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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a lead on two used Lee 1000's and a Dillon of unknown model number. They're all used, but I assume are still in good working order. The 1000's are set up for 9mm on one and 38/357 on the other. What are they worth round abouts? I'd like to make an offer that the seller and I can both be happy with.


TIA
SqS
 

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They list for $200 with the dies but you can purchase them through Boses for $116 with one set of dies. It's funny, but I've seen used units sell on eBay for more than this new price but it is simply because guys are not doing their homework. Glad to see somebody checking.

Depending on how this fellow bought them, a fair price for you and a fair price for him might not meet. If the press and dies are clean, a fair price might be $70 to $80 each. Just my guess but for anymore I would just get a new one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I saw that Lee had them listed for $199, but everywhere else has them listed from $120-$149 give or take. I figured $75 each would be about right. I know he used to shoot competition so they probably got used a bit, but I don't know if he wore them slap out. I kinda doubt it.

Any suggestions about the Dillion? I don't know if it's a Square Deal B, 550, or 650.
 

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Squirrel, beware of Lee 1000s. The priming system is fundamentally unsafe and prone to blowing up. If you can get them so cheap that you can't resist, prime off the press and put upgrade kits on the powder measure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nice. Thanks for the warning. Guess I'll check out the Dillon and go from there. What's so bad about the Lee priming system? Should I just suck it up and buy a Dillon 650 for cranking out the rounds?
 

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The Lee 1000 primes in the upstroke of the handle and gives you no real feel for how the primer is seating. The feed to the priming piston is via an angled ramp which is not quite steep enough. Any slight problem can result in a primer only partially on the piston and not in line for the primer pocket. Coupled with the lack of feel you get cocked and crushed primers.

I'm not quite sure exactly what happens but at some point you either set off a primer or the priming compound from crushed primers detonates and the whole magazine chainfires. It's a helluva bang.

I put on safety glasses before I put on my pants so I was not seriously injured, but I had a dozen plastic splinters sticking out of odd places. Made me so disgusted that I converted the Pro 1000 to a basic turret press that I dearly love.

I've looked into getting another progressive, and the consensus is that the Dillon and the Hornady are only two worth considering. Dillon is the best established and I have never heard a bad word about one. The new Hornady is getting great word of mouth and is cheaper on caliber conversion.
 
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