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I have been faced with this decision more than once. I have come to the conclusion, it is best to use the gun as manufactured. It seems the rechamber always has some problem. It seems that you can never reload to full strength without sticky brass or some other pressure problem. And when you finally think everything is OK, you find that the gun does not shoot as fast as you thought it would, or accuarcy is poor at the higher speeds and wind up shooting at pre-rechambering speeds. It has been an exercise in fustration.

Also, regardless of how fast a round nose or flat nose bullet starts, it loses speed much quicker than a pointed nose bullet. If you want more speed, get a 243, 270, 7mm-08, 308 or 358 BLR. Or get a 243 or 308 Winchester 88, or a Savage 99. All these rifles are lever action and shoot flatter (faster than a Marlin). In my opinion, it is better to accept the Marlin as a 150 to 200 yard gun and spend the extra money to reload and shoot more often.

While I am giving opinions, if you are rechambering to get more knock down, don't. Instead, step up to the next rifle. Instead of converting a 30-30 to 30-30AI or 307, purhase a 35 Marlin and reload with 35+P bullets, or get a 375 or a 444 Marlin. Again, just my opinion.
 

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Be real careful Taylor, you are making sense. Some things will never change and one of them is the mystique of the wildcat or rechambering to a bigger case.

While they were the only way to go in the last century for more fps or knockdown power. It is no longer the same. We now have a 45-70 with a belt and call it a .450 marlin. (Lawyer Proof Caliber only chambered for modern firearms) Won't stop most reloaders with a 45-70 but you take your own risks if you use hot loads in a weaker firearm.

While not suitable for every situation the 30-30 in a levergun has taken every thing that walks, crawls, flys or swims. Though the latter would make an honest person a criminal. Makes no difference it will do the job if you do yours.

Now to rechambering, I would go into bear country with a 45-70, a .375 or something of similar power. Now if I had a 30-30 and wanted to do the same, it would be risky but would feel more comfy if said firearm were rechambered for the .307 or .356. The firearms you mentioned are very good firearms and well worth the money for one. #1 thing they are not our favorite levergun, so we rechamber for more power.
 

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Taylor,
shake it off, you will be ok. Don't give up now. If you rechamber and it isnt so good you just re-rechamber right?

I guess we should learn from someone who has walked this way before us, but we never will. History is doomed to repeat it'self.
Pb
 

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Taylor
Who did your rechamber job? I had a 30-30 rechambered to the 307 win.I have heard some say they can't shoot above starting loads.But I have only had one case stick in the chamber.And it was a maximum load with IMR 3031. But I have shot maximum loads with other powders with no problems.But you are right a RN. or FP. bullet will loses speed much faster than a pointed bullet.And you are right I did not need a 307 but I wanted something different in a MARLINlever action.I already have a 444,45/70,375,356 and 35.So I didn't need the 307,but sometimes what we need and what we want are two different things. :roll:
 

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Although I tend to agree with you Taylor, I don't think every rechamber has problems, and many of the problems incurred start with the owner. Often times owners tend to push the load data, and after a rechamber they try to wring out every ounce of velocity they can. This often results in problems they wouldn't have, had they loaded their newly rechambered gun to average specs.
I can't see how rebarreling, is any different from rechambering, except that folks who rebarrel do it for different reasons, so they usually don't try to push the loads on their new barrel. They're usually trying for extreme accuracy, so they get that before they get near max loads.
 

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I don't understand the idea of rechambering, with the problems that may result, from reading others' posts. It would seem more sensible to step up to the next caliber, rather than pushing performance. There are alot of rifles to choose from for variety. Practicing alot to get good accuracy figures in to it. But then tinkering for some is as much the pleasure of being a gunowner, as shooting the gun. I just hope folks do their research and don't cut corners to save a little money.
 

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Often times we become Walter Mitty's and think that if the bullet had gone 200fps faster, or had a .100 higher ballistic coefficient we would't have missed that shot, or lost that (you fill in the blank ------) game animal.

Back when all I had was a bolt action .30/30 (Rem.788), all I could think of was moving up to a larger caliber and/or better rifle. Now after many years and killing my first deer with a .30/06 many years ago, I have now moved back down to where I started from.

I just the week-before-last killed my 4th and 5th deer of the year, the last a 180lb 10pt buck with my lowly Marlin .30/30. I did so because:
1. I knew I was going to have to carry the rifle and my folding chair into where I was going to hunt, and then bring it out with me. (State WMA regs)
2. I wanted more whop and penetration than my .223 was giving because I had a premonition I was going to want/need more of both. (I did!)
3. I like the handling and performance of the Marlin rifle (light and quick and adequately accurate)
4. My shots were all going to be less than 100yds. (as has 98% of all my shots in past 35years!). Of the last two, the first took a 90lb doe at 27 steps. The second, the aforementioned 180lb buck at ~80yds.
5. The day before, I missed a shot on a doe at 40yds with the .35Rem. (my fault, the deer was moving through hardwoods and I "killed" one tree and wounded another with the single shot fired from the .35)

And, BTW, my 150gr Corlokts did fine at just under 2,400fps (20"bbl- chrono'd). But, the 150gr Winchester factory Hollow Pts. I bought last year to try out did just about the same at a chrono'd 2,250fps.

What has changed is that I now have to be careful as to what I shoot as I frequently limit out on deer (now 12 a year, with 2 antlered bucks max) instead of wondering if I'll get a shot this year. So I KNOW what the various calibers/cartridges are capable of and don't desire to lose 10-25% of my deer/pigs to excessive wounding and damage. Though I did lose most of both shoulders on that buck! So much for the .30/30's reputation as a "wounder" of game!!!

I have found the .30/30 and .35Rem to be an ideal balance of power/effectiveness/weight/accuracy. Exactly what has made these combinations to now be entering their 3rd century of performance.

Consider that the Flintlock period lasted just over 200yrs, the percussion guns just over 100yrs. Then look at how short the life span of most of our nations various firearms/cartridge/weapons systems have lasted.

Back in 1968 who would have thought the M-16 would be still going strong and considered still the state of the art in battlefield rifes? Now going on 35years.
(Yeah, I know that numerous replacements have been conjured up, but none in current, or near future use)

So, back to the .30/30 Ack-Imp, .307, and .356, and throw in the 7-30 Waters, and the 7mm STE (Shooting Times Easterner- rimmed 7-08 ala the .307 and .308).

I would love to have one of either, particularily the 7mm STE or .356 in a Marlin, but, then Marlin is still doing business just making .30/30's, .45/70's, and the pistol caliber carbines.

But, we can always dream !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thats why we rechamber, (my first deer .30/06 now wears a .338/06 bbl, still weighs 10+lbs, and is still a gun-safe Queen!), rebarrel, and buy new guns.

Seems I'm saving up for a Rem mod7 in 7mm-08.

Why?
Because Marlin dosen't make a half magazine, lightweight carbine with a 20"bbl in 7mmSTE.

I don't really NEED more power/flatter trajectory. I just want a New/Different TOY! I could have used the .30/30 just as successfully on elk last year as I did my .338 (still lost the elk!), but had to tote a 10+lb rifle approx 12mi. a day for a week. My 7lb Marlin would have been much happier! And then, I might have stalked down the 250yd shot to 125yds, and KILLED an elk too!!!

We are always in pursuit of "Excalibur", the "magic" sword or gun!
(EVEN THOUGH WE KNOW SUCH DOSEN'T EXIST!)

Go Figure!!!!

Now, what do I carry tomorrow morning? (my hardest/biggest decision!)

I think I'm going to take that Winnie m94 in .45colt I won this past summer!!! (Iron sights, and a 315gr Cast bullet at 1,500fps!)

Why? I think it just feels "lucky" tonight!

If you think that a rechamber or rebarrel will make you feel "LUCKIER", go for it!
After all, its just a little money, and you can't take it with you after you leave this world!
 

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What do you do when you can not "step up"? Is it then ok to rechamber?
I wanted more power in a lever gun -- had a 45/70 already, was it then acceptable to rechamber to .50 alaskan?
My take on this is that everyone has an idea of what they want. As long as what they do is safe to others-- it's ok in my book.
 

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One thing to remember; more velocity, or a bigger projectile, doesn't bring the game home. What brings the game home is practice, and familiarity with your particular combo. If you have lots of range time, and know your bullet drop, and variables, you can take almost anything with a .30-30, or even lesser cartridge.
Will the .50 Alaskan do things better than the .45-70? Sure! But could you do the same thing with the .45-70, if you have complete confidence in your gun, and your abilities? Sure!
My personal opinion is that those who switch to the biggest, flattest, or baddest cartridge available, often practice much less, because they have so much confidence that this new wonder caliber can do it all by itself.
Our ancestor's took a lot of game with just a handful of pretty slow old cartridges, or even slower old round balls!
 

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Hey MM93,
What do you call the 'correct amount of practice'?
In my case I generally shoot 50 rounds of shotshells, 100 rounds of centerfire handgun and 100 rounds or centerfire rifle per WEEK, 45 weeks per year. I hope that means that I can hit what I am shooting at--and not having too much confidence in another cartridge at the expense of marksmanship. :oops: Honestly though, I miss sometimes also-- just like everyone else. I just wish I could find some of those old time Marlins you always yurn up with :D.
 
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