Marlin Firearms Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picked up a Glenfield 30 (SN has AB- prefix '67?) with a short mag tube and plain birch stocks recently. Placed an old Weaver K-2.5 on it and stopped by an indoor range today. Was very impressed with how it shoots. I've never really shot much lever action, much less 30-30 (although I'm now a Team 30-30 and 35 Rem member) I was shocked at its accuracy. Pretty much one-hole, 3-shot groups at 25 yards. I suspect that is less than 2" at 100 yards.

Recoil was mild, and it has a very smooth action. It looks like it's been around the block a few times - it came from "smallville" West Virginia. The metal had surface rust and the stock has a bowling pin finish. That finish will be coming off when the weather warms a little and I can get the strippers out.

A couple questions from a newbie on levers and 30-30

1. I have a '57 336RC in 35 Rem that I've yet to shoot and it has a much stiffer trigger - Is that typical of older Marlins the Glenfields or does my 35 Rem have issues?
2. When I reload 30-30 can I just neck-size and crimp if sending it through the same action and same chamber?
3. I really like the thicker forearm of the earlier SC's - are those forearms and buttstocks interchangeable?


Now I have my eye on a '49 SC in 30-30. But it needs some cleaning up - lots of potential and fun. Would love to find a vintage receiver sight for that one since no d/t.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,197 Posts
You can reload for .30-30 by neck sizing only if you are going to be using the cartridges in only one rifle. However, after about 3-5 reloadings, it may get difficult to chamber or extract the cases because of progressive stretching, and you will then have to full-length resize them.

Lever guns do not have the camming action of bolt rifles, so it can be difficult to remove a stuck case. To avoid this risk, I routinely FLR for my 336s, but I have used a Lee Loader (which neck sizes only) in years past, and it worked OK for awhile.

I wouldn't give up on your existing birch stocks just yet. Your non-checkered version is less common than later stocks with pressed-in "checkering" consisting of an oak leaf and deer head pattern, and in my opinion, look much nicer. I'll bet if you refinished them, they would look fine. If you prefer the perch belly forearm, the fat birch forarm from the 336A (the newer budget Walmart version sold between 2-5 years ago or so, not the walnut 1950s 336A) will screw right onto your Model 30. I have a set on mine. You probably already know this, but the forend designed for a barrel band will not fit the Model 30, which uses an endcap.

My Model 30 shoots into a 1.25" group at 100 yards with a load tuned for another rifle, using a cheap 4x scope. I haven't bothered to tailor a load for it because this is good enough for just about any use I can envision needing it for. It will also shoot Hornady LE into a 1" group, and if I needed a longer range rifle, I'd rescope it with 2-7 or 3-9x glass.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,566 Posts
Here's my suggestion. Refinish the birch stocks with bedliner spray. It gives them a nice textured finish and really looks good on the Glenfield 30. This one is a 1967 model, too. Unfortunately I sold it, but it was a fun little gun.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
There's another Glenfield 30A at Beltway Gun and Pawn but price seemed a little high for the condition. I'm about to refinish the Glenfield 30 GT I picked up from there Monday. Glad you are a 30-30,35 shooter now. My 1951 336 SC 35 shoots great with the Hornady ammo. I'm sure it'll be 2" at 100. Good luck!

Jim in Monroe
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top