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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you seal your primers on your reloads?, I was thinking about doing this on the loads that I use for hunting. Seems like every year we end up hunting in some heavy snow and somtimes rain. Thought it would be a good idea. When I was looking at the sealer it also states that it will seal bullet to case joints, I am not sure about this. On cast loads I would think that the bullet lube would provide a perfect moisture seal but what about jacketed bullets? is it nessacary?. Your opinions please.
 

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Hello Riflemen-As usual I do have an opinion on primer sealers. If you live in the tropics and hunt during the rainy season then perhaps it's useful. I live in the Oregon coastal range and our wet weather doesn't warrant this proceedure. Only extreme conditions will allow a primer to leak. If they leak then they will leak gas pressure on discharge and this doesn't happen on a good cartridge. If you are wading through chest high rice patties where your ammo is under water then a sealer is useful as well. In brief, it is my opinion that short of very extreme conditions this reloading step is uneccessary. Maybe Golsovia from the cold damp north will check in on this. Life is good, BestLever
 

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Even under normal horrible conditions fir this part of the world, ammo rarely fails due to wet. I never have had problems with ammo carried in the gun or coat pocket. The only time I ever have had ammo which has gotten wet inside is when it's actually been under water (like in a boat or bottom of a grub box when something leaked.)

I am glad that waterfowl type loads for shotguns are sealed; that seems to help a lot. For rifle though, the only ammo I ever seal is the stuff I load with no intention of shooting it up for five years or more but stuff which will get carried a lot anyway. (My bear gun loads.) Usually this is ammo which has a fairly pricey bullet and may be subject to many wetting cycles along with warming and cooling where expansion/contraction issues may draw moisture in. All I've ever sealed is the primer; I use nail polish, usually some left over gaudy color which someone is discarding, and I wipe off the excess so it only remains in the groove around the primer's circumference - I don't think a layer of lacquer on the primers surface would enhance ignition at all!

If I was going to swim with my ammo I'd certainly seal the bullet as well.

Overall, it's a lot of trouble for something which probably gains little or any real advantage. I wouldn't trust ammo which was laying in water for hours anyway. I guess if I was using that ammo for shooting at enemy targets like they do in the military I'd probably want whatever advantage I might gain since that is life or death and MOA type concerns probably take second chair to quantity over quality shooting anyway. I don't think it hurts anything though and sometimes the confidence factor is worth a bit of extra trouble or expense, kind of like using a premium bullet at all times even though it isn't really necessary.
 

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What a great thread. Have not even thought of this. Don't need to here. Never have any moisture in excess during hunting season.
 

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Submersion will kill ammo. Never had any problem with ammo that merely got damp. I did have a buddy who loaded a batch for long term storage who sealed both primers and bullets. He hunted around and found a milspec asphalt compound for the bullets. That was 20-30 years ago and I have no idea where he found it.

I know that people use nail polish to seal primers, but I am leary. That stuff has powerful solvents in it. Artists acrylic paint is water based and thick. I'd be comfortable with that. I'd be comfortable using that to seal the bullet if I seated the bullet about halfway up the cannelure first and then filled the cannelure.
 

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Here are some perfect candidates for primer sealer:



They weren't, however, sealed when they were loaded. :cry: So, what odds would you give them of firing?

These are, BTW, a handful of cartridges which have been in the boat for two years stored inside of a boat box which has gotten "wet" as in dunked a couple of times.






















They went 5 for 5 BTW.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well this is good to know, I did not look forward to sealing primers if it was nessacary. Thanks
 

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If you take military ammo and drop it in water,even leave it for long times, its chance of fireing when picked up and used is excellent.
If you carry it for weeks through rain and sun and swamps it will almost alway's fire,even years later.Any military ammo I've ever seen is sealed does this mean you have to take this precaution?Not hardly,If I was getting ammo ready for the crash of civilization,The appocalypse,Ice age or a Nuclear winter of long duration or maybe even a hurricane or sunami I would definately add it to the process of reloading .I've even put enough consideration into the idea for hunting here where I live that I keep a bottle of clear laquer aroiund around but I've alway's lazed out before using it and to tell the truth,I've only had about 1 misfire from my handloads.I've had more from coomercially loaded ammo.'I guess it's up to you! 8) :? :) shootrj2003
 

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Do you need to? 98.37% chance you don't.
Do you want to? Then use nail polish...of course.
 
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