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So this is certainly an interesting conversion project, pistol grip to straight that is. I am contemplating doing this to my Western Field/Marlin .30-30. The serial number is stamped on the lower tang. It is also stamped on the side of the upper tang (without the letter prefix however). I consider it odd that the serial number is stamped on a part of the firearm that is removable.
Since the serial number is also on the upper tang (permanently attached to the receiver), is it possible/legal/advisable to perform a pistol grip to straight grip conversion?
 

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The thing that makes it illegal is if you alter or remove it. Alter = making it a different number. Removing it means you don't restamp it after you cut the tang. Your gun is not altered or removed if you restamp it after you cut the tang. The newer guns have the number stamped in the side of the action.
 

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I know this is an old thread, but I felt it pertinent. A couple years ago, I purchased a 1958 Marlin SC. I totally dislike the pistol grip, so bought a straight floorplate, finger lever and butt stock. Just recently, I got into a discussion concerning serial numbers, and that rifle no longer had one, just a partial on the upper tang. I was not happy. I pulled out the original floorplate and after comparing notes, I called my son in law, a very talented metal worker, and he agreed to tackle the project of making the pistol grip floorplate and finger lever fit the straight grip stock. I've left his work in the white as I love his polish job. First pic is before and then the after pics. Old Girl got her numbers back!
 

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Looks great. I too prefer straight stocks, but that original butt stock is one fine looking piece of wood.
 

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Looks great. I too prefer straight stocks, but that original butt stock is one fine looking piece of wood.
That fine looking piece of wood was not original. City Slicker carved that himself. Yes, he did a fine job, but it wasn't straight grip and looked too nice to alter, so I sent it back (for a refill, LOL) and we both were very happy.
 

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That's what i was told. The only place I found the full serial number on this 1958 was on the lower tang. I took the path of least resistance. Now, I've got a couple of sets of unmolested floor plates and finger levers for straight grips - LOL.
 

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Technically, any firearm made before GCA '68 doesn't need to be serial numbered and it's still legal. I have an old Savage/Stevens rifle made in the 40's or 50's and it has no serial number. The lower cost .22's and single shot break open shotguns are often found with no numbers if made before 1968.
 
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Technically, any firearm made before GCA '68 doesn't need to be serial numbered and it's still legal. I have an old Savage/Stevens rifle made in the 40's or 50's and it has no serial number. The lower cost .22's and single shot break open shotguns are often found with no numbers if made before 1968.
Totally true, but I believe "if it was given a serial number at the factory, then it has to stay with it unmolested" - so that was my premise for doing what I did and I don't need to tangle with the authorities no how.

In my grandfather's gun cabinet drawer was an old revolver with the serial numbers filed off. Grampie wouldn't let anyone use it and didn't like it dragged out and looked it. Sometime between 1969, when I went in the service, and 1973, when he passed away, that revolver disappeared. Dad figured Grampie had taken it out to the hunting grounds and deposited it in the back of one of the peat bogs Maine is famous for. All because the serial numbers were "gone". Path of least resistance...
 
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