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Open sights are one big blur. I got a marlin xlr and a Henry 357 and don’t want to put a scope on them. What would be a good sight that would help to see better if there is one? How did you all that have or had this problem fix it.


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I use readers/cheaters with either 1.00 to 1.25 diopter magnification and find it allows for enough focal adjustment that helps a lot. Aggravating as heck as I used to have the eyes of an eagle. Presbyopia sucks.
 

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I am 64 and can't use iron sights any more. Just put a Ranger Point peep on one of my 336's last week. My eyes still center the front sight even if the aperture is blurry. The sight is positioned low and works well with my existing front sight. I do think I will replace my front sight with something brighter though. Hope you find a solution.
 

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after a lifetime of eye issues, particularly for the last 15 years after having Lasic surgery to correct 20/2000 vision (yep, that's -11+ in both eyes), it's been a bit of a struggle at the range. The best they could do was get me to 20/600, which put me immediately back to hard contacts (which I've worn since 1972) to correct the near sightedness and having to wear far sighted correction glasses over those just to get around. I was obviously not a good candidate for Lasic. My vision life started over last summer when I was recommended to see a certain optometrist that had a knack for those issues, and one that was a shotgunner himself. It took 4-6 weeks to find the magic spot, but he fitted me with tri-focal type (basically progressive type lenses) that made a dramatic difference. For the first time in at least 8-10 years, regardless of the combination of contacts and glasses used, I've been able to naturally see the irons (or scopes) on both long guns and handguns, as well as the "target". I'm still amazed.

In my day to day work I have to be able to stand behind a surveying instrument and see distance, look through the scope and clearly manipulate the cross hairs, and then look down and operate the electronics and/or write the data on paper. Before last August that would require contact lenses, one pair of glasses on top for seeing the distances, and another pair of glasses changed out to be able to see the really close stuff. The trifocal contacts, even though they took a few weeks to really adjust to, have really done the trick. That reminds me. I haven't even talked to the eye doc since I walked out of his office last August with my "these should work" contacts. Due to see him in the next couple of weeks for my annual eye check.


jd
 

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It happens to us all at some point. Peep sights greatly help your eye focus as you look through the aperture it has a natural magnification effect. I wear progressive glasses and used peeps up until I turned 60. At which point I could still use them and was good for a maybe three shots and then eye fatigue set in.

I held on as long as possible avoiding scopes but finally gave in and I gotta say, it's nice seeing what I'm shooting at. Until you reach that point, try peep sights and see if that isn't enough as they are a lot better than buck horns.

Jack
 

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I'm fighting it ........and losing. Still strain and try to compensate with the buck horns.

John

John, the more you strain with buck horns the quicker you lose. Do yourself a favor and go with peep sights, your eyes will thank you and you can hold out longer before waving the white flag and scoping your rifles.

Jack
 

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I am 63 and in the same boat as you; eg progressive lenses. I bought a 1895CBA and first tried to use the elkhorn sights and brass bead that came on the rifle, which were good for me out to 50 yards. When I wanted to shot 100 yards I ended up with different sights. The rear is a Skinner Express peep sight and the front is Lyman Globe sight. I experimented with different apertures, but most just didn't let enough light in, so I opted to use the aperture stand alone, which is known as a ghost sight (the aperture stand ring appears as a translucent circle which you center around the front sight (I am now experimenting with a very large aperture that I drilled out which creates a more defined ghost ring). The front aperture insert in the Lyman globe sight is the suspended circle with widest opening of the 4 that came with the sight; the nice thing about the suspended circles and ghost or peep sight, is rather than placing a bead underneath or over your target, you place your target inside the circle. With this set up I'm getting 3"-4" patterns @ 100 yds and I suspect I can do better with more practice..
 

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It happens to us all at some point. Peep sights greatly help your eye focus as you look through the aperture it has a natural magnification effect. I wear progressive glasses and used peeps up until I turned 60. At which point I could still use them and was good for a maybe three shots and then eye fatigue set in.

I held on as long as possible avoiding scopes but finally gave in and I gotta say, it's nice seeing what I'm shooting at. Until you reach that point, try peep sights and see if that isn't enough as they are a lot better than buck horns.

Jack
I can still use a peep out to about 75 yards--after that, forget it! Scopes are on most of my rifles now due to my lousy eyesight and tri-focal glasses.
 

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I'm 81 and have been fighting vision quirks for over twenty years. I gave it up and went scopes. You really don't need a lot of magnification. I use a lot of three and four power scopes. Even the 3.5-10 scopes are pre set at five power. Focus , not power is the key to success. Yes, I know that lots of guys try to compensate with massive amounts of X's. I have an old four power Zeiss that gives more definition than some twenty power scopes of lesser quality.

Try a receiver sight. You might be able to get along for a few extra years with a peep. The way they work, you only nreed to see the front sight against your target.

Best wishes,
 

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I wear progressive lens glasses and have for about 20 years, but I keep a pair of standard bifocals (with the close focus section small and low) for hunting and shooting. I've never been able to see clearly through the corners of the progressive lenses, so the common bifocal pair of glasses is a must for me, scope or open sights.
 

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I`m 62 (another cpl months) and I wear bi-focals. I tried the Williams peep sight on my 336A, it really didnt help at all. If anything I can focus better on the buckhorn than the round peep hole mounted farther back. I ended up taking the peep off and putting the original frt sight back on, and I can shoot just as good if not better with the irons as the peep, which isnt very good. (I would never drill the waffle for a scope) So so at 50 yrds but I wouldnt hunt with it, I`ll used my scoped guns. Poor eyesight and guns is a bummer.
 

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I`m 62 (another cpl months) and I wear bi-focals. I tried the Williams peep sight on my 336A, it really didnt help at all. If anything I can focus better on the buckhorn than the round peep hole mounted farther back.
The technique is to ignore the peep sight, look through the hole and concentrate on the front sight. No thinking about it, the front sight will center naturally.
All you have to worry about is lining up the target with front sight .

BTW I'm 62 wear progressives and have my XLR and my Henry set up as I suggested.
 

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Open sights are one big blur. I got a marlin xlr and a Henry 357 and don’t want to put a scope on them. What would be a good sight that would help to see better if there is one? How did you all that have or had this problem fix it.


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bryanallen,

I am 62 and found the need to switch to shooting peep sights over 10 years ago. Over time, I have moved to tang peep sights. The closer the aperture is to your eye, the better. Also, the size of the aperture matters. The smaller the better the front sight focus. If you are having issues with target focus, consider switching to a globe front sight with an aperture, lolly pop, insert. The front sight aperture also has differnet sizes.

If you have not tried the Williams "Twilight" eye cup with a brass inlet, pick a set up with three different aperture sizes. The brass circle seems to eliminate the fuzz in the rear sight.

I agree with those above, a trip to WalMart or other retailer for 1.0 to 1.25 cheater glasses is also a low cost option.

I just picked up my first pair of perscription glasses from Costco last week. I discussed the need for shooters glasses and he said, no problem. All he needed was the distance from my eye to the front sight and I can fix you up, with a rear aperture. If the Costco Doc can help, I am sure any Eye Doc can help if you go the perscription route.

good luck,
 

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I will add that my experience of one was not good with progressives. I was doing some "light" contracting and remodeling at the time. I would go to the lumber yard and pick out straight boards. When I started to use them, they would be crooked. My thought was that they were warping between purchase and use. That may happen sometimes, but it turned out that if I removed my glasses, the straight boards suddenly became bowed. By the same process reversed, some of the slightly bowed boards suddenly became straight. A trip to the optometrist solved the problem. Trifocals.
 
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