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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all, i was wondering what I can do to take out the used primers before they go into the resizer, plus any good cleaning methods?....i have some dirty 45-70 brass that i need to clean up--as well as about 100 filthy .308 cases...the only method i have been using so far is clean the case from the outside, then resize. ....that "must" be hard on the dies!!...any special tools you can recommend, techniques would be apprec!!.. one technique i read the other day is put the "deprimed" cases in a pillow case, tie off the end and then throw it into the washing machine/ and then dry!?.......thanks larry ps..... i can't afford a tumbler right now-- someone is watch'n me!! :wink: :wink:
 

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All the makers have a universal decapping die. Step up and make your choice:

http://www.midwayusa.com/midwayusa/..._products&search_keywords=universal+decapping

I have also seen a Lee decapper that used a punch and receiver and was manually driven with a mallet (similar to the system used in their Classic Loaders). A quick web search didn't turn it up though.

The old "NRA formula" 50/50 white vinegar and water cleaner will work just fine. I sometimes use it on extra tarnished brass. Mix up a 50/50 mix of vinegar and hot water, add a small squirt of dish soap. Swirl the brass and let it soak for an hour. Rinse in clean water and spread out to dry. Save the formula for reuse in an old milk jug.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks guys, guess i'm off to the store!!....larry :)
 

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I know I am late here but a universal decapping set is the only way I do it

Cleaning --- there are as many ways as there are reloaders.

Decaping tool set is really inexpensive and well worth it.

As written above, I only put cleaned brass through my dies.

Bojon
 

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You might keep your eyes open for a rummage sale electric ice cream maker. I see them fairly regularly for $5-10. Never tried one for tumbling cases since I have a tumbler, but it's been in back of my mind. Rice works fine as tumbling media, preferably with a little Bon Ami or Dutch Cleanser added.

I've also heard the the commercial guys use concrete mixers, but that's overkill for most of us.

I've also decapped a good many cases with any punch handy, often a blunted ice pick, and a 3/8" nut for a base
 

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The little machine shop I used to work at used cement mixers for tumble deburring and polishing. All that changed was the media... stones for deburr, corn cob for polish.
 

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Leftoverdj said:
You might keep your eyes open for a rummage sale electric ice cream maker. I see them fairly regularly for $5-10. Never tried one for tumbling cases since I have a tumbler, but it's been in back of my mind. Rice works fine as tumbling media, preferably with a little Bon Ami or Dutch Cleanser added.

I've also heard the the commercial guys use concrete mixers, but that's overkill for most of us.

I've also decapped a good many cases with any punch handy, often a blunted ice pick, and a 3/8" nut for a base


Is that electric ice cream maker is really great?



_________________
Manitowoc Ice Machine
 

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I tumble my dirty brass until it's clean in a Thumler's Tumbler (rotary), then the rifle brass gets lubed and resized/deprimed, then it goes back into the tumbler for an hour to get the lube off.
 

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maybe I'm not understanding something.. why do you want to deprime as a separate step.. why not use sizing die?
 

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I can tell you a good reason to do so the first time with a lee decapping rod used with a hammer.

The flash hole has burrs on the inside of the case, when you swat the primer out with a hammer the larger portion of the pin flattens and breaks off these little burrs from the extrusion punch used to make the holes. This creates a more consistant ignition, miniscule but still noticed among the bench shooters, they are using a deburring and flash hole reamer tool to further this.
 

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I use a universal de-capping die for really dirty cases and since I scounge 9mm out of the dirt at the range I use it fairly often. For cleaning I use a ±5% solution of acetic acid, by weight, with a little dish soap. Let the cases soak for a couple of days shaking them every now and then and then rinse them off and dry them (in the oven at about 170°) You can get granulated acetic acid from cooking supply places, Penzey's Spice etc. also know as Sour Sugar. This mix doesn't get them shiny but it does clean off the soot and cleans out the primer pockets.
 

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Ya. Swany... I use a primer pocket reamer myself. So, you are saying the universal primer decapper, or the reamer....one or the other?
 

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No, I'm saying having a universal such as what came in the early Lee handloading kits is a valuable item every loading bench should have. Mine is from a 25-06, and a .22-250 pretty much covers them all. Don't use it often but it is still a handy tool to have.

The seperate universal decapping dies pretty much does the same thing but a little more expensive.

Far as reaming primer pockets only do that with mil surp brass with crimped primer pockets.

I do have a primer pocket uniformer, making them all the same depth for my rifle cases. Large and small (not for pistol cases)

I also have the flash hole reamer deburring tool that looks like a long center drill.
 

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Actually now that I think about it, I don't have the primer pocket reamer.. I meant the flash hole reamer....
So I'm asking ..flash hole reamer or universal deprimer.....one in the same?... as good as each other?
 

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That flash hole tool is called a uniformer, it deburrs and enlarges the flash hole but only slightly. Find one that needs a lot you found a small one, but most only take very little, they do clean up the extrusion burrs. Once in a while you find one that is oversize to start with. I just went through over 800 30-30 cases in RP and found two that were very evident to being oversized from the factory.

The pin depriming deburring will detect an undersize flash hole.

I used a drill for a very long time believe it was a .083 dia.

Having both that's nice, the flash holes need it once the life of the case. They are not one and the same. The drill type tools I think are superior for deburring and uniformity for the size. The decapping tool is a plain heavy duty tool made for the decapping purpose, the hammer driven one has the additional benifit of crushing and pushing back the burrs which in turn gets you more uniform ignition.
 

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I use the Flash Hole Uniformer on new brass, or on once-fired factory stuff after it's been deprimed. There are usually huge variations in the size of the flash hole, since it's punched out, rather than drilled. It also cleans up the burrs quite nicely.
 

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Lee makes an inexpensive universal decapping die that works in all presses. This die does not resize at all. It only removes spent primers and will work on all cases. It provides plenty of leverage to remove even crimped in military primers. The Lee die is excellent for this work -- you only need one for all cartridges and it has a practically indestructible depriming pin. Of course, if you are using military cases with crimped in primers, you will need to ream the primer pockets in a separate operation with a separate tool.
I prefer to remove primers before cleaning -- and many others do the same for various reasons. I do not know, off hand, the exact name, but the most common priming compound is lead based. Removing the primers before cleaning will prevent contaminating the cleaning media with lead and helps prevent other lead related issues here. I use a vibratory cleaner -- the most common type -- rather than a tumbler. With either, but especially the tumbler type, I would think that there would be some case mouth damage and there would be a need to run the cases through a resizing die, at least to true up the case mouth, before trying to seat bullets.
 
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