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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Finally got my hands on it today. Looks to never have been shot or very little.

Question, does the trigger normally have a lot of forward movement on these guns?

My only comparison is a 9422M I have in a lever gun. The trigger feels a lot different.

It breaks clean and crisp after you take up the movement. Maybe that is just how Marlin 1894 triggers work?

Pictures as promised.

Wood Tableware Fruit Tool Citrus

Office supplies Writing implement Pen Writing instrument accessory Wood

Air gun Plant Wood Trigger Shotgun

Air gun Musical instrument Wood Natural material Gun barrel

Air gun Trigger Wood Gun barrel Shotgun
 

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Finally got my hands on it today. Looks to never have been shot or very little.

Question, does the trigger normally have a lot of forward movement on these guns?

My only comparison is a 9422M I have in a lever gun. The trigger feels a lot different.

It breaks clean and crisp after you take up the movement. Maybe that is just how Marlin 1894 triggers work?

Pictures as promised.

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Gorgeous rifle, welcome to the lever addiction ! The forward movement you’re referring to is just good ol’ Marlin Trigger Flop, It’s a thing, just go with it. It doesn’t affect function or accuracy, if you reeeaaaallly can’t stand it, RPP has a trigger kit that will eliminate it. If it was mine, I’d pull that safety, put a saddle ring delete on it yesterday. Enjoy your new toy !
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Gorgeous rifle, welcome to the lever addiction ! The forward movement you’re referring to is just good ol’ Marlin Trigger Flop, It’s a thing, just go with it. It doesn’t affect function or accuracy, if you reeeaaaallly can’t stand it, RPP has a trigger kit that will eliminate it. If it was mine, I’d pull that safety, put a saddle ring delete on it yesterday. Enjoy your new toy !
Yeah I did some reading on the flop.

Not my favorite, but I believe I can live with it.

I just need to shoot the thing!
 

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Welcome and congratulations on your lovely lever gun!

If I may suggest, you will find that shooting factory ammunition becomes quite limiting. As others have mentioned, or at least alluded to, reloading for the .38SPL is dead easy and very satisfying. Because it's a straight-wall case it's really one of the easiest cartridges to reload. Plus you can load it up for "big bang" fun, or load it down for pussycat shooting characteristics.

I personally don't own or shoot a .38SPL rifle but you can bet your bottom dollar I'm trying to find one! I shoot a lot of .38SPL in pistols, mostly revolvers but have had S&W Model 52 autoloaders, too. The .38 is a truly versatile cartridge. And it's very inexpensive to reload.

I find that 158grain bullets work well in "target" loads, around 2.8-3.0 grains of W231 powder. One can shoot these all day and not tire of the recoil or muzzle blast.

Getting started in reloading doesn't have to cost a fortune. Lee dies work just fine, and get their factory crimp die as it will help smooth out any bulges in the case at the base of the bullet. It doesn't matter what press you use, .38 just doesn't stress the press at all. Look for good used loading equipment and you'll get started for little cash. The advantages in reloading for the .38 are many, the disadvantages too few to note.

Have a hoot with that new rifle. We want to read a range report!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Welcome and congratulations on your lovely lever gun!

If I may suggest, you will find that shooting factory ammunition becomes quite limiting. As others have mentioned, or at least alluded to, reloading for the .38SPL is dead easy and very satisfying. Because it's a straight-wall case it's really one of the easiest cartridges to reload. Plus you can load it up for "big bang" fun, or load it down for pussycat shooting characteristics.

I personally don't own or shoot a .38SPL rifle but you can bet your bottom dollar I'm trying to find one! I shoot a lot of .38SPL in pistols, mostly revolvers but have had S&W Model 52 autoloaders, too. The .38 is a truly versatile cartridge. And it's very inexpensive to reload.

I find that 158grain bullets work well in "target" loads, around 2.8-3.0 grains of W231 powder. One can shoot these all day and not tire of the recoil or muzzle blast.

Getting started in reloading doesn't have to cost a fortune. Lee dies work just fine, and get their factory crimp die as it will help smooth out any bulges in the case at the base of the bullet. It doesn't matter what press you use, .38 just doesn't stress the press at all. Look for good used loading equipment and you'll get started for little cash. The advantages in reloading for the .38 are many, the disadvantages too few to note.

Have a hoot with that new rifle. We want to read a range report!!!!
Thanks for the info.

I do believe that reloading is something I will get into.

I know you can spend as much or as little as you want.

Where do most get there load info from?

Any publications better than others?
 

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Thanks for the info.

I do believe that reloading is something I will get into.

I know you can spend as much or as little as you want.

Where do most get there load info from?

Any publications better than others?
There is a LOT of load information available for the .38SPL. Bullseye shooting forums are usually pretty good for low energy accuracy loads. These would likely be the best place to start.
I've found Hogdon's manual to be pretty good - their HP38 powder is essentially a direct replacement for W-231 with the same load data used for both. Of course the Winchester reloading manual will give you good info for W231 as well.

Just as an example, with 148gr lead wadcutters, my standard load is 2.8gr W231 (or HP38) over a small pistol primer. I use minimal case crimp in order to get "nearly forever" case life.
As another example, I bump up to 3.1gr W231 using a 158gr lead RNFP. These loads will put you in the 850-900FPS velocity range - nice and tame, very enjoyable loads and usually quite accurate as well.
 
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