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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You may or may not have bumped into the term "Overlanding" being used to describe making journeys that require the use of a vehicle that handles off-pavement travel well. Usually this means a well set-up 4x4 rig of some sort.


This isn't "rock crawling." It's not "mud bogging." It's not "desert racing." It's taking a trip into some awesome, sometimes very remote, areas via a 4-wheel drive rig. It can be as simple as a weekend trip to somewhere cool, or as complex as shipping a vehicle to another continent and going on a journey of several months duration.


For instance I read reports from a fellow who is well into his trip, driving his Jeep around the perimeter of the African continent! I think he's two years into the trip now. My trips pale in comparison, many are just weekend trips with an organization known as Northwest Overland. Sometimes however the route is longer.


I've led the 600 mile overlanding route known as the WABDR or Washington Backcountry Discovery Route, from Oregon to Canada several times. It has about 100 miles of pavement, but the rest is dirt on Forest Service and BLM lands mostly.


My trip on the White Rim Road in Canyonlands National Park earlier this year is what we'd call "overlanding" these days. Some of my friends also did a trip to the Maze District of Canyonlands, often regarded as the most remote place in the lower 48 states. It requires a vehicle to be capable of 300 miles of off-pavement travel without any resupply, and their trip lasted nearly a week. There is no drinkable water available in that area!


I'm mentioning it here, because a lot of us hunters have a vehicle that is very capable of doing this sort of thing, and sometimes in hunting season we're already doing something very much like it, though we hunters tend to drive to a good campsite and establish a base camp, rather than moving camp daily. It's something to perhaps consider in the spring or summer, if you're looking for something interesting to do. Overlanding can easily be coupled with other outdoor activities such as hiking, backpacking, mountain biking, rock collecting, photography, fishing, or even hunting.


Canyonlands, White Rim Road:







Death Valley, Titus Canyon:



Fridge in the back of my Jeep is a wonderful addition!



A NWOL group silly enough to follow me in Central Washington earlier this year:



Typical campsite for me, this one near Donner Pass, California:



There was NO SNOW when I went to bed in my little tent the night before!



Roof Top Tents are popular with some:



Sometimes it's a pretty rough road. Note that the Toyota ran out of suspension travel, and the passenger side front tire has lifted up, off the ground:



My little Jeep, taking me across a stream on one of our trips last year:



So - consider getting involved in this if you enjoy getting out. Can be done individually, with a few friends or family, or with an organized group like Northwest Overland. All are enjoyable.


Regards, Guy
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just read an article a few days ago where these "overlanders" have a yearly convention of sorts.....with lots of vendors showing off new gear and crazy built rigs. It is intriguing to say the least.
Ya, there's a big expo, and several regional "expos" or "rallies." We do the Northwest Overland Rally here in Washington. There are others around the country, and one in British Columbia as well. I've only been to the Northwest Overland Rally. It's a hoot. I go year after year and am one of the "trail leaders" taking people out on interesting 4x4 runs in the area. My oldest son is also a trail leader now.

About the Northwest Overland Rally

Guy
 
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