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At what time in your life do you begin passing your collection on to your children? Do you give them what you think they would want? Do you consult with them about what they like? I would rather start giving them guns while I’m around than have my wife just open the safe and say take what you want. I have a son and a daughter (whose husband is my hunting buddy) as my heirs. I believe both would be grateful for whatever they got. My son loves lever action rifles and the son-in-law is more into ARs and bolt guns (although he hunts deer with a JM 30-30 I gave him. Think he feels obligated because I always tell him it’s perfect for where we hunt.) Right now I think I’ll put a tag on each gun with the name of who I want to have it. I’ll begin handing them out as the spirit hits me. Any thoughts you guys would like to share would be appreciated. :joyman:
 

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my dad passed away back in October.
He left me in charge of his collection, with specific instructions
as to who gets what...and who gets nothing.

I think after dealing with this, when i get to a certain point,
i'm going to start giving some of mine away.
Hard thing is, like you said....when?
I don't think there's a good answer to that.
My dad knew he was on short time...and i think he would have
dealt with it himself but he didn't want to and finally
at the end he just couldn't.
I guess the best answer is, do it before it's too late.
 

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I have received one gun from a dear friend after he passed away. He told me to pick one out. I wished he would have given it to me before he passed and then I could have told him how good I was shooting skeet with it. He would have gotten a big kick out of that.

So I would keep a minimum for you to hunt with and give them out asap. Tell them they can't sell them until you pass, but hope they will use them and tell you stories about them. That is what I would want. I only have one stepson and he is a college professor, so his hunting times are limited. I think I will sell down to a few really nice guns and give him and the grand kids them before the final hunt!!
 

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My 0.02

Find out if your heirs are interested. Not all young folks are interested. My three sons have little to no interest in my collected arms, nor do they live in areas where they would be able to shoot without a significant degree of expense or difficulty. Giving them my fire arms would only result in them getting sold. It is not unheard of for heirs with no interest and no knowledge to sell their relative's guns at a pawn shop.

I have a book that (hopefully) my wife knows about listing my firearms, receipts, prices paid, etc. Worse comes to worse she could look there and get some idea what they are worth. Eventually, I will suggest a trusted friend who could help her sell them. Don't make the mistake of letting her sell them for what you told her you paid for them--that's a joke...)

There is a good amount of enjoyment in being there yourself when you give away a gun to someone who will cherish and appreciate it. I hope to be able to do that more than a few times before I'm done.

At the point where my interest is waning and my abilities are seriously compromised, I will sell most of the remaining arms myself. It is not fair to my wife to have to do it. Hopefully I can get more for them than they would garner at auction--particularly considering commissions. And I'll only keep a few home protection firearms.

This is proportionately more important according to how large your collection is. And especially true if you have been a collector of particularly historical and valuable weapons. Look for interest in other collectors. Practically the only other option after your death would be to have the collection sold at a nation auction house. That may or not be the way you want it to happen.

Case in point. My father-in-law's widowed neighbor asked me to look at her late husband's Luger. Well, it wasn't a Luger, it was a Walther P38, from 1941 98% + condition, 3 digit serial number, two matching serial numbered mags, and a leather holster. She had previously been offered $500 for it. I spoke to one WWII dealer who told me he'd give her 3500.00 sight unseen. She and I had a long
talk about where and how to sell it, when she's ready. It was her FILs WWII bring back. He was a tank commander.

Her late husband gave her no instructions or information about this Walther. She had no idea.


IMG_0546.jpg IMG_0547.jpg IMG_0548.jpg IMG_0549.jpg IMG_0550.jpg IMG_0551.jpg

Not a pleasant topic, but it really is best to work these things out yourself, while you still can.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Markopolo50 comments hit home. I’m sure I would get way more enjoyment seeing them in the hands of my kids than sitting in the safe. And a good friend that lets me hunt his 87 acres exclusively deserves the Browning Citori I’ve had for 25 years (shot twice, cleaned dozens of times).
 

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Don’t give away that Marlin 30AW just yet, enjoy it for at least a couple of hunts. I don’t think I could have a Citori and only shoot it twice.
 

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My wife knows which ones go to who but if they are not interested then I have educated her as to what their worth is so she can sell to an FFL. Our current State is run by Commie anti-gun politicians so they make it very hard to pass to family. Lucky I have an FFL who is also a judge (conservative) who can help my wife disperse the firearms and get what they are worth. Don't wait and talk it over with those who will appreciate the firearm passing down to them.
 

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Several years before my dad died, he requested that "the Children" come home for a "Family Get-together" and conference.
The family dinner was great and like old times.
The Conference was in regards to "things" in the house that we and/or our spouses would like to have. The jist of that was he requested we go through the house with our respective spouse and make a list of the "things" we would like to have.
There were no promises the "like to have's" would be honored, but at least he had an idea of who would like to have whatever. It worked well, at least for us. Something like that could work for your collection - then if you felt the time was right, you could "gift" those guns when and how you pleased - or not.
Just a thought.

WYT-P
Skyhunter
 

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Great information above. Something else to consider is the changing gun laws and universal background checks. They are already the case in some state and I think it will be the law of land( unfortunately) sooner or later. This will mean a cost to give a gun to your heirs. Another good reason to pass them on while you are alive and before the government interferes. As far as getting rid of those that won’t go to a loved one, I recommend an auction house that specializes in firearms.
 

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I'm 60, my son is 30. I began the process of passing my guns on to him several years ago, one at a time on birthdays, Christmas etc.
He likes to shoot and is an avid hunter so he appreciates what is being given to him. I've got quite a few years left in me and enough guns to pass along to last me another 10-15 years. If I live long enough I'll always keep a few for around the house up to the day I die.
 

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I watched my grandparents get robbed in their golden years including what I believe was a very rare Ballard and a clock who's twin is on proud display at the Smithsonian, I know my child could never care for all that's in the big iron box and I'm toying with the idea of calling an auctioneer even as I pursue new acquisitions, marlinitis has crept deep in my bones. but I know none of us live forever.
if you have children or relatives that would appreciate and care for your treasured items you might as well get the joy of watching them enjoy while your still able.
 

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A gun trust may be a good idea. It's not cheap, I got pricing of $650 to $850, but at least if you pass, the state you live
in won't tie up your firearms in probate, or confiscate them all together. That may happen if you don't designate beneficiaries.
 

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My parents moved to a retirement facility a few years ago. This was a huge downsizing for them. Dad specifically asked me what I wanted of his firearms. I told him of the two that I really wanted. He then split up the rest between my brother and myself. My brother isn't much into the shooting sports...but he does enjoy getting out at times.

Anyway...my advice is to ask the kids what they want...and resolve any disputes now. I believe you will find it easier. Also...make it known to them...that if YOU want to use a firearm...that it is still available to YOU at any time. (if the collection is geographically close enough to you to make this practical)...as long as they know it will return to them...they shouldn't have a problem with it.

my $0.02

redhawk
 

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... Right now I think I’ll put a tag on each gun with the name of who I want to have it. I’ll begin handing them out as the spirit hits me. Any thoughts you guys would like to share would be appreciated. :joyman:
I have NFA so while tags on things is nice for heirs who play well together it doesn't have a lot of legal weight. Everything I own belongs to a trust, trustees and beneficiaries are listed in the trust.

I paid <$300 for my trust from this guy https://www.myguntrust.com/about-us but there are less expensive alternatives out there that are just at solid, ask around.
 

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Those of you with "outdoor" kids are fortunate. NONE of the kids/grand kids are that type, unless you count golf courses. When my hunting/shooting days are done I'll have to dispose of them myself one way or another. Hard decision to make although I've taken two to a gun shop for consignment sale. Depending on how well that works out I'll either keep taking some, or look at alternative choices.

From the time you are young you have a great illusion of immortality. Other people die not you ... Then when you have a life changing illness you lose that illusion and you know it can happen to you.
 

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An uncle of mine died several months ago. He left several hundred firearms and no will. Right now all the gun are in the oldest son's garage and they belong to "all the children equally". He had two sons and two daughters. I'm waiting till something happens to on his kids and the spouses and grandkids get interested in their "share" of the guns. I'm thinking it's only a matter of time till things get ugly. If you have more than one kid, I'd advise anyone to have a will spelling out exactaly how things will be divided up. I've seen a number of close familys torn apart over estates.
 
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