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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings!

I've just acquired a Marlin 336RC in 30-30, and I need to give it a thorough cleaning. I've found instructions on how to "field strip" it for cleaning -- but it has mild rust spotting all over, and I am wanting to address that, and re-blue.

I found the user manual on the Marlin website, and that has been helpful, but I really need to get the wood furniture off, and separate the barrel, magazine and receiver. I didn't see anything on Marlin's site to give me any instructions on that.

It looks like most disassembly is accomplished using a flat-tip screwdriver, but rather than go off half-cocked, I am hoping that someone here can give me advice that might not be self-evident looking at the rifle. Any pitfalls, cautions, or horrified outcries? :)

Thanks!

Mike
 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms!
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First off, WELCOME to MarlinOwners. Great folks here! Watch some UTube videos, a common denominator is to buy a set of GUN screwdrivers at the least. Brownell's would be a great place to start. Gun screws generally, for aesthetic reasons, have smaller slots than SAE screws and get buggerd up with even Snap-On tools. Go slow, and you will master the little nuances. As far as the rust goes, try #000 or #0000 steel wool and some oil, tread lightly there and take your time, or even Kroil penetrating oil. Unless your gun is a rusted disaster a reblue will cost you and likely lower the value an equal amount to boot. Keep us posted - AC
 

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Ditto the last post. I think there are some links on the forum to several good you tube videos to help you with the disassembly. Depending on the condition, you may want to consider kg gunkote or cerakote as an alternative to rebluing.
 

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As others have said.....the key to disassembling any firearm is to start with a great GUN screw driver set.
 
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deal with the rust spots as described then if you need to re-blue - clean all the oil off with alcohol then try tetra gun blue - its a cold blue but it works well and is easy to use...after bluing rub it out with oil....welcome aboard....
 
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Discussion Starter #10
deal with the rust spots as described then if you need to re-blue - clean all the oil off with alcohol then try tetra gun blue - its a cold blue but it works well and is easy to use...after bluing rub it out with oil....welcome aboard....
What I have already if Birchwood/Casey Perma Blue paste gun blue kit. This one:

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Is the Tetra better, or just as good? And by Tetra do you mean this product?

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Have you blued a gun before ? If not then it's a learning process, I like the permablue better for rebluing, the paste types work well for touch up... for me

The key to blue is preparing the metal for finish, clean/remove oils, and heat. The blue will do a much better job if the metal is heated to the point where you can't hold your hand on it... I have used hot water for this, let the hot water heat the metal good, and keep changing it out to keep the heat going into the metal, you will see the water evaporate and dry metal when you remove the part from the hot water, at this point it will take the cold blue much better. You will want to apply several coats doing this, follow the instructions between each coat.

I'm not being a nay sayer, or a party pooper, but cold blue has never held up well for me. It does ok for touch up, and small parts... If I were investing in a marlin I planned on keeping, I would look at sending it to a known gunsmith to have it reblued. Just something to think about. If after you remove the rust spots it's possible you can touch up with the cold blue, and that's all that will be needed.

Good luck, and keep us posted on the outcome
 

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I have never used copper wool, in fact have never seen it except for the coarse stuff in the grocery store, but I get bronze wool from Amazon and use it with oil to remove light rust. The stuff is brittle, so you get little bits everywhere, but it cleans up easily.
 

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YouTube has a audio/visual on the subject................
 

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When you pull the stock off check for any cracks. I have had this happen. I used Crazy Glue since the crack is so thin. If the glue hits the finish you will need to strip and refinish. Not a bad thing. I like to strip off ugly finishes and go after walnut with Lin-Speed oil.
 
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