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Is that schematic (75) the same as the 75C (ours is the 75C)... I was under the impression they were different?
Hole in the hammer strut, (and pretty much everything else) is consistent in the model 75, 75C, 60, 99, 99m1, and a number of other model 60 variations. There have been very few changes in the action overall, since it's inception 60+ years ago. Biggest difference in the 75 and 75C is length of the magazine tube. The 75 has a 9 round tube, the 75C has a 14 round tube.

75C Schematic:
 

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This is a long, potentially boring post, but it highlights a risk that almost everyone who shoots tube magazine rimfires knows. A handful never know, and some of the rest of us forget, though.

Ensure that he knows how to unload the 60 - As Rocky pointed out, his 75C is very similar to the 60 - and can confirm it's empty. If he already knows, he's way ahead of the pack! If he shoots 'til it's empty, it's pretty simple. That's the most enjoyable way to make sure it's empty. Check the chamber, cycle the action and check the chamber again. Empty... right?

I really don't want to sound like an old nanny, but... this is important. There are a couple of ways that it's possible to think a tubular magazine is empty, yet there WILL be a round still in the rifle!

Here are a couple of links to Model 60 (75C) manuals. This first one is more "vintage", and it includes the Model 75 like your sons.

http://www.louiscandell.com/pdf/firearms/marlin_60.pdf

Then, here's the current (lawyer approved) version from the present Marlin website, and it's for self-loading rimfires with tubular magazines.

https://www.marlinfirearms.com/assets/pdfs/manual_22tube_20201222.pdf

Notice that the instructions about how to unload the magazine have changed slightly, and the lawyers no longer permit dumping unfired rounds out of the tube!

Here's why - What if there were live rounds put into the magazine but not fired? There are the "couple of ways": First, if one stops shooting with known live rounds in the magazine or, second, say it was loaded with no intention of firing? (Yeah, we're not supposed to do that but ... it's a function check, and I'll be careful - most of us have been there... I'll confess first)

Unlock the inner magazine tube and dump out the unfired rounds are (by tipping the muzzle down), just as the old manual says. Both manuals say to cycle the action "repeatedly" until ejection of cartridges ceases. In the first case, where we stopped shooting with know live rounds, we know the first cycle of the action is going to eject a round because we were shooting and it's an auto-loader. Then, when we cycle it the second time, another round is ejected!? That's because when the tube mag was loaded, the loading mechanism caught a round and held it, by design.

Then, what about the second case where I had no intention of shooting and didn't chamber a round? (Yeah, I wanted to see whether it holds 14 or 15 rounds) Dump them out and count 'em? okay... but first, cycle the action: No round ejected, and that makes sense I didn't expect one 'cuz I never "loaded" it, right? Right! Here's the kicker: There's a round in the chamber now!! So, cycle it again: A live round ejected! Yep! Same loading mechanism captured the first round and held it... it won't dump out with the rest.

Shooting forums, YouTube, and range rooms are full of stories about inadvertent discharges of tubular magazine rimfires that were "empty". Some folks say it's a design flaw, but it's not (Manufacturers would have fixed it decades ago in that case).

Both the "vintage" and "current" manuals say to cycle the action 'til it stops ejecting cartridges, because that's the only way to know it's truly empty, and it's been kinda dumbed down for those of us that read the manuals.

I try to gather knowledge, learn from other's experiences (especially mistakes) and use good judgement, so no, I haven't had an inadvertent discharge... yet...

Your son will love his 75, and it'll give him great memories!

v/r,
'tool
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
This is a long, potentially boring post, but it highlights a risk that almost everyone who shoots tube magazine rimfires knows. A handful never know, and some of the rest of us forget, though.

Ensure that he knows how to unload the 60 - As Rocky pointed out, his 75C is very similar to the 60 - and can confirm it's empty. If he already knows, he's way ahead of the pack! If he shoots 'til it's empty, it's pretty simple. That's the most enjoyable way to make sure it's empty. Check the chamber, cycle the action and check the chamber again. Empty... right?

I really don't want to sound like an old nanny, but... this is important. There are a couple of ways that it's possible to think a tubular magazine is empty, yet there WILL be a round still in the rifle!

Here are a couple of links to Model 60 (75C) manuals. This first one is more "vintage", and it includes the Model 75 like your sons.

http://www.louiscandell.com/pdf/firearms/marlin_60.pdf

Then, here's the current (lawyer approved) version from the present Marlin website, and it's for self-loading rimfires with tubular magazines.

https://www.marlinfirearms.com/assets/pdfs/manual_22tube_20201222.pdf

Notice that the instructions about how to unload the magazine have changed slightly, and the lawyers no longer permit dumping unfired rounds out of the tube!

Here's why - What if there were live rounds put into the magazine but not fired? There are the "couple of ways": First, if one stops shooting with known live rounds in the magazine or, second, say it was loaded with no intention of firing? (Yeah, we're not supposed to do that but ... it's a function check, and I'll be careful - most of us have been there... I'll confess first)

Unlock the inner magazine tube and dump out the unfired rounds are (by tipping the muzzle down), just as the old manual says. Both manuals say to cycle the action "repeatedly" until ejection of cartridges ceases. In the first case, where we stopped shooting with know live rounds, we know the first cycle of the action is going to eject a round because we were shooting and it's an auto-loader. Then, when we cycle it the second time, another round is ejected!? That's because when the tube mag was loaded, the loading mechanism caught a round and held it, by design.

Then, what about the second case where I had no intention of shooting and didn't chamber a round? (Yeah, I wanted to see whether it holds 14 or 15 rounds) Dump them out and count 'em? okay... but first, cycle the action: No round ejected, and that makes sense I didn't expect one 'cuz I never "loaded" it, right? Right! Here's the kicker: There's a round in the chamber now!! So, cycle it again: A live round ejected! Yep! Same loading mechanism captured the first round and held it... it won't dump out with the rest.

Shooting forums, YouTube, and range rooms are full of stories about inadvertent discharges of tubular magazine rimfires that were "empty". Some folks say it's a design flaw, but it's not (Manufacturers would have fixed it decades ago in that case).

Both the "vintage" and "current" manuals say to cycle the action 'til it stops ejecting cartridges, because that's the only way to know it's truly empty, and it's been kinda dumbed down for those of us that read the manuals.

I try to gather knowledge, learn from other's experiences (especially mistakes) and use good judgement, so no, I haven't had an inadvertent discharge... yet...

Your son will love his 75, and it'll give him great memories!

v/r,
'tool
He'll be reading this multiple times! Out loud. I don't mess around!
 

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Hey Pete - thanks for the follow-up post with pic. I think you "dun good" and your son will enjoy that Marlin!
 
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