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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello knowledgeable people.

New 30-30 reloader from Norway, having some issues with reloading. I got my hands on two different bullets from Sierra after reading that one can use 'all'. 308 bullets as long as they are round or flat nosed, and has a crimping groove.

I bought two different bullets from Sierra, as stated. 170 gr FN #2010 specifically labeled as a 30-30 bullet, and 150 gr RN #2135 NOT specifically labeled for 30-30 - but to my limited knowledge should be usable. Right...?

But I must have misunderstood something. Reloading the latter, crimping at the groove, there was no way it would chamber in my 336. The lever would not close, and looking at the bullet after it failed to chamber it clearly had a circle on it indicating it made contact inside the gun barrel. The OAL of the bullet was more than below max.

Looking at the two bullets side by side I can clearly see they have a different taper on them, indicating that they are indeed of a different design.

So, after a long post (sorry) my question is: aren't 'all'. 308 bullets usable after all? Must they be 30-30 specifically? Looked at several reloading videos using i.e Hornady. 308 150 gr RN for 30-30 indicating that at least they work. Is this Sierra specific? I'm confused :)

Thanks!

Tommy
 

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I know that in the case of Sierra, they make 30 caliber round nose bullets that are designed for cartridges such as the 30-06, .308, etc, which evidently are the ones you have. They are going to have heavier jackets than 30-30 bullets and likely won't perform too well in a hunting situation because they are designed for higher speeds.

You could use them for target shooting in your 30-30 once you seat them deep enough to chamber. Obviously, you won't be wanting to max out your powder charge because seating a bullet deeper raises pressures and you won't be able to utilize the crimp groove.

If it were me, I would try and sell or trade them for 30-30 bullets.
 

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I doubt the bullets are longer. They probably just have the crimp groove in the wrong place. I would load them to the correct OAL and shoot them single shot. I would not hunt larger game with them either but I would plink with them. Plinking is the most fun but they could be used on the occasional varmit if you live out in the country.
 

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Bullet 2135 does have a different profile from the the dedicated Sierra 150gr, 30-30 bullet (#2000). Also failed to find any reference to the correct seating depth for this bullet in a 30-30. Just keep seating the bullet deeper and deeper until it just chambers without resistance, and at that point seat a few hundreds deeper still. Start the load with on the mild side, and build up. A primary concern is that if the bullet will be loaded beyond the point were the cannelure can be used, an effect crimp maybe difficult or impossible to acheive, which if this is the case, would argue against loading more than one into the magazine. RJY66 already offered wisdom on possible game performance concerns.

Depending on easy/difficult it is to buy, sell, trade bullets....you can certainly burn them up shooting groups or doing speed drills etc. If you shoot a Moose with this rifle, would really appreciate pics.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the informative answers. I think I will do as suggested, and just seat the bullet as deep as it needs to be and crimp with my Lee FCD. Will only use them for target practice.

But I'm still correct regarding the use of. 308 bullets - just not Sierra. Or have you encountered this problem using any other brand, similarly not labeled specifically for 30-30? Like the above mentioned Hornady?
 

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Just seat them deep enough until they chamber and cycle. Bullets designed for 30-06's, and 308's etc... have an ogive that starts much earlier than a 30-30 bullet.

As advised, do not use them for hunting. You won't be able to push them fast enough to allow the bullet to mushroom properly.
 

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As a rule yes, 30-30 specific is what you want for trouble free loading and game performance. Some non 30-30 bullets will have such extreme taper you may not be able to crimp at all.
 

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Well it is confusing, especially for new people. As I understand it, the Hornady 150 grain RN is for 30-30 but it is not specified. Looking at my old Speer manual, they make both a 150 grain round nose AND flat point. The flat point shows up in the 30-30 section and has a crimp groove. The RN does not have a crimp groove and shows up in the sections for the faster 30 caliber cartridges.

So anyway, if the bullets you are buying are not advertised as being for the 30-30, it is best to ask questions before buying or consult a manual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A quick update.

At about OAL 2.4680 the cartridge chambered fine. And thanks to my Lee FCD I could crimp even if the crimp groove was under the rim.

Will be making a range test shortly. Thanks for the help!
 

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Well it is confusing, especially for new people. As I understand it, the Hornady 150 grain RN is for 30-30 but it is not specified. Looking at my old Speer manual, they make both a 150 grain round nose AND flat point. The flat point shows up in the 30-30 section and has a crimp groove. The RN does not have a crimp groove and shows up in the sections for the faster 30 caliber cartridges.

So anyway, if the bullets you are buying are not advertised as being for the 30-30, it is best to ask questions before buying or consult a manual.
If a bullet doesn't have a cannelure (crimp groove), then it wasn't designed for 30-30. They used to sell cannelure tools that could be used to roll a cannelure in a bullet, but if a bullet doesn't have the cannelure, then most probably it was designed for higher velocities of bolt action rifles and their cartridges, i.e.: 30-40, 300 Savage, 308 Win, 30-06, and so on. Hence, because it was designed for higher velocities of the bolt rifle cartridges, the jacket may be a little heavier than a 30-30 designed bullet. The heavier jacketed bullet may work in the 30-30, but not at the extreme edge of the 30-30s range due to too much loss of velocity. It will work at close range, but not further out. Unfortunately, the manufacturers only make two types of 30 caliber bullets. Those for 30-30, and those for everything else.
 
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