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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was at my lgs looking for an older Marlin.He has a pre 64 Winchester 1894 in 30 30 .It is in excellent cond.He wants $475,but I know I can get it for around $400 since I do tile work for the owner of the shop.Anyway,I checked the serial # and it is a 1963.It says made in the USA .But so do the 1966 and 1968 models.And they look the same except for the color of the stocks.The 1963 is Walnut?The others are a golden wood.What is the difference between the pre 64's and the later ones?And one last question.Was the 1963 model 1894 made in New Haven Ct? It only says made in USA.I don't know about Winchesters as I do about Marlins and I don't want to end up with junk.
 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms!
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Post '64s used many manufacturing shortcuts, including stampings, and castings. Winchester was near the foreskin of MIM technology, however, I do not know what year they went into the '94. Remington is the king of MIM. (Metal Injection Molding) At a good price it should be perfectly serviceable. Its like the difference between a 1903 and 1903A3 Springfield. AC
 

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Take the PRE 64, don't buy the other rifles. The Pre 64's were made of all Forged Steel, no sheet metal or stamped parts, no hollow pins as the Post 63's have. Winchester tried to cut costs starting with Serial number 2,700,000. Winchester die hards did NOT like the poor quality of those rifles compared to what they made before 1964. The Pre 64 is a genuine Winchester rifle, those that came after are not.

Yes they were all made in America, but they are not the same firearm.


Mike T.
 

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You can pick up a pre 64 Win and automatically know the difference. The color of the wood, the lever stays shut on a pre 64. I guess what I am trying to say is the fit and finish is great on a pre 64. They were and still are great rifles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The serial on the 1963 Winchester 1894 was 2577816 or close if I remember correctly.It did not say New Haven Ct like some of the ones I have seen at the range.Does anyone know where that model was made? All it says is USA
 

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Sorry I lost track of this thread. I don't know why the barrel does not say New Haven Ct when others that you've seen all have New Have Ct on them. I do believe that all American made Winchesters were made in New Haven. The company was sold in 1980 to the employees. Eventually they were unable to compete and closed the New Haven plant in 2006.


Cheers!


Mike T.
 
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I really don't know why people disparage post 64 American made Winchesters like they do. I have owned half a dozen post 64 94 Winchesters and four pre 64 94 Winchesters and could tell no operational difference between them. The post 64 rifles were all accurate and 100 percent reliable, just as much so as the pre-64 guns. The most accurate of the whole lot was a post 64 which I still have to this day and have been shooting it for nearly forty years and it has never, not one time, jammed or malfunctioned in any way. At fifty yards it will shoot one ragged hole groups with iron sights. It has killed more deer than I can remember., and once saved me from two Doberman pincers who attacked me in the woods. I promise you they learned respect for a post 64 Winchester, it was the last thing they ever learned.
 

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The price of $400 for a pre-'64 Model 94 is a great price for one in excellent condition. Even at $475 it's a good price. If you are looking to buy it, I wouldn't wait too long. Winchesters do bring a higher dollar for some reason.

Bill
 

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The Pre64's had no stamped parts, or sheet metal in the action, and no hollow pins. However, the difference that I have seen is when you use the lever, the Post 64s have more "play". Hollow pins do not last as long as solid ones, but until you have a problem with any of them, they work too.

From what I have read and have seen for myself, for several years after Winchester tried to change the Model 94 to reduce cost in the mid sixties and possibly into the early seventies where the most troublesome of the Post 64s.

Instead of Forged Steel receivers that held the blueing without noticeable signs of wear for decades, the Post 64's used a method similar to making ceramics for their receivers. Now, those receivers were very strong, as were the Forged steel receivers, where they ran into problems was with trying to blue those receivers. The blueing wore like paint and came off must faster. Take a look at a Post 64 that has been used on a regular basis, most if not all the blueing has worn off. I have seen them at auctions, and gun shows. The Post 64's did not hold up quite as well as the Pre 64's. Some of the old timers that I know that bought Model 94's in the mid seventies told me that they thought that Winchester had "worked some of the bugs out of them" by that time, and did not run into any real problems with their rifles. Some folks still complained about the "slop" in the lever when it was all the way down, but they were still a Winchester, and functioned pretty well.

Last year I saw a Post 64 in a LGS that looked like it was hardly used and was priced at $425.00. But I have seen others with lower prices. Fact is, I have more 30-30's than I could ever make use of and buying any more of the caliber would be pointless. But other folks that want a light rifle that packs a punch, that is easy to move around in brush country, the Model 94 is a good choice. Some of my Marlins are heavier rifles and larger calibers, so I believe I have the best of both worlds.

The only thing I can add is that if you find a Post 64 in great condition and was made from the early to mid seventies on, it is still a good gun and can be had for a reasonable price.



Cheers!


Mike T.
 
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