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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The throat on my 336 is tight. If I miss the roll crimp to the tight side just a wee bit the case swells behind the crimp and the round won't chamber. Since I only load three rounds at a time I thought I'd try not using a roll crimp. Have any of you had good or bad luck doing this? I am also switching to IMR3031 in the hopes to more fully fill the case to (hopefully) further reduce the chance of bullet set-back. How much smaller than the bullet do you figure the case neck ought to be to try this, .004" or so?

Thanks,
Scott
 

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Scott,

I think you need to get the Lee's factory crimp die. Not crimping you bullets in place might give you poor performance and also the bullet my shift inwards at any time. The dies are cheap. midwayusa.com has them for under 10 bucks.

Mad
 

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Mad is right they will not bulge the case and you will not have to worry about the bullet moving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is Lee's crimp die a taper like the 45acp uses or still a roll? Guess I don't know what The Factory Crimp is, I've never seen a factory loaded round for 35 Remmy. I'm using Redding (might be RCBS though, I'd have to go look) that combines bullet seating with crimping. I usually back out the die to seat and then adjust it to crimp in a seperate operation. I went ahead and loaded several rounds today sans crimp using .003" interferance fit. I may load my normal three, shoot two and then check what's in the magazine to see if OAL has changed. If I suffer bullet set-back I will check into the Lee die. FWIW the throat is quite short in this gun, the seated bullet is all but touching the lands so I would be inclined to think the way it's crimped shouldn't affect accuracy. Thanks for the responces!

Scott
 

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It also sounds like you need to very consistent about the trim length of your brass. If the cases are all the same length then the roll crimp will be easier to manage. One source of the bulging is when a case is just a little longer than the other cases, it gets rolled more drastically than the others.

The Lee FCD is neither a roll or taper crimp. It literally squeezes the case mouth from all sides at ones. When properly applied is simply settles the mouth of the case into the cannelure without any distortion. They only run about $8, well worth the investment.
 

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scottnc said:
Is Lee's crimp die
Scott
Hey Scott,

It is a crimp die. Has four parts of a circle that squeez together as u press down. It does an awesome job on all of my calibres, 30-30, 45-70 and 7.62.54r. U will love it.

Mad
 

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Reading your post two things come to mind. First are you trimming your brass? Necked rifle brass stretches a lot. I always trim my 30-30 brass before reloading it. Lee sells a really easy to use case trimmer. Its item number on midwayusa.com is 427293.

Another suggestion is to use the Lee factory crimp die. I use these on both the 45-70gov (when being used in the 1895) and the 30-30. It works great. Its item number on midwayusa.com is 599720.

I hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yep, I trim. 2.905 inches. A little short but when I bought brass I bought 200pc's (Remmington) and some are shorter than others or have a lopsided neck that using 2.905 seems to take care of.

Scott
 

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Scott, I think you mean 1.905" for .35 Remington case length. Normal range is 1.910" (minimum) and 1.920" (maximum).

A proper roll crimp should be fine despite your short throat. Actually, most Marlins in .35 have a slightly long chamber neck and NO throat. The throats are not tight in these rifles, just nonexistent. The distance to the rifling origin is short.

I would also recommend the Lee FCD if your current dies are giving you trouble. Don't trim too short or the Lee die will have nothing to crimp with. Stay with the standard minimum case OAL when using it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You are right 35remmy, 1.905" is correct. Sorry. A large portion of my brass is that once fired, 1.910-.15" is the longest any of it is. I bought 200 pc's so I figgured I'd live with it. Also, I meant that the throat was short. Further, I mis-wrote in an earlier post about never having access to factory ammo as I did find one box of PMC. First stuff ever fired out of this rifle. The bullet jambed into the rifling to the point that the bolt wouldn't close and upon opening, the bullet stayed in the barrel and the powder went down into the reciever. I bought a throating reamer and lengthened it just enough to allow the lever to close without force.

I fire-form the brass, neck size only, leaving a little "bump" ahead of the case shoulder, trim to the length given earlier and seat to an O-give dimension rather than OAL. When roll-crimping I had detected a tendancy for the case, right behind the crimp to swell an barely noticable amount if the crimp was too agressive. You can't see it or feel it but a mic will measure it. I got in the habit of chambering all loaded rounds for hunting but unless you really watch, it's easy to miss how little the lever lacks of fulling coming up when the crimp is over done. I have been in the tree stand in the dark, loaded the rifle only to find that the hammer won't set to half-cock because the bolt won't close!

Don't know if my idea to seat the bullet like the round was going into a bolt action will work or not but as long as I pay attention there shouldn't be any safety issues. The Lee Factory Crimp die sounds like a good deal, I will look for one. No more than it costs it's a no-brainer not to go ahead and get one.

Scott
 

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What bullet are you using scottnc? I found it impossible to put a roll crimp on a Remington 200 grain Cor-Lokt. The ring of hash marks around the bullet doesn't really have a groove the mouth can be rolled into. All my attempts to put on a roll crimp with this bullet resulted in no crimp at all or no crimp and a buldged neck. The Factor Crimp Die solved this problem for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
200gr round nose Sierra's. They have the same problem with the cannalure (sp?) as you're describing Kart29. A "roll crimp" is what the die function is called but in practice the result does not resemble what I see on my various handgun lead bullet rounds using a roll crimp.

Scott
 
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