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Do the new 41 Marlin's have oversized bores? On another forum, there has been talk about new Marlin rifles having oversized bores. Apparently someone purchased a new rifle, had accuracy problems, slugged the rifle and the bore was .002 oversized. After the subject was posted, more people checked their rifles and found their bores oversized. Have any of you slugged your rifle (new production) and checked the bore? I would like to know if new 30-30, 35, and 44 Marlins are oversized as well.

I have a problem "wanting" to purchase a new Marlin. You should not have to smooth the action, rework the trigger to reduce the poundage, firelap the barrel to remove the speed bumps (constriction cause by dove tails for the rear sight or where the barrel is screwed in the receiver), and now an oversized barrel. I love Marlin rifles, but what has happened to their quality control?

Instead of purchasing a new Marlin rifle and keeping the company in business, more and more people are trying to find older Marlin rifles in good condition or purchasing a different brand rifle. I have to admit, I am looking at older Marlin rifles instead of new Marlins.
 

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Hello Taylor,

What you need is a used gun. In talking with some of the people that owned guns from the past, (including my father who is close to 80), guns that were made in the 40's and 50's that are so sought after now for their smoothness and and nice bores, had to be broken in as well. I have bought several new guns. Some of them I have smoothed up and some I have just shot a lot and gotten smoothed up. Most people can't believe the difference between my guns and new ones. They all start out rough. I guess this is why they need broken in. Many do not start to function to full perfection until after about 500 rounds. Many of us will never fire the guns that much, and that is too bad. The guns full potential has never been reached. The bores on my guns are as follows. 357 slugs at .3575.
45-70 is .458. (Ruger 45-70 is .4585). Brothers 35 is .358. 375 is .377, 38-55 is .3795. My two 30-30's are both .3085. One is microgroove and one is ballard. Much of the over bored stuff is in referrence to needing to fit cast bullets to the largest groove diameter. Lands are fine. The Marlins I have shot have great accuracy and so they must know a little about what they are doing. My real beef comes with the trigger. I know guys will do trigger jobs on them, but I do replace mine with a Wild West, which slicks them up just great. A couple of mine have great triggers to begin with. On another note, I would have to say that if you want accuracy, I would stick with the rifle calibers. Pistol calibers just don't seem to produce as accurate loads if pushing them up around their potential. I'm not talking about so inaccurate they are not usable, I am talking about getting fine accuracy. I believe the cases with shoulders are superior in accuracy. Also, the tapered ones seem to have an edge as well. Just my opinion. Good luck!
 
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Taylor said:
Do the new 41 Marlin's have oversized bores? On another forum, there has been talk about new Marlin rifles having oversized bores. Apparently someone purchased a new rifle, had accuracy problems, slugged the rifle and the bore was .002 oversized. After the subject was posted, more people checked their rifles and found their bores oversized. Have any of you slugged your rifle (new production) and checked the bore? I would like to know if new 30-30, 35, and 44 Marlins are oversized as well.

I have a problem "wanting" to purchase a new Marlin. You should not have to smooth the action, rework the trigger to reduce the poundage, firelap the barrel to remove the speed bumps (constriction cause by dove tails for the rear sight or where the barrel is screwed in the receiver), and now an oversized barrel. I love Marlin rifles, but what has happened to their quality control?
"
Instead of purchasing a new Marlin rifle and keeping the company in business, more and more people are trying to find older Marlin rifles in good condition or purchasing a different brand rifle. I have to admit, I am looking at older Marlin rifles instead of new Marlins.
" I agree


Yes the new 44 are .432 45/70 Are 459-459.5 35 Rem are .360.do not know about the 30/30. my friends 30 year old 30/30 is fine.
Marlin calls it the new Saami spec.

My 1954 RC 336/35 is perfect.
At least with a used rifle you can pick them over and check them out. You are hardly going to do that with a new gun out of the box.
I sold my 1985 guide that I had bought new because of these issues . Then I just bought a used 94 44 Mag that is eleven years old. It is good.
Now I have two out of four good Marlins
 
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