, and the finish is cracked and splotchy. Other than one very slight rub mark on the barrel blue, the entire metal is pristine. I bought it from a guy who bought it from the original owner, who apparently rarely ever used it. How in the world the guy who owned it originally, managed to bugger up the stock the way he did, without bashing the blueing, is beyond me. Thankfully, the only "repair" needed is to refinish the stock and forend. And a tiny bit of cold blue on the "rub" on the barrel.

I can not determine that anyone ever turned a screw on this rifle as there is not one single mark on the screws whatsoever.

The bore appears to have been taken care of quite well, and looks to me to be 99%, as does the interior of the receiver, bolt, etc. I can't prove it, but I'd bet a lot of money this 336C hasn't been shot more than three or four boxes of ammo.

Because the walnut is better than normal in quality and grain, I believe this rifle is going to be very handsome when I get through with it. I'll add a Lyman 66LA receiver sight, and have a very nice shootin' "truck" gun.

In my opinion, the 336C made in 1976, unless you have something very special from the factory, is not a collector piece. Refinish it if you want and enjoy it.

FWIW.

L.W.
 

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Hello from Scotland~

This is my (1988) Marlin .444ss when i bought her (very cheap) she had a a badly fitted hard adjustable recoil pad :( and horrible redish varnish all over the butt :cry:

I stripped her right back sealed, filled pores,sanded,and oil finnshed after all i had nothing to loose :wink:
Marlin wood work is so good but the factory finish doesnt do it justice.....after all if they spent the time to finish them like this they would cost so a darn sight more :wink:



Englander
 

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Englander:

Nice piece and excellent stock refinish.

But; I really would have taken off the white grip spacer!

It really takes away from the rest of the "package".


Besides; what in the world do you use a .444 for in England?

Exterminating pesky old out of date phone books?
I thought that ya'll hunted "big game" with air rifles "over there"?

(greetings from a scot's heritage "southerner"!)
 
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