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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a model 94 in 44 mag. I purchased a DRC lever for it & took to my gunsmith to smooth out the action & trigger. The DRC lever will not raise the lifter to chamber the next round. It works just fine when I put the factory lever back in it. My gunsmith has fiddled with it off & on with no luck. Has anyone ran into this? It appears DRC may be out of business?? I have not been able to get ahold of them.
 

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My information below is in relations to those 1894's that use a carrier with the plunger stud (or, the newer style carrier).

If the area of the lever that is just forward of the snail cam is not FLAT for about 1", then that could be part of the problem.

if the thickness of the lever is not wide enough, then that could be part of the problem.

if the lever is tooooo wide at the position where the carrier plunger slides across it, then that could be part of the problem.

First, observe both levers and the way the edges compare just forward of the snail cam.

then 2nd, mike the thicknesses of both levers just forward of the snail cam.

and then 3rd, mike the width of both levers just forward of the snail cam.

Hope this might help alittle.

p.s. - did you try the lever before taking it to your gunsmith?

..........Widder
 

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Heath:

here one other thought I have.

IF you new lever wiggles tooooo much to the left and right, its possible that its pushing away from the plunger in the carrier and bypassing it.

The rising of the carrier during the closing of the lever is determined by the interaction between the lever and the plunger stud in the carrier.

if you aren't getting a good connection of these two parts interacting with one another, then the carrier won't rise up to feed a round into the chamber.


..........Widder
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I checked the lever ahead of the cam & it is thicker on the new lever. I put the screw through both levers (the new lever is on the top). In the last pic you can see where my gunsmith welded to see if it would help.


IMG_20140501_201045_141.jpg IMG_20140501_201133_319.jpg IMG_20140501_201151_007.jpg
 

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Heath,

Is the WIDTH of the new lever wider than the original lever.....particularly in the area in front of the tip of the snail cam.

Feel free to call me if you like.

865 / 984-4455


..........Widder
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
it is also wider in front of the cam

We tried a different lifter just for the hell of it with no luck

I'm headed to my gunsmiths today anyway, so I'm gunna take it back & pass on your thoughts & see if he can maybe machine the new lever to match the old
 

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Heath,

If your gunsmith has any questions, tell him to feel free to call me.

I'm gona try to type this info out but its gona be hard for me to explain in words. But I'll try.

On the left side of the carrier, you will notice the plunger. AND, to the rear of that plunger is what I call a 'saddle' on the carrier. This 'saddle' is actually the stopping block that stops the lever during the cycling process. The distance between the plunger and that 'saddle' must be GREATER than the width of that portion of the lever in front of the snail cam. In other words, the lever HAS to be able to completely pass over that plunger during the OPENING of your action.

THEN, as you start to work your lever up (closing your action) that plunger rides on the flat surface of your lever directly in front of the snail cam.
The plunger riding on that particular point of your lever is what actually causes the carrier to RISE.

When your carrier isn't rising, its normally because that plunger is either broken OR something is prohibiting it from clearing your lever to position itself on that flat surface. And in your case, it appears the WIDTH of your lever is prohibiting its clearance.

If I've made this sound clear as mud, my apologies. Its alot easier to verbally explain than it is to type out.....atleast for me.

In reducing the width of your lever, please ask your gunsmith to make sure he focuses on the side of the lever that appears to be the problem. One side actually may have a bad burr or machined wrong. He should know what to check for and how best to fix it.....assuming this is your basic problem.

I hope this info helps.

Let me just add that I hope I don't have you chasing a rabbit. But based on your description of the problem, this would be one of the first items I would check out.

..........Widder
 

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Heath,

If your gunsmith has any questions, tell him to feel free to call me.

I'm gona try to type this info out but its gona be hard for me to explain in words. But I'll try.

On the left side of the carrier, you will notice the plunger. AND, to the rear of that plunger is what I call a 'saddle' on the carrier. This 'saddle' is actually the stopping block that stops the lever during the cycling process. The distance between the plunger and that 'saddle' must be GREATER than the width of that portion of the lever in front of the snail cam. In other words, the lever HAS to be able to completely pass over that plunger during the OPENING of your action.

THEN, as you start to work your lever up (closing your action) that plunger rides on the flat surface of your lever directly in front of the snail cam.
The plunger riding on that particular point of your lever is what actually causes the carrier to RISE.

When your carrier isn't rising, its normally because that plunger is either broken OR something is prohibiting it from clearing your lever to position itself on that flat surface. And in your case, it appears the WIDTH of your lever is prohibiting its clearance.

If I've made this sound clear as mud, my apologies. Its alot easier to verbally explain than it is to type out.....atleast for me.

In reducing the width of your lever, please ask your gunsmith to make sure he focuses on the side of the lever that appears to be the problem. One side actually may have a bad burr or machined wrong. He should know what to check for and how best to fix it.....assuming this is your basic problem.

I hope this info helps.

Let me just add that I hope I don't have you chasing a rabbit. But based on your description of the problem, this would be one of the first items I would check out.

..........Widder
WOW - you explained it really well Widder. Sorry to take up space with Widder's entire quote in my reply, but this is an example of the knowledge available here on MOF. I'm sure there may be others as knowledgable in the fine tuning of a Marlin action, but the OP is hearing this from to top. Thanks for the info Widder.

- hutch
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It now feeds about 2/3 of the time, the strange thing is he didn't change anything. Apparently something he did last time it was there helped & we didn't play with it enough to find out it is even more picky about the ammo now than it was before. Any flat nose is out for sure. He loads rem 240gr for his & those cycle in mine somewhat. My boss loads sierras for his & they cycle about the same. Does anyone load hornady xtp? I'm thinking that's what I'm gunna try next, should work. Something else I've noticed is that the faster I work the lever, the better it feeds. Do all the 94s act that way? Or just mine?
 

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I would Definitely Try the XTP's. They have a rather Long Nose Profile. Almost Cone Like.
They Feed Totally Reliably in my .357 1894 100% of the time. Even when I cycle it Slowly.
From what I have Read Here, The Shorter Bullet Profiles Cause Feeding Problems.
Also Cycling the Action Slowly or Canted to One Side, May Cause Feeding Problems too.
Mine Will NOT Feed Wadd Cutters At All. Jambs it Right Up, 1st round.
In Mine, Round Nose Feed Better than JHP & the XTP's Feed Best of All.
UncleSarge58
 

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A lot of lever action rifles have a preference in one way or another when it comes to bullets, not just the Marlins.

that being said, there are some rifles that seem to be happy with about anything you put in them.

My .32, .38 Comp and .45 Colt 1894's will feed anything you put in them. Bullet style or weight makes no difference.

I agree with UncleSarge.....try the XTP. They are good bullets.

When a Marlin is properly tuned and 'tweaked', it should run basically 100% of the time, barring any broken springs or bad ammo.

Cowboy Action shooters put thousands of rounds thru them every year and some of those 1894's are legendary for reliability and speed.

One other thing...its not unusual for an 1894 to feel smoother when you run it alittle hard and faster. BUT, they can be tuned to feel buttery smooth and reliable even when working the action slow.


..........Widder
 
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