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Lee makes good basic equipment. The same cannot be said for their progressive presses. You would be better served to save that money towards a Hornady or Dillon machine.
 

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My Lee Pro 1000 got converted to a simple turret press which tells you how I feel about it. Main problem is the priming system. The feed is untrustworthy; there is no "feel" to the priming operation; a cocked primer means a major disassembly operation to get that case out; the whole primer system can blow up with a hell of a bang.

The basic AutoDisk charging system has its problems too, but they are curable by upgrading to the Pro AutoDisk.

Were I ever to try it again, I would size and prime off the press, and use the Pro to bell, charge, seat, and crimp. It does those functions well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Really. I was talking to a guy the other day who just raved about his Progressive 1000. The topic came up after he mentioned he had a bunch of brass for sale cheap. We talked about reloading and he said he really liked reloading with his Lee and recommended that specific unit, the Progressive 1000.

With a progressive, what do you do when after sizing the case is too long? Does it spit it out in another direction?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't know, I'm just listening. I like the idea. Maybe the idea is to size and trim, and then start there. I don't mind sizing and trimming, I can do those pretty quick.
 

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Dillon has a trim die for his machines, but it is pretty expensive. Other than that, removing cases from the cycle to trim is the only way. I believe that most progressive users do not trim cases every time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, I checked it out. Hornady's in my ballpark. I need to do some more research, but otherwise it's a go ahead. Thanks for the info. That was really helpful. 8)
 

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The Lee equipment I have bought and used has been very basic stuff, some has been OK, other has been junk and I have gotten rid of it. I have a Lee single stage press that broke about the 5th time I used it. I now use it as a decapper or crimp press when reloading bottleneck rifle rounds.

I have a Hornady Pro-Jector that I love. I only load pistol rounds on it or .223 and .30-06 rifle rounds as a bullet seater / crimper. I clean my brass after resizing so a progressive press isn't necessary for me for rifle rounds. I also measure each powder charge on a balance scale.

I have had a bit of trouble with the primer feed process, it's a little weak. Sometimes it will snap back and flip the primer or pop it out of the arm completely. I have installed a mirror so I can see on the back side of the press and the primer arm.

I bought it over 10 years ago and never regretted it. I researched every press out there, even RCBS and Dillion, before I bought the Hornady. I am not a Dillion 'moonie' and I didn't think the RCBS was as good as the Hornady.

...just my two rounds worth...

Happy Reloading!
 

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imashooter2 said:
Dillon has a trim die for his machines, but it is pretty expensive. Other than that, removing cases from the cycle to trim is the only way. I believe that most progressive users do not trim cases every time.
Pity that there is no way to trim before sizing, that's how this Dillon user does it.
 

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Who says you can't trim before sizing? My Forster does just fine. So does my drill press. Just need to know how much to allow for sizing change.
 

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Leftoverdj said:
Who says you can't trim before sizing? My Forster does just fine. So does my drill press. Just need to know how much to allow for sizing change.
ah, I was being sarcastic. I thought everbody trimmed before going to the press.
 

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Sorry, Rufus. Some folks trim with the Lee gadget and others with the RCBS dies and a file. Those are non-adjustable and you can't allow for sizing stretching.

Those of us can adjust tend to forget about those who can't and the other way around.
 

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I have several Lee 1000 presses, all of which are now setting in a box in the floor of my loading room. I have several Dillons and love them. No way to beat their service. I haven't used the Hornady but it looks like it is well built. reflex264
 

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I'm sure there is a better way to do it, but when I was loading .223 for competition, I made sizing and trimming a separate operation. When I came back from the range with a sack of brass, I would de-prime that brass and throw it in the cleaner for a little while, after which I would lube, size, and trim if needed. After that, I would throw it all back in the cleaner for a more thorough cleaning, but mainly to clean the lube off the cases. I would then set that brass aside and load it up when I got a good batch together. I completely left the sizing die out of my Dillon and skipped that stage. This method slows the operation down quite a bit, and kind of negates the benefits of the progressive press, but I found it still a lot faster than a single stage. HOWEVER, if I didn't need rounds in such large quantity, I would load them all on a single instead. Actually I didn't mind slowing down a little bit. Loading rounds is kinda like therapy for me. :)
 
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