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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am looking at a 336 (I believe) a .35 Remington. serial #G59080. Rifle is clean looks to be older. Says he bought in the early 70's, from original owner (whom since passed away). Doesn't know exact date of manufacture. Has a peep, and a Marbles rear diamond open site and fiber optic front. Also, has original sites (rear open and front). Somewhere? Needs to locate. A good friend of mine. I want to give what the rifle is worth. Any ideas?

Thankx:


Ironminer
 

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pasted away? wonder what kinda paste. rifle prices depend on condition, location, model, etc. etc. really good pictures would help. find another marlin 336 on a rack someplace that's in the same condition, then add a c-note (or two) fer bein' a waffletop with ballard rifling. just my opinion, others may disagree.
mind yer topknot!
windy
 

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Without pictures its difficult to get a handle on the condition. Ever a "classic" rifle is worth a lot less if its in poor condition. If your area has a high cost of living than other places in the country, then the price will be higher. I am in Central PA and in the rural areas a 35 REM in good condition sells for $350 to $400. I have seen some with asking prices of $500 and $550, but I don't know if they were sold for that price.

Windy mentioned a Waffle top. If that is a Waffle top Marlin, they were not made for an extended period of time and usually can bring more $$$ provided they are in very good condtion. If so $100 or so more than a non waffle top. My guestimates are based on private sales. If you were at a LGS, the prices would be higher.

Provided that rifle is in good condition, it would be a good rifle to own. After 1983 rifles needed to add a "real" safety, hence the illustrious "Cross Bolt Safety". Generally, rifles that pre-date that safety are in demand.

Try asking the man what he will take for it in cash. If he hits you with a real high price, pass. If not, make a deal.


Cheers!


Mike T.
 

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Interestingly, even a collectible firearm is only worth what the next person is willing to pay for it.
Ive seen many a rifle which should have been worth $1000 sit unsold as nobody was willing to commit to that price.
Was the rifle truly worth $1000?
Possibly, but only to the right person, and at the right time.

A early year Marlin in excellent condition can be worth $500 and more to a well informed collector, however your just as likly in my area to be offered the average selling price of $375 which a nice Marlin 336 will bring.

I would suggest if your friend is wishing to sell his rifle that you simply ask him what price he is comfortable with, and then make your decision afterwards. This would resolve your desire to have a fair deal for you and your friend. Nice rifles come and go, but good friends are priceless.
 

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to me that 1950 336 is the best year for marlins. You don't give a model but I am guessing 336SC or 366A,I don't think they made an RC in 35cal. that year (could be wrong). If the waffle top is un-drilled and the rest is in good condition I would pay 500.00 for it anytime. I have both the A & SC from 1950, they are the best rifles I own. BUY IT.
 

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Triggerjerk:

The problem with trying to sell a 30-30 is that they are as common as dirt. I see a constant stream of Marlin 30-30's on Internet sales sites every week. About 18 months ago I bought a Marlin 336a 30-30 Waffle Top with a 24" barrel made in 1948 for $310 at an estate Auction. Most bidders dropped out when the bid price went over $240. There was only one other bidder past that point and I had decided to buy it.

Your rifle is in much better condition that my 336a, but I didn't buy it to collect it, I bought it to shoot it. My rifle has some pitting on the bluing, but I really don't care, the rifle is deadly accurate, its a great range gun, and with the 24" barrel I can get a slightly higher muzzle velocity from this rifle. I wouldn't hesitate to take it deer hunting.

I suspect as time goes on your rifle will increase in value. It is truly a fine example of a quality vintage Marlin rifle. :rock:



Cheers!


Mike T.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
to me that 1950 336 is the best year for marlins. You don't give a model but I am guessing 336SC or 366A,I don't think they made an RC in 35cal. that year (could be wrong). If the waffle top is un-drilled and the rest is in good condition I would pay 500.00 for it anytime. I have both the A & SC from 1950, they are the best rifles I own. BUY IT.
Where do I find the model at? It is a waffle top... Not drilled and tapped and a clean firearm.
 

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The rifle would go for $350. to $400. around here. If that peep sight is vintage and say a Redfield it alone can bring between $100. and $200. I saw a Redfield sight on Ebay go for $137.50 last week. So a nice Redfield peep and the rifle would be about $500.00 most days.
 

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Where do I find the model at? It is a waffle top... Not drilled and tapped and a clean firearm.
You should find the Model number in the roll stamp on the barrel, e.g. Model 336RC, Model 336SC, Model 336A, Model 336ADL. Also,
the gun's serial number should appear, in addition to the one under the lever, stamped into the inletting of the butt stock and also on the side the top tang. A partial number may be electro-penciled on the bottom of the bolt.
Hope this helps...
 

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The Model Number should be right on the barrel underneath "The Marlin Firearms" etc etc. It should also state the caliber.

Mike T.
 
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