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Bettcha caint tell I are a bottle neck cartridge reloader. I am getting ready to start reloading for my Marlin 1895 Classic. Got my brass cleaned and ready. Got my RCBS 3 die set.

First Question: When do I trim? With my bottle necks it is, of course, after the sizing. Is that now after the size and expand?

Second Question: Which crimp do I want to use?

Anyother tips or tricks ya wanna throw in would be GREAT!
 

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MarkA,
I loaded 45-70s for 5 differrent rifles. I always did my trimming after resizing, BUT before expanding. I would think that flaring the case mouth prior to trimming would cause the mouth to be trimmed uneven. As for the crimp, I never crimped for my single shot rifles, and I utilized the crimping feature in my RCBS seating die for my 1895. Good luck!
 

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Mark,

Most of us use the Lee Factory Crimp die. No collapsed cases, and it evens the pressure out so the load is more repeatable/predictable.
 

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Crimping is easily done with the third die. Frustration comes if the cases are uneven legnths. I also like to trim after sizing and before flairing the necks.

Crimping is done for a number of reasons. The obvious for a cartridge like the 45-70 is to hold the bullets in place in a tubular mag. But it is also done to help bullet retension. Espically with the faster burning powders. (Hot loaded 45-70s benifit here) Many times, when using a crimp, your velocitys average closer together, resulting in a lower extream spread and better acuracy. As a rule I crimp all 45-70 loads I use.

I know of many people using the factory crimp die....I am not one of them. I do not see a need for it. I am just not that fond of a factory crimp. I'll take my roll or taper crimp anyday.

CW
 

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Dr. A said:
Mark,

Most of us use the Lee Factory Crimp die. No collapsed cases, and it evens the pressure out so the load is more repeatable/predictable.

I've had reloads with a RCBS type roll crimp (did I get that right) and found some had shortened enough in the tube....not the fault of the crimp, just the guy reloading. The loads were a bit on the stout side.

Anyway, that's why I use the Lee die sets including the FCD. I was getting a third shot flyer every time from those reloads until I started doing my own loads with the Lee stuff. End of flyer. End of story :lol:

Do what works for ya.




Perferator
 

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I use the Lee factory crimp die.And wouldn't reload a lever action with out the lee factory crimp.But thats just my opinion..

dd444
 

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For my lead bullets I'm using the RCBS crimp that comes with the 3-die set. For jacketed bullets, the Lee crimp is much easier and you will not risk denting your cartridges.

Tom
 

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Somebody suggested a Redding Profile Crimp die to me when I got into reloading for the 45-70,he also suggested the Lee factory crimp die.I have been useing both.I found that with the Lee crimp die,that I was really crushing the case mouth and I began to worry if I was weakening the case mouth and creating a possible splitting problem.It might be that I just didn't have the Lee die adjusted correctly.I am finding out that the Redding Profile Crimp die is really making a very nice uniform crimp,without crushing the case mouth.After reserching,I found that the Redding Profile Crimp is also recommended for cast bullets since it bites into the bullet.Maybe somebody else can give you more info on the Redding die but as far as I know,most everybody uses the Lee Factory crimp die here and they have no complaints about it.
 

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another noob question

I have to buy a few more items for my RCBS single stage anyway, so I am interested in the Lee Factory Crimp Die too. Will that work in my RCBS?
 

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ajwharton, yes the Lee FCD will work in your RCBS press - they are a
standardized thread & diameter, and I use the Lee FCD in my
RCBS single stage press (the press that comes with the Rockchucker Supreme reloading package).

Once you get it adjusted properly, it works very well and is very
consistent.
 

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MarkA –

Here’s a few suggestions based on how I do it.

1. I trim often and to 2.095”. After flaring the cases. (Its pretty rare that I let cases get over 0.004” over trim length.) With straight or relatively straight-wall cases the pilot often won’t fit inside the case moth easily without flaring. This is a personal preference based on the fact that I like to prepare the brass ahead of time and so never know what I will be reloading when the time comes. I use a roll crimp on one of my loads and uniform length makes for more uniform results.

2. Let me comment that my older RCBS trimmer has been converted to run off an electric drill which I hold in my right hand while my left hand works the “T” handle while inserting and removing cases. The conversion cost me a trip to a hardware store where I purchased a properly threaded stainless bolt (for strength), a regular nut and a cap nut. I removed the screw that held the crank handle in place, cut the head of the stainless bolt off and threaded it into the screw hole. Then I replaced the crank and threaded the nut over it. Finally I ran the cap nut down on the threads and tightened it up against the other nut, making sure the flats were aligned. I use a nut driver in the drill. The rounded top of the cap nut makes it easy to get the nut driver on the nut and I find that as long as the drill is spinning it will “hold” onto the nut, making it easy to run the cutter shaft in and out. The conversion cost about $10 including the nut driver and allows me to trim over 400 cases an hour. Something to consider. Sure beats He!! Out of hand cranking…

3. I use the RCBS dies and run the expander well down into the case. For most bullets I run it down about as far as the bullet base will be, or about 1/2”. This may not work with older RCBS dies as I think they changed the shape of the expander.

4. A Lee crimp tool is essential if you are loading Remington 405’s and is very handy with some other bullets. I use a roll crimp with the North Fork bullets and a Lee crimp with everything else.

5. Obviously I crimp as a separate process with the Lee, but I do it separately with the roll crimp, too.

Good luck with your relaods!
 
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