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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone use peep sights or aperture sights for big game hunting? Just wondering how they work at various ranges under hunting situations. Has anyone used them in the mountains for sheep/goats?
 

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I am using a Williams peep this year for deer in Ohio on a Winchester 94 in 375 Winchester. One inch high at 50 yards should give a 4-inch kill zone on level and steep ground to 150 yards with a 200-grain bullet at 2100 fps.

I have one-inch groups 3 bullets from a rest at 50 yards. Larger aperture holes thru the peep let more light in at the expense of accuracy. I shot M 16's at Camp Perry with open sights at 200 yards last summer and was amazed at the accuracy.

Who needs a scope?
 

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I find good peep sights to be fine for my normal hunting areas (where shots are generally limited to 150 yards max), the only time they fall a bit short is a few minutes early in the day and a few minutes late in the day when the light is poor. Those times, probably not more than 10 minutes total in a long hunting day, a scope beats the peeps for me. But I quite often carry a peep-sighted rifle in spite of that small disadvantage, because the light weight and quick handling are so apparent when compared to any scoped rifle.
 

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I have an XS ghost ring on my 1895 that is used mostly in the woods (with my eyeglasses). It has worked well for many years and useful at the shooting range to 200 yards. I am going to try a scout set-up this year though.
 

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I've had Williams Fool Proof peep sights on my levers for better than 30 years. They're perfect for deer up here in the north woods where shots are normally under 125yds and closer. But, for sheep hunting, I'd use my 3x9 Leupold sighted 270.
 

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I've used (notice the past tense) peep sights for woods hunting. A sheep/goat hunt might be a once in a lifetime event. I can't imagine taking a peep sight on a goat hunt.

+ 1
 

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I've used (notice the past tense) peep sights for woods hunting. A sheep/goat hunt might be a once in a lifetime event. I can't imagine taking a peep sight on a goat hunt.
That's what I was thinking. Here in Washington, a bighorn sheep tag or a mountain goat tag is truly a "once-in-a-lifetime" tag... IF THAT. I've been applying for many years and have yet to be drawn for either. I fear that I will be too old and beat-up for mountain hunting if I'm ever drawn.

Although I really like, and use, peep/receiver sights, they would not be my first choice for such a hunt. I'd likely choose my very accurate 30-06 with the simple & rugged 6x Leupold with good bases and rings. I've taken elk and bear with it, out beyond 300 yards, am sure I could do as well on mountain goat or bighorn sheep.

IF I drew the tag, and IF I was still tough enough for one of those rough-country hunts.

Regards, Guy
 

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the main reason I was questioning about this rifle is it is by far my lightest. My .30 06, .300 win mag, and 6.5x55 are all on the heavy side to carry up the side of a mountain. But I could make it work I'm sure.
By taking your "lightest" rifle, you may find out that throwing rocks at your target will get the same results. If taking any of the others are deemed "too heavy", get your butt in shape so they don't feel "too heavy" any more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Lol well put and honestly a good answer. This will be my first time hunting mountians and all people preach is take a rifle 7.5lbs or lighter and the the other mentioned ones are around or over 8lbs.
 

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Lol well put and honestly a good answer. This will be my first time hunting mountians and all people preach is take a rifle 7.5lbs or lighter and the the other mentioned ones are around or over 8lbs.
I wasen't implying you were not going to get into shape either.

I've done a fair amount of hunting elk in the Rockies toting a #10 (loaded) scoped .338 WM, and the last thing that bother's me is the gun weight. Altitude and the climb and all the stuff you'll be carrying on your person are what will get you first. I have to believe that hunting elk is a lot less strenuous on the body then sheep. Those critters live in some really rough/tough terrain. Your going to want a rangefinder if you don't already have one.

If you do go, I wish you the best of luck on your hunt.
That is a hunt I'd have loved to do. But for me, that ship has sailed.
 

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Anyone use peep sights or aperture sights for big game hunting? Just wondering how they work at various ranges under hunting situations. Has anyone used them in the mountains for sheep/goats?
If you look at most big game rifles and large caliber big game backup pistols they all are equipped with "Express sights". These sights give you a clear view for a quick snap shot. They are meant for close up quick snap shots in heavy brush no more than 100 yrds. For far shots you should use optics and give yourself the most advantage that you can get to make the shot. Unless you are well versed with military match peep sights and already have the dope on using them with a certain load ---do yourself a favor and use optics.
 
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