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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back in January I bought a Remington Hepburn with a heavy full octagon .40-70SS barrel. Only problem was the barrel was cut to 22" from the original 30" barrel. After some searching, I found a fellow up north of me in Washington, who said he could stretch the old barrel back to 30"!
After visiting John Taylor Machine, I saw he really could do the work, and when it was done, make it look exactly like original! I left the gun for John to do, and he finished it in a week!
When John was done he sent the parts to Dale Woody who freshened the rollstamps, and rust blued the barrel again. I got it back today, and it looks like a factory barrel that was never installed on a gun! Perfect in every way, and no sign of the extra length added, and no sign of the liner that John installed after he lengthened the barrel! The workmanship is fantastic, and the cost very reasonable, especially since the gun now has a new bore, and correct length barrel!
I'll reassemble the Hepburn this weekend, and if weather permits take it to the range to test the loads I've worked up while it was away.
This is the first time I've ever heard of this type of work being done, and John Taylor is a real craftsman! Dale's engraving, and rollstamp work is impeccable also! Both great sources if you find yourself with a nice old gun that someone chopped the barrel off!
 

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Sounds interesting, and certainly plausible to me. There was a booming business a few years back, shortening the pre-64 model 70 for the benchrest crowd- often done in 6mm PPC cal. Work involved cutting a section out of the action and bolt and welding it all back together again. After this work, the action and bolt were usually shipped out for strictly controlled re-hardening.

I'd be curious as to the strength of a bbl job like this- of course one deciding factor could be the diameter of the liner...

Keep us posted, and let us know how she shoots!

Regards

Doc Sharptail
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
John said he's done a lot of these, but stays with old calibers that don't develope high pressures. He also says the liners themselves are as strong as the old barrels were, so when the job is completed, the finished barrel is stronger than the original was.
Weather looks good here, so hopefully I'll find out this weekend!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here's before and after pics. Looks a lot better without the stubby barrel!






 

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Val, that is a fantastic pc. Work looks top-notch. Congrats. JAP
 

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I see Hepburnitis is slowly creeping in......pretty soon there will be no more Marlins, no more Ballards, etc. in the safe. It will be filled with Hepburns. Must be those "little levers". :D

max
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, I have a weakness for Hepburns, and could easily own a bunch if only I was rich! :wink: Seems I am relegated to finding these "culls" that need work, and trying to get them back to good shooting condition!
 

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Do you guys remember that 1893 that was floating around recently with the 36" barrel ? There is no doubt in my mind that the barrel was stretched on that rifle in a simular manner, only not nearly as nice of work. I saw up-close pictures of that one and the workmanship was shoddy at best.....

Nice rifle, Val.

WB
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Wisbone!
I suspected it was a barrel stretch job, just because of the length. I was a little disappointed with the bluing on this barrel. Somehow got a miscommunication with the guy who blued it, and he thought I wanted it to look well worn, so he didn't give it much more than passing rust solution. To say the least I was shocked when I opened it! I ended up removing his work, and redoing it myself. Came out much better, so in the end I'm happy. Next time I'll be more specific, and give better instructions, as I think I was a little vague.
 
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