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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a victorinox stainless knife that just dont hold an edge.
One onion and it needs to be sharpened
I try belt sharpening, dialmond stone, touch-ups with a steel.
It gets sharp, but dont stay long at all
do I need a carbon steel blade or will hollow grinding help?
thanks...mike
 

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Take it back, I own several and they do hold and edge. Most often when I want a knife now I look up COLD STEEL their CARBON V and stainless knives hold an edge beyond what most others do. I'll give you a first hand account of what I done, I bought several cold steel knives amongst them was a Red River Knife to compliment my black powder activities. This is a knife similar to a Green River of the fur trade era. Quite a thin blade like a butcher knife, I did not like the original edge which came fairly dull on purpose because this was a kit and had to be put together. After assembling it I put an edge on it, then after skinning and butchering 5 deer, it finally had to be rehoned. I tested this knife after 4 deer it would still dry shave hair off my arm. After the 5th it would not and required moisture to shave hair off my arm. Get on line and look up their product line the have most anything a man could need or want from paring to all out military fighting knives. Fillet knives, hunting, etc.
 

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redshirt said:
I have a victorinox stainless knife that just dont hold an edge.
I have a Victorinox pocket knife I found a number of years ago. Overall it's a good knife but its ability to hold an edge leaves something to be desired. This situation exists because of the amount of chrome in the blade. The high amounts of chrome make it an extremely rust resistant knife but hender it's ability to hold an edge. Another knife I have is a Gerber knife that holds an excellent edge but is very prone to rust. This situation exists because the Gerber has very little chrome.

So, it’s a bit of trade off. If you want a knife that holds a good edge look for one that is lacking in chrome (Gerbers and Benchmades knifes). If you plan to expose it to lots of water and moisture the Victorinox pocket knifes are probably a better choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for all the replies
wood cutting board
the chrome thing makes sense to me
I just bought a farberware that says "high carbon stainless"
they promise this is way good...mike
 

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I have 2 kitchen knives that I treasure and jealously guard. One is a 10" Henckel, bought in Munich 34 years ago when they were still made in Germany and hard to find in the US. To give an idea of how long ago that was, I carried it home in my carryon bag through German, French, and Lichtenstein customs, onto my transAtlantic flight, into JFK in NY, and on to my final flight home, and no one even blinked! The other is a Chicago Cutlery "Professional" chef knife, made in China and purchased recently at the going-out-of-business sale of a local supermarket for $7. High quality steel, believe it or not, in spite of its Chinese origin. Both take and hold an edge almost forever if not abused.
 

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I am not a metallurgist or a knife expert. Over the years I have had similar experiences with knives that would, or would not, hold an edge. Brand and price are no guarantee, either.

I am using a locking folder, brand name G96, that my dad bought for me at K-Mart probably 35 years ago. It was inexpensive and has something of an unusual blade profile but year after year it is my "go-to" knife because it holds an edge. I can field dress an elk without sharpening, touch up the edge overnight and use it for field butchering the next day. It is a jewel.
 

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Being an artist/blacksmith, I often forge blades..even though it is not my main thrust in my smithy.
Take the Victorinox back..the Victorinox/Forschner line is normally a high quality line. Forschners are a popular brand with commercial slaughterhouses..
I have dealt in cutlery for several years. One of the really great American brands I have found is the Dexter/Russell line. This is an old company (1834)...the Russell "Green River" line is the much fabled Green River knives of the mountain men and furnished by this same company.
Historically, the Russell knives were high carbon, but today are high carbon stainless.
I have had glowing reports by folks I have sold such cutlery to. One farmer that does much butchering, told me that the skinner I sold him would skin 5 beeves before needing any serious touch up!
My personal chef knife is a Russell..

For tactical/survival type knives, I heartily recommend the Ontario line.
I live about 4 miles from the Ontario factory and the Vice Pres. is a personal friend.
Ontario makes ALL the blades (bayonets, machetes & fighting knives) used by the USMC and most of the blades used by the other branches.
Ontario recently was given a federal award..scoring 100 out of a possible 100 points for quality supplier...an almost unheard of feat.

A couple links: <www.dexter-russell.com>

<www.ontarioknife.com>



Ontario also owns Queen: <www.queencutlerycollectors.com>


Queen is a great collector's line. They have many hand operations, including hand polishing with emery cloth..

BTW...You will find my friend's name on the 4th ed. President's Choice knife by Queen..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
ironglow...great log -in name
thanks for the input
I have had this knife for 30 years
is there anthing else that would help...tempering maybe?
thanks...mike
 

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Redshirt;
The edge could probably be retempered, if the steel is basically good.
I started out to tell you how to do it, but that would have taken a rather large post.
You should be able to do a google search for "blade tempering" and find a good tutorial.

You can get into the forums on <www.knifeforums.com> or

<www.knifenetwork.com>

You should find some good tutorials there..

If you want to edge temper it, perhaps just a wet rag wrapped around the handle may keep it isolated from the heat.

Complete retempering would of course require removing the handle..

If you need more help..ask and I'll see if I can help..

PS..try the guys aat the forums on

<http://forums.dfoggknives.com/>

They may be able to help you..
 
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